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Camera-traps capture wild chimps' nighttime raiding activities

Wild chimpanzees living in disturbed habitat may use innovative strategies, like foraging crops at night, to coexist with nearby human activities, according to a study published October 22, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sabrina Krief from Muséum...

Rescued 'abandoned' penguin chicks survival similar to colony rates

Abandoned penguin chicks that were hand-reared and returned to the wild showed a similar survival rate to their naturally-reared counterparts, according to a study published October 22, 2014 in the...

Physicists solve longstanding puzzle of how moths find distant mates

The way in which male moths locate females flying hundreds of meters away has long been a mystery to scientists.

John Lennon commemorated by naming a new tarantula species from South America after him

A newly described tarantula species from Western Brazilian Amazonia was named Bumba lennoni in honor of John Lennon, a founder member of the legendary band the Beatles. The new species...

University of Tennessee study finds fish just wanna have fun

A cichlid fish strikes a bottom-weighted thermometer that would immediately right itself. It was often struck repeatedly in bouts.Fish just want to have fun, according to a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, study that finds even fish "play."

Blind cave fish may provide insight on eye disease and other human health issues

Blind cave fish may not be the first thing that comes to mind when it comes to understanding human sight, but recent research indicates they may have quite a bit...

Cell architecture: Finding common ground

When it comes to cellular architecture, function follows form.

Follow the leader: Insects benefit from good leadership too

Sawfly larvae are shown on a Eucalyptus tree.Scientists have shown for the first time that when insect larvae follow a leader to forage for food, both leaders and followers benefit, growing much faster than if they are...

How the fruit fly could help us sniff out drugs and bombs

The "nose" of a fruit fly can identify odors from illicit drugs and explosives almost as accurately as wine odor.A fly's sense of smell could be used in new technology to detect drugs and bombs, new University of Sussex research has found.

New sequencing reveals genetic history of tomatoes

The sequencing of 360 varieties of wild and domestic tomatoes has yielded insights into domestication and pest resistance.This week, an international team of researchers, led by the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Beijing, is publishing in the journal Nature Genetics a brief genomic history of tomato...

Taking infestation with a grain of salt

The Living Coast Discovery Center and Sweetwater Marsh, as seen from the marsh's tidal zone.Twenty years ago, biologists Kathy Boyer and Joy Zedler, then researchers at San Diego State University, speculated that too many insects feeding on cordgrass in the marshes of San Diego...

Fast modeling of cancer mutations

Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of genetic mutations linked with cancer. However, sifting through this deluge of information to figure out which of these mutations actually drive cancer growth has proven to be a tedious, time-consuming...

Secret wing colors attract female fruit flies

This is a male <i>Drosophila melanogaster</i> fruit fly.Bright colors appear on a fruit fly's transparent wings against a dark background as a result of light refraction. Researchers from Lund University in Sweden have now demonstrated that females...

Tarantula venom illuminates electrical activity in live cells

The UC Davis research team includes (from left to right) Vladimir Yarov-Yarovoy, Daniel Austin, Sebastian Fletcher-Taylor, Jon Sack and Kenneth S. Eum, who passed away earlier this year. The team has dedicated the work to his memory. 'Ken was a talented postdoctoral student, a driven and caring soul who brought joy to the lives of those who knew him,' they said.Researchers at the University of California, Davis, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, have created a cellular probe that combines a tarantula toxin with...

BOFFFFs (big, old, fat, fertile, female fish) sustain fisheries

This is a a big (1.1 m), old (ca.100 years), fat (27.2 kg), fertile female fish, in this case a shortraker rockfish (<i>Sebastes borealis</i>) taken off Alaska.  New research from the University of Hawaii at Manoa indicates that so-called BOFFFFs sustain fisheries.Recreational fishermen prize large trophy fish. Commercial fishing gear targets big fish. After all, larger fish feed the egos of humans as well as their bellies.

Built-in billboards: Male bluefin killifish signal different things with different fins

The pigment melanin contributes to the black edges (b) on the anal fin that are a sign of dominance, while pterins account for the red and yellow colors (a) on the anal fin, and signal health. Carotenoids on the caudal fin (c) indicate that the fish is eating well. Brighter, more-intense colors are associated with better mating success.They help fish swim, but fins also advertise a fish's social standing and health. In a new study, researchers report that for the male bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei), each colorful...

New Univeristy of Virginia study upends current theories of how mitochondria began

Parasitic bacteria were the first cousins of the mitochondria that power cells in animals and plants -- and first acted as energy parasites in those cells before becoming beneficial, according...

Loss of big predators could leave herbivores in a thorny situation

This image shows impala (antelope), Mpala Research Center, Laikipia, Kenya.Global declines in carnivore populations could embolden plant eaters to increasingly dine on succulent vegetation, driving losses in plant and tree biodiversity, according to UBC research published today in Science.

Could sleeper sharks be preying on protected Steller sea lions?

This image depicts sea lions in Alaska.Pacific sleeper sharks, a large, slow-moving species thought of as primarily a scavenger or predator of fish, may be preying on something a bit larger -- protected Steller sea lions...

New 'tree of life' traces evolution of a mysterious cotinga birds

They are some of the brightest, loudest, oddest-looking, least-understood birds on the planet. Some have bulbous crests, long fleshy wattles, or Elvis-worthy pompadours in addition to electric blue, deep purple,...

Fly genome could help us improve health and our environment

The house fly might be a worldwide pest, but its genome will provide information that could improve our lives. From insights into pathogen immunity, to pest control and decomposing waste,...

Discovery of cellular snooze button advances cancer and biofuel research

The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of Michigan State University scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer.The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of Michigan State University scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer.

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