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Seaweed that has undergone beaching.

The discovery of a totally new kind of 'mark' in human cell nucleus

It was accepted that histone acetylation modifications are implicated only in gene activation "switch on".A Japanese research group verified the presence of a protein modification that is a unique mark in human cell nucleus. This protein modification, Histone H4 lysine 20 acetylation (H4K20ac), was...

Pea plants demonstrate ability to 'gamble' -- a first in plants

An international team of scientists from Oxford University, UK, and Tel-Hai College, Israel, has shown that pea plants can demonstrate sensitivity to risk - namely, that they can make adaptive...

In times of great famine, microalgae digest themselves

Bremerhaven/Germany, June 30th, 2016. In a recent study, scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have determined the molecular mechanisms which microalgae...

Thousands on one chip: New method to study proteins

Protein microarrays like this allow the investigation of thousands of proteins in a single experiment. Microarrays are only a few centimeters in size and host thousands of individual test spots on very small space.Since the completion of the human genome an important goal has been to elucidate the function of the now known proteins: a new molecular method enables the investigation of the...

Twisting and turning to target antibiotic resistance

MD2 (purple) binds to MraY (green) like a two-pronged plug inserting into a socket. This ultimately inhibits the formation of a substance that gives the bacterial cell wall its structural strength.Researchers are getting closer to understanding how some natural antibiotics work so they can develop drugs that mimic them.

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Baby fish lose poisonous protectors in acidified oceans

Juvenile fish shelter within the tentacles of a jellyfish. Predicted ocean acidification will upset this symbiotic relationship.A common close partnership which sees baby fish sheltering from predators among the poisonous tentacles of jellyfish will be harmed under predicted ocean acidification, a new University of Adelaide study...

See and sort: Developing novel techniques to visualize uncultured microbial cell activity

Many uncultured microbes play unknown roles in regulating Earth's biogeochemical processes; everything from regulating plant health to driving nutrient cycles in both terrestrial and marine environments, processes that can impact...

Pipelines affect health, fitness of salmon, study finds

Pipelines carrying crude oil to ports in British Columbia may spell bad news for salmon, according to a new University of Guelph-led study.

World's first successful artificial insemination of southern rockhopper penguin

A southern rockhopper penguin chick conceived through artificial insemination.DNA tests have confirmed that one of the three southern rockhopper penguin chicks born at Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan between June 4 and 6 was conceived through artificial insemination. This is...

Study shows trees with altered lignin are better for biofuels

Click on the image to download a high-resolution version. Postdoctoral associate Yuanheng Cai, biological research associate Xuebin Zhang, and plant biochemist Chang-Jun Liu are in the Brookhaven Lab greenhouse with transgenic trees designed to improve biofuel production.Lignin is a natural component of plant cell walls, the scaffolding that surrounds each cell and plays a pivotal role in plants' ability to grow against gravity and reach heights...

Gene amplification -- the fast track to infection

Illustration of the discovery by Ume&aring; researchers. To the left: inactive <i>Yersinia</i> bacteria with just one ring-shaped DNA strand cannot cause infection. To the right: active <i>Yersinia</i> bacteria with multiple DNA plasmids which can cause intestinal disease in the mouse.Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden are first to discover that bacteria can multiply disease-inducing genes which are needed to rapidly cause infection. The results were published in Science on...

Climate change's effect on Rocky Mountain plant is driven by sex

For the valerian plant, higher elevations in the Colorado Rocky Mountains are becoming much more co-ed. And the primary reason appears to be climate change.

What does the sperm whale say?

Researchers using a pole to tag a sperm whale off the Azores.When a team of researchers began listening in on seven sperm whales in the waters off the Azores, they discovered that the whales' characteristic tapping sounds serve as a form...

Fruit flies adjust to sudden drops in temperature; just keep buzzing about the fruit bowl

This is a close up of the common fruit fly usually found buzzing around the fruit bowl.Fruit flies may seem simple, but these common visitors to the fruit bowl can drastically alter their gene expression and metabolism to respond to temperature changes in their environment, an...

Jasmonate-deficient tobacco plants attract herbivorous mammals

A gopher (<i>Geomiydae</i>) pulls a branch of <i>Nicotiana attenuata</i> into its nest. In nature, the plants are well protected against mammalian herbivory by nicotine, a neurotoxic substance. If the plants lack the hormone that regulates nicotine production, they become an attractive food source for many mammals, as shown in experiments with genetically modified plants.Coyote tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata) produces a potent neurotoxic substance: nicotine. The production of nicotine is regulated by plant hormones called jasmonates. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology...

Boston subway system covered in microbes, but they're not harmful

Boston's subway system, known as the T, might be just as bacteria-laden as you'd expect but organisms found there are largely from normal human skin and incapable of causing disease,...

Freiburg biologists explain function of Pentagone

Co-receptors (red) are located on the surfaces of the cells. Pentagone causes the co-receptors to become internalized and degraded within the cell (yellow/green).How do the cells in a human embryo know where they are located in the body and how they should develop? Why do certain cells form a finger while others...

'Bugs' on the subway: Monitoring the microbial environment to improve public health

The trillions of microbes that transfer from people to surfaces could provide an early warning system for the emergence of public health threats such as a flu outbreak or a...

Lost hormone is found in starfish

Biologists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered that the evolutionary history of a hormone responsible for sexual maturity in humans is written in the genes of the...

Computer model demonstrates how human spleen filters blood

Researchers, led by Carnegie Mellon University President Subra Suresh and MIT Principal Research Scientist Ming Dao, have created a new computer model that shows how tiny slits in the spleen...

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