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Colorado potato beetle (<i>Leptinotarsa decemlineata</i>): On average 40 to 50 cm2 of leaf material are eaten by each of the beetles' larvae. Infestation with Colorado potato beetles can result in crop losses up to 50 percent, if there is no pest control.

Study affirms role of specialized protein in assuring normal cell development

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center and New York University have demonstrated that a specialized DNA-binding protein called CTCF is essential for the precise expression of genes that control the...

Malaria plays hide-and-seek with immune system by using long noncoding RNA to switch genes

Breaking the code of malaria parasite's immune evasion: Prof. Ron Dzikowski and Ph.D. student Inbar Amit-Avraham at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.Up to one million people ¾ mainly pregnant woman and young children ¾ are killed each year by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite, which causes the most devastating form of human...

Carnivorous plant packs big wonders into tiny genome

This is a scanning electron micrograph of the bladder of <i>Utricularia gibba</i>, the humped bladderwort plant (color added). The plant is a voracious carnivore, with its tiny, 1-millimeter-long bladders leveraging vacuum pressure to suck in tiny prey at great speed.Great, wonderful, wacky things can come in small genomic packages.

Retracing the roots of fungal symbioses

With apologies to the poet John Donne, and based on recent work from the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a DOE Office of Science user facility,...

Antibiotics give rise to new communities of harmful bacteria

Most people have taken an antibiotic to treat a bacterial infection. Now researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of San Diego, La Jolla,...

Evolving a bigger brain with human DNA

The human version of a DNA sequence called HARE5 turns on a gene important for brain development (gene activity is stained blue), and causes a mouse embryo to grow a 12 percent larger brain by the end of pregnancy than an embryo injected with the chimpanzee version of HARE5.The size of the human brain expanded dramatically during the course of evolution, imparting us with unique capabilities to use abstract language and do complex math. But how did the...

Animals tend to evolve toward larger size over time, Stanford study finds

Prof. Jonathan Payne (right) and Noel Heim, a postdoctoral researcher in Payne's lab, stand next to stacks of the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, which they recently used to provide fresh evidence of Cope's rule.Does evolution follow certain rules? If, in the words of the famed evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould, one could "rewind the tape of life," would certain biological trends reemerge? Asked...

Epigenomics of Alzheimer's disease progression

Our susceptibility to disease depends both on the genes that we inherit from our parents and on our lifetime experiences. These two components -- nature and nurture -- seem to...

Related science articles

Bee disease reduced by nature's 'medicine cabinet,' Dartmouth-led study finds

A bumble bee collecting nectar containing iridoid glycoside secondary metabolites from a turtlehead flower.Nicotine isn't healthy for people, but such naturally occurring chemicals found in flowers of tobacco and other plants could be just the right prescription for ailing bees, according to a...

Mothers can pass traits to offspring through bacteria's DNA

Herbert W. Virgin, MD, PhD (left), and Thad Stappenbeck, MD, PhD, have shown that mothers can pass a trait to their offspring through the DNA of bacteria. The finding suggests that microbes may play a significant role in how genes influence illness and health in higher organisms.It's a firmly established fact straight from Biology 101: Traits such as eye color and height are passed from one generation to the next through the parents' DNA.

Amphibian chytrid fungus reaches Madagascar

<i>Boophis quasiboehmei</i> is from the Ranomafana National Park in Southeast Madagascar.The chytrid fungus, which is fatal to amphibians, has been detected in Madagascar for the first time. This means that the chytridiomycosis pandemic, which has been largely responsible for the...

Sharp rise in experimental animal research in US

The use of animals in experimental research has soared at leading US laboratories in recent years, finds research published online in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Climate-change clues from the turtles of tropical Wyoming

University of Florida paleontologist Jason Bourque reconstructs the 56-million-year-old shell of a newly described genus and species of ancient tropical turtle in his lab on Feb. 9, 2015. The fossil turtle gives clues to how today's species might react to warming habitats.Tropical turtle fossils discovered in Wyoming by University of Florida scientists reveal that when Earth got warmer, prehistoric turtles headed north. But if today's turtles try the same technique to...

Small predator diversity is an important part of a healthy ecosystem

Biodiversity, including small predators such as dragonflies and other aquatic bugs that attack and consume parasites, may improve the health of amphibians, according to a team of researchers. Amphibians have...

Scientists discover bacteria in marine sponges harvest phosphorus for the reef community

Cyanobacteria strains (<i>Leptolyngbya</i>) isolated from the black ball marine sponge (<i>Ircinia strobilina</i>) with intracellular polyphosphate granules in yellow fluorescence.Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making...

Flawed method puts tiger rise in doubt, calls for new approach

Flaws in a method commonly used in censuses of tigers and other rare wildlife put the accuracy of such surveys in doubt, a study led by Oxford University researchers suggests.Flaws in a method commonly used in censuses of tigers and other rare wildlife put the accuracy of such surveys in doubt, a new study suggests.

Gene may help reduce GM contamination

Genetically modified crops have long drawn fire from opponents worried about potential contamination of conventional crops and other plants. Now a plant gene discovered by University of Guelph scientists might...

Proteins pull together as cells divide

A cleavage furrow begins to separate a dividing cell into daughter cells.Like a surgeon separating conjoined twins, cells have to be careful to get everything just right when they divide in two. Otherwise, the resulting daughter cells could be hobbled, particularly...

Autism genes activate during fetal brain development

Autism mutations may influence brain size through RhoA pathway during fetal brain development.Scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found that mutations that cause autism in children are connected to a pathway that regulates brain development. The...

Study details impact of Deepwater Horizon oil on beach microbial communities

Researchers are shown gathering samples of microbial communities in layers of sand containing oil. They found that the perturbation led to growth of a succession of microbes that broke down portions of the oil over time.When oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill first began washing ashore on Pensacola Municipal Beach in June 2010, populations of sensitive microorganisms, including those that capture sunlight or fix nitrogen...

Genetic evidence shows penguins have 'bad taste'

This is a king penguin.Penguins apparently can't enjoy or even detect the savory taste of the fish they eat or the sweet taste of fruit. A new analysis of the genetic evidence reported in...

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