Placodes (spots stained in dark blue by the expression of an early developmental gene) are visible before the development of hair, scales and feathers in (from left to right) the mouse, the snake, the chicken and the crocodile.

Relationship quality tied to good health for young adults

For young people entering adulthood, high-quality relationships are associated with better physical and mental health, according to the results of a recently published study by a University at Buffalo-led research...

Computer sketches set to make online shopping much easier

A computer program that recognises sketches pioneered by scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) could help consumers shop more efficiently.

KM3NeT unveils detailed plans for largest neutrino telescope in the world

KM3NeT - a European collaboration pioneering the deployment of kilometre cubed arrays of neutrino detectors off the Mediterranean coast - has reported in detail on the scientific aims, technology and...

Volcanoes get quiet before they erupt!

The Tilca volcano in Nicaragua is erupting.When dormant volcanoes are about to erupt, they show some predictive characteristics--seismic activity beneath the volcano starts to increase, gas escapes through the vent, or the surrounding ground starts to...

Driverless cars: Who gets protected?

Driverless cars pose a quandary when it comes to safety. These autonomous vehicles are programmed with a set of safety rules, and it is not hard to construct a scenario...

TSRI scientists reveal single-neuron gene landscape of the human brain

Authors of the new <i>Science</i> study include (left to right) Yun Yung, Xiaoyan Sheng, Jerold Chun, Gwendolyn Kaeser and Allison Chen of The Scripps Research Institute.A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego) and Illumina, Inc., has completed the first large-scale assessment of single neuronal...

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Sea star death triggers ecological domino effect

A new study by Simon Fraser University marine ecologists Jessica Schultz, Ryan Cloutier and Isabelle Côté has discovered that a mass mortality of sea stars resulted in a domino effect...

Monkeys get more selective with age

This image shows a very old female Barbary macaque at "La For&ecirc;t des Singes" in Rocamadour, France.As people get older, they become choosier about how they spend their time and with whom they spend it. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on...

Migratory bears down in the dumps

A mother bear is with her three cubs at the Sarikamis garbage dump in eastern Turkey.University of Utah biologists working in Turkey discovered two surprising facts about a group of 16 brown bears: First, six of the bears seasonally migrated between feeding and breeding sites,...

New technique settles old debate on highest peaks in US Arctic

Mt Isto, the tallest peak in the US Arctic, shown as a 3-D visualization of fodar data. Yellow dots indicate position of some of the ground control GPS data collected during the climbing expedition. Closely spaced points are on the climb up, widely spaced points are on the ski down.Finding out which is the highest mountain in the US Arctic may be the last thing on your mind, unless you are an explorer who skis from the tallest peaks...

Beach replenishment helps protect against storm erosion during El Niño

Torrey Pines State Beach experienced some of the most extensive erosion in San Diego County during El Ni&ntilde;oA team of researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego compared sand levels on several San Diego beaches during the last seven winters. The...

'Amazing protein diversity' is discovered in the maize plant

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory researchers found 'amazing diversity' in the maize plant by extensively sampling messages copied from activated genes in these six portions, or 'tissues,' of the plant.The genome of the corn plant - or maize, as it's called almost everywhere except the US - "is a lot more exciting" than scientists have previously believed. So...

Female blue tits sing in the face of danger

Approaching predators cause the female blue tit to sing and not to fall quiet.Until now, the singing behaviour of songbirds had been mainly associated with competitive behaviour and the search for a partner. Moreover, males had long been considered to be the more...

Coal to solar: Retraining the energy workforce

Joshua Pearce's lab at Michigan Tech focuses on the accessibility of solar and 3-D printing technologies.As more coal-fired power plants are retired, industry workers are left without many options. There is a light at the end of the tunnel, though.

Hubble confirms new dark spot on Neptune

This new Hubble Space Telescope image confirms the presence of a dark vortex in the atmosphere of Neptune. On the left, the full visible-light image shows a dark vortex near and below a patch of bright clouds in the planet's southern hemisphere.  The dark spot measures roughly 3,000 miles across.  On the right, Neptune's dark vortices are typically only best seen at blue wavelengths.New images obtained on May 16, 2016, by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope confirm the presence of a dark vortex in the atmosphere of Neptune. Though similar features were seen during...

Probing giant planets' dark hydrogen

This is an illustration of the layer of dark hydrogen the team's lab mimicry indicates would be found beneath the surface of gas giant planets like Jupiter, courtesy of Stewart McWilliams.Hydrogen is the most-abundant element in the universe. It's also the simplest--sporting only a single electron in each atom. But that simplicity is deceptive, because there is still so much...

How well do facial recognition algorithms cope with a million strangers?

The MegaFace dataset contains 1 million images representing more than 690,000 unique people. It is the first benchmark that tests facial recognition algorithms at a million scale.In the last few years, several groups have announced that their facial recognition systems have achieved near-perfect accuracy rates, performing better than humans at picking the same face out of...

Good bacteria vital to coral reef survival

This image shows bleached and unbleached coral close-up.Scientists say good bacteria could be the key to keeping coral healthy, able to withstand the impacts of global warming and to secure the long-term survival of reefs worldwide.

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Sex with the lights on

When you're a firefly, finding "the one" can change the world.

Researchers discover new chemical sensing technique

University of Houston researchers report that for the first time, surface-enhanced near-infrared absorption (SENIRA) spectroscopy has been demonstrated for high sensitivity chemical detection.Researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new technique to determine the chemical composition of materials using near-infrared light.

New discoveries on evolution can save endangered species

Male and female of the beautiful demoiselle (<em>Calopteryx virgo</em>) in the so-called "mating wheel." Note the male's dark blue wings, while the female is brown.Traditionally, the evolutionary development of an insect species has been explained by the notion that the female insect chooses her male partner based on size and other factors, so-called assortative...

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