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This image depicts Terrence Sejnowski.

New species of mayfly discovered in India

These are larvae of <i>Labiobaetis soldani</i>.Scientists have discovered a new species of mayfly in the southern Western Ghats, a mountain range along the west coast of India. In fact, this is the first time that...

New hope for powdery mildew resistant barley

This is a scanning electron microscope image of a fungal haustorium (<i>Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei</i>) taken from inside the barley epidermal cell.New research at the University of Adelaide has opened the way for the development of new lines of barley with resistance to powdery mildew.

A tiny new species of frog from Brazil with a heroic name

This image shows the male holotype of the new species <i>Chiasmocleis quilombola<i>.The Atlantic Forest is a hotspot of biodiversity and one of the most species richness biome of anurans (frogs, tree-frogs, and toads) in the world. However, current levels of diversity...

Four billion-year-old chemistry in cells today

Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today according to scientists at the University of East Anglia.

York University researchers use bird 'backpacks' to put wood thrushes migration on the map

Thi is a Wood Thrush wearing a geolocator. Only the tip of the light stalk pokes through the feathers once the geolocator has settled on the bird.Migratory songbirds are disappearing, and though conservationists are examining several possible reasons such as climate change, loss of habitat, acid rain and light pollution, a key piece of the puzzle...

Bats use polarized light to navigate

Scientists have discovered that greater mouse-eared bats use polarisation patterns in the sky to navigate -- the first mammal that's known to do this.

Study provides insights into birds' migration routes

This is a songbird.By tracking hybrids between songbird species, investigators have found that migration routes are under genetic control and could be preventing interbreeding. The research, which is published in Ecology Letters, was...

Marmoset sequence sheds new light on primate biology and evolution

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset --...

National Xenopus resource at the MBL innovates new way to study proteins

This image shows <i>Xenopus laevis</i>, the African clawed frog.Proteomics, the study of large groups of proteins, can enhance our understanding of a wide range of organisms, with applications in medicine and developmental biology. Such analyses traditionally require a...

Scientists find way to trap, kill malaria parasite

Scientists may have found a way to imprison the malaria parasite in its protective chamber inside red blood cells. In the electron micrograph, the malaria parasites appear in blue and uninfected red blood cells are shown in red.Scientists may be able to entomb the malaria parasite in a prison of its own making, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report July 16 in...

New tools help neuroscientists analyze 'big data'

In an age of "big data," a single computer cannot always find the solution a user wants. Computational tasks must instead be distributed across a cluster of computers that analyze a massive data set together. It's how Facebook and Google...

The microbes make the sake brewery

A sake brewery has its own microbial terroir, meaning the microbial populations found on surfaces in the facility resemble those found in the product, creating the final flavor according to...

Global wildlife decline driving slave labor, organized crime

A child grabs sleep wherever possible after a long day of labor in West Africa's struggling fishery.Global decline of wildlife populations is driving increases in violent conflicts, organized crime and child labor around the world, according to a policy paper led by researchers at the University...

No returning to Eden: Researchers explore how to restore species in a changing world

Reversing the increasing rate of global biodiversity losses may not be possible without embracing intensive, and sometimes controversial, forms of threatened species management, according to a New Zealand zoologist and...

Newly discovered gut virus lives in half the world's population

Odds are, there's a virus living inside your gut that has gone undetected by scientists for decades. A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University has found...

Alaska frogs reach record lows in extreme temperature survival

An Alaska wood frog creates a hibernacula from duff and leaf litter in a spruce forest on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus in preparation for the long winter freeze.Freezing and thawing might not be good for the average steak, but it seems to help wood frogs each fall as they prepare to survive Alaska's winter cold.

Seals forage at offshore wind farms

This is an aerial view of Sheringham Shoal wind farm.By using sophisticated GPS tracking to monitor seals' every movement, researchers have shown for the first time that some individuals are repeatedly drawn to offshore wind farms and pipelines. Those...

Genetic risk for autism stems mostly from common genes

The bulk of risk, or liability, for autism spectrum disorders was traced to inherited variations in the genetic code shared by many people. These and other (unaccounted) factors dwarfed contributions from rare inherited, non-additive and spontaneous (de novo) genetic factors.Using new statistical tools, Carnegie Mellon University's Kathryn Roeder has led an international team of researchers to discover that most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of...

Speedy computation enables scientists to reconstruct an animal's development cell by cell

This is digital fruit fly embryo, reconstructed from live imaging data recorded with a SiMView light-sheet microscope (top: dorsal view, bottom: ventral view). Each colored circle in the image shows one of the embryo's cells, and the corresponding tail indicates that cell's movement over a short time interval during early embryogenesis (at around 3 hours post-fertilization). The information on cell positions and movements throughout the embryo was reconstructed using a computational framework for automated cell tracking. Color encodes the developmental origin of each cell in the early embryo.Recent advances in imaging technology are transforming how scientists see the cellular universe, showing the form and movement of once grainy and blurred structures in stunning detail. But extracting the...

Eradicating fatal sleeping sickness by killing off the tsetse fly

This image shows a Tsetse fly in front of a computer model of the insect's movement patterns.A BYU ecologist is playing a role in the effort to curb a deadly disease affecting developing nations across equatorial Africa.

Whale shark fringe migration

At the fringe of the whale shark range, the volcanic Azore islands may play an increasing role for the north Atlantic population as sea surface temperatures rise, according to a...

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