Spectacular supernova's mysteries revealed

New research by a team of UK and European-based astronomers is helping to solve the mystery of what caused a spectacular supernova in a galaxy 11 million light years away, seen earlier this year.

Severe drought is causing the western US to rise

The severe drought gripping the western United States in recent years is changing the landscape well beyond localized effects of water restrictions and browning lawns. Scientists at Scripps Institution of...

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules

Anyone who has suffered an injury can probably remember the after-effects, including pain, swelling or redness. These are signs that the body is fighting back against the injury. When tissue...

Viruses take down massive algal blooms, with big implications for climate

This is a location map. Black rectangle delineates the area shown in Figures 1B and 2. (B) Map of surface chlorophyll from June 22, 2012 (day 174), emphasizing the phytoplankton patch as a distinct area of high chlorophyll concentration. Thick black lines mark the main attracting Lagrangian coherent structures from calculation of finite-size Lyapunov exponents. To facilitate the presentation, we plotted only the highest 20 percent of FSLEs (for the entire FSLE field, see Figure 2C). Thin black contour outline region of strong Chl gradient is used to define patch boundaries. Magenta diamonds mark the position of Argo floats used for extracting the mixed layer depth in the patch vicinity. Green diamonds mark the location of the sampling stations.Algae might seem easy to ignore, but they are the ultimate source of all organic matter that marine animals depend upon. Humans are increasingly dependent on algae, too, to suck...

Marine protected areas might not be enough to help overfished reefs recover

Researchers donned snorkels and examined three marine areas in Fiji that had adjacent fished areas. The country has established no-fishing areas to protect its healthy habitats and also to allow damaged reefs to recover over time.Pacific corals and fish can both smell a bad neighborhood, and use that ability to avoid settling in damaged reefs.

Polio: Mutated virus breaches vaccine protection

Thanks to effective vaccination, polio is considered nearly eradicated. Each year only a few hundred people are stricken worldwide. However, scientists of the University of Bonn, together with colleagues from...

Electric sparks may alter evolution of lunar soil

The moon appears to be a tranquil place, but modeling done by University of New Hampshire and NASA scientists suggests that, over the eons, periodic storms of solar energetic particles...

Hacking Gmail with 92 percent success

A team of engineers have developed a method that allows them to successfully hack into apps up to 92 percent of the time.A team of researchers, including an assistant professor at the University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering, have identified a weakness believed to exist in Android, Windows and iOS...

Paleolithic 'escargot'

This image depicts Upper Palaeolithic combustion structure containing human collected and cooked land snails and carbonaceous sediments (A) and complete land snails recovered into the combustion structure BM (B).Paleolithic inhabitants of modern-day Spain may have eaten snails 10,000 years earlier than their Mediterranean neighbors, according to a study published August 20, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE...

Of bees, mites, and viruses

Honeybee colonies are dying at alarming rates worldwide. A variety of factors have been proposed to explain their decline, but the exact cause -- and how bees can be saved...

Delivery by drone

In the near future, the package that you ordered online may be deposited at your doorstep by a drone: Last December, online retailer Amazon announced plans to explore drone-based delivery,...

This is Yalda Uhls, University of California - Los Angeles. Find more on the study <a target="_blank"href="http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/in-our-digital-world-are-young-people-losing-the-ability-to-read-emotions">here</a>.

Cause of global warming hiatus found deep in the Atlantic Ocean

(Top) Global average surface temperatures, where black dots are yearly averages. Two flat periods (hiatus) are separated by rapid warming from 1976-1999.  (Middle) Observations of heat content, compared to the average, in the north Atlantic Ocean. (Bottom) Salinity of the seawater in the same part of the Atlantic. Higher salinity is seen to coincide with more ocean heat storage.Following rapid warming in the late 20th century, this century has so far seen surprisingly little increase in the average temperature at Earth's surface. At first this was a blip,...

Sunlight, not microbes, key to CO2 in Arctic

Terrestrial organic matter is shown spilling into a lake.The vast reservoir of carbon stored in Arctic permafrost is gradually being converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) after entering the freshwater system in a process thought to be controlled largely...

Calcium and reproduction go together

Everyone's heard of the birds and the bees. But that old expression leaves out the flowers that are being fertilized. The fertilization process for flowering plants is particularly complex and...

Canola genome sequence reveals evolutionary 'love triangle'

An international team of scientists including researchers from the University of Georgia recently published the genome of Brassica napus-commonly known as canola -- in the journal Science. Their discovery paves...

A breakthrough in imaging gold nanoparticles to atomic resolution by electron microscopy

This is a visualization of the atomic structure of the Au68 gold nanoparticle determined by electron microscopy. The colored spheres denote gold atoms in different crystal shells around the central axis (red). The background shows a collection of real-life electron microscopy data from which the single structure shown was reconstructed.Nanometre-scale gold particles are intensively investigated for application as catalysts, sensors, drug delivery devices, biological contrast agents and components in photonics and molecular electronics. Gaining knowledge of their atomic-scale structures,...

Orb-weaving spiders living in urban areas may be larger

This is a photo of an orb-weaving spider.A common orb-weaving spider may grow larger and have an increased ability to reproduce when living in urban areas, according to a study published August 20, 2014 in the open-access...

New research shows seals and sea lions likely spread tuberculosis to humans

New research shows that tuberculosis likely spread from humans in Africa to seals and sea lions that brought the disease to South America.Tuberculosis is one of the most persistent and deadliest infectious diseases in the world, killing one to two million people each year.

Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us: New study

Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us -- they are more extroverted, agreeable and open -- attributes that make them successful in the demanding, fast-paced and often stressful...

From dandruff to deep sea vents, an ecologically hyper-diverse fungus

A ubiquitous skin fungus linked to dandruff, eczema and other itchy, flaky maladies in humans has now been tracked to even further global reaches -- including Hawaiian coral reefs and...

Hot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesis

This photo shows the colors of the Leptolyngbya sp. strain of cyanobacteria cells (JSC-1) collected from a hot spring near Yellowstone National Park by Donald A. Bryant when grown in white fluorescent light (WL), green-filtered fluorescent light (GL), red light provided by 645-nm LEDs, or far-red light provided by 710-nm LEDs. Cyanobacteria are known to appear brown when they are grown in green light and to appear blue-green when they are grown in red light. Although the cells grown in red light and far-red light look similar, Bryant's research shows that the photosynthetic apparatus in these two cell types is quite different and is optimized to use light wavelengths longer than 700 nm.Bacteria growing in near darkness use a previously unknown process for harvesting energy and producing oxygen from sunlight, a research team led by a Penn State University scientist has discovered....

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