This image shows the progression of lesions and tissue resorption in planarians when exposed to pathogenic bacteria. The normal animal is to the left, while the middle animal displays a characteristic head lesion, and the animal on the right has already lost its head to bacterial infection.

The sound of a healthy reef

A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) will help researchers understand the ways that marine animal larvae use sound as a cue to settle on coral reefs....

Blending wastewater may help California cope with drought

Recycled wastewater is increasingly touted as part of the solution to California's water woes, particularly for agricultural use, as the state's historic drought continues. The cost of treating wastewater to...

Researchers find vulnerabilities in iPhone, iPad operating system

An international team of computer science researchers has identified serious security vulnerabilities in the iOS - the operating system used in Apple's iPhone and iPad devices. The vulnerabilities make a...

Structural, regulatory and human error were factors in Washington highway bridge collapse

A key factor in the crash was the curved opening of the bridge. The posted height was the maximum in the center, not the lower curved section above the outer lanes, which the truck hit.When an important bridge collapsed on Interstate 5 near Mount Vernon, Washington, in 2013, questions were raised about how such a catastrophic failure could occur. A new analysis by a...

Spherical tokamaks could provide path to limitless fusion energy

This image shows a test cell for National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade with tokamak in the center.Creating "a star in a jar" - replicating on Earth the way the sun and stars create energy through fusion - requires a "jar" that can contain superhot plasma and...

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Scripps Florida scientists shed new light on the role of calcium in learning and memory

Ron Davis is chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Scripps Florida.While calcium's importance for our bones and teeth is well known, its role in neurons--in particular, its effects on processes such as learning and memory--has been less well defined.

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The first autonomous, entirely soft robot

The octobot is powered by a chemical reaction and controlled with a soft logic board. A reaction inside the bot transforms a small amount of liquid fuel (hydrogen peroxide) into a large amount of gas, which flows into the octobot's arms and inflates them like a balloon. A microfluidic logic circuit, a soft analog of a simple electronic oscillator, controls when hydrogen peroxide decomposes to gas in the octobot.A team of Harvard University researchers with expertise in 3D printing, mechanical engineering, and microfluidics has demonstrated the first autonomous, untethered, entirely soft robot. This small, 3D-printed robot -- nicknamed...

ALMA finds unexpected trove of gas around larger stars

Artist impression of a debris disk surrounding a star in the Scorpius-Centaurus Association. ALMA discovered that -- contrary to expectations -- the more massive stars in this region retain considerable stores of carbon monoxide gas. This finding could offer new insights into the timeline for giant planet formation around young stars.Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) surveyed dozens of young stars -- some Sun-like and others approximately double that size -- and discovered that the larger variety have...

Symmetry crucial for building key biomaterial collagen in the lab

Simple shapes, such as these fish, can tile large surfaces if their geometry allows for symmetry. The edges each tessellating fish share with their surroundings are identical from fish to fish. Similarly, assemblies of collagen protein "tiles" can be achieved when the chemical and physical environments of every tile are designed to be identical, allowing scientists to produce synthetic collagen nanofibers.Collagen makes up the cartilage in our knee joints, the vessels that transport our blood, and is a crucial component in our bones. It is the most abundant protein found...

Well-wrapped feces allow lobsters to eat jellyfish stingers without injury

Empty circles are the nematocysts, or stinging cells, of jellyfish that have been packed together and wrapped tightly into packages of feces in the beginning of the lobster's digestive tract.  The membrane, which can be seen extending off to the right side of the image, is a mechanical adaptation to prevent lobsters from being killed by their venomous food.Lobsters eat jellyfish without harm from the venomous stingers due to a series of physical adaptations. Researchers from Hiroshima University examined lobster feces to discover that lobsters surround their...

Crystal unclear: Why might this uncanny crystal change laser design?

These potassium diphosphate (KDP) crystals, which self-assemble in solution as hollow hexagonal rods, could find use in laser technology, particularly for fiber-optic communications. The scanning-electron image at right shows a crystal at higher resolution with scale added.Laser applications may benefit from crystal research by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and China's Shandong University. They have discovered a potential way to sidestep...

3-D-printed structures 'remember' their shapes

In this series, a 3-D printed multimaterial shape-memory minigripper, consisting of shape-memory hinges and adaptive touching tips, grasps a cap screw.Engineers from MIT and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) are using light to print three-dimensional structures that "remember" their original shapes. Even after being stretched, twisted, and bent...

Electrons at the speed limit

A short laser pulse travels through a diamond (black spheres) and excites electrons inside it. The strength of the excitation is measured using an attosecond ultraviolet pulse (violet).Speed may not be witchcraft, but it is the basis for technologies that often seem like magic. Modern computers, for instance, are as powerful as they are because tiny switches...

Planet found in habitable zone around nearest star

This artist's impression shows a view of the surface of the planet Proxima b orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Solar System. The double star Alpha Centauri AB also appears in the image to the upper-right of Proxima itself. Proxima b is a little more massive than the Earth and orbits in the habitable zone around Proxima Centauri, where the temperature is suitable for liquid water to exist on its surface.Astronomers using ESO telescopes and other facilities have found clear evidence of a planet orbiting the closest star to Earth, Proxima Centauri. The long-sought world, designated Proxima b, orbits its...

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US teens more likely to vape for flavorings than nicotine in e-cigarettes

US teens are more likely to vape for the flavourings found in e-cigarettes rather than nicotine, suggests research published online in the journal Tobacco Control.

Coffee drinking habits can be written in our DNA, study finds

Researchers have identified a gene that appears to curb coffee consumption.

Two NASA satellites take a bead on Gaston's movements

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Gaston in the Central Atlantic Ocean on Aug. 25 at 12:15 p.m. EDT (16:15 UTC).Gaston is currently sitting smack in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean churning away. Currently it is not near any landmasses and is at tropical storm status having weakened...

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Researchers report new Zika complication

Dr. John England, Professor and Chair of Neurology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and colleagues in Honduras and Venezuela have reported a new neurological complication of infection...

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Researchers succeed in developing a genome editing technique that does not cleave DNA

Deaminase is attached by a linker to nuclease-deficient CRISPR/Cas9. Guide RNA recognizes the DNA sequence of target genome and the deaminase modifies the base of the unwound DNA.A team involving Kobe University researchers has succeeded in developing Target-AID, a genome editing technique that does not cleave the DNA. The technique offers, through high-level editing operation, a method...

Ecological consequences of amphetamine pollution in urban streams

Sylvia Lee sampling in the Gwynns Falls at Carroll Park. In the Gwynns Falls, some 65% of average flow can be attributed to untreated sewage from leaking infrastructure.(Millbrook, NY) Pharmaceutical and illicit drugs are present in streams in Baltimore, Maryland. At some sites, amphetamine concentrations are high enough to alter the base of the aquatic food web....

Typhoon Lionrock threatening Japan

NASA's Aqua satellite provided temperature data on Typhoon Lionrock on Aug. 25 at 12:41 p.m. EDT (1641 UTC) and strongest storms appear in purple, indicating coldest cloud tops.Depending on the intensity track of Typhoon Lionrock, it could pass over Japan with the strength of a lion or or the weakness of a lamb. The intensity track...

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