Popular Science articles about Health & Medicine

The Lancet: Scientists announce final trial results of the world's most advanced malaria vaccine

The first malaria vaccine candidate (RTS,S/AS01) to reach phase 3 clinical testing is partially effective against clinical disease in young African children up to 4 years after vaccination, according to final trial data, published in The Lancet. The results suggest...

New study unravels why common blood pressure medicine can fail

Every year, more than 120 million prescriptions are written worldwide for thiazide drugs, a group of salt-lowering medicines used to treat high blood pressure. These drugs are often very effective,...

Immune system protein regulates sensitivity to bitter taste

New research from the Monell Center reveals that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), an immune system regulatory protein that promotes inflammation, also helps regulate sensitivity to bitter taste. The finding may...

Seeking new targets for ovarian cancer treatment

Identifying molecular changes that occur in tissue after chemotherapy could be crucial in advancing treatments for ovarian cancer, according to research from Magee-Womens Research Institute and Foundation (MWRIF) and the...

Researchers make key malarial drug-resistence finding

According to the World Health Organization's 2014 World Malaria Report, there are an estimated 198 million cases of malaria worldwide with 3.3 billion people at risk for contracting the infection....

Detecting cryptosporidium in China

This is the microfluidic chip, with a diagram of its channels and antigen-labeling process.For a healthy individual, an infection of Cryptosporidium parvum may mean nothing more than a few days of bad diarrhea. For someone with a compromised immune system, it can mean...

Medical marijuana liquid extract may bring hope for children with severe epilepsy

A medicinal liquid form of marijuana may show promise as a treatment for children with severe epilepsy that is not responding to other treatments, according to a study released today...

What's in your wine? New study reveals how production methods affect color and taste of pinot noir

The taste and color of your wine depends on the methods used to produce it and the chemicals added during production, says research published in Analytical Chemistry Research. The researchers...

Biologists identify brain tumor weakness

Biologists at MIT and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research have discovered a vulnerability of brain cancer cells that could be exploited to develop more-effective drugs against brain tumors.

Food allergies can be transmitted from blood products to children in rare cases

In rare cases, children can develop anaphylactic allergies to previously tolerated foods after receiving blood products via transfusion, report the authors of a case study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical...

Just hit 'print': Office inkjet printer could produce simple tool to identify infectious diseases

A) Making paper sensors using a regular inkjet printer with cartridge containing DNA-based bio-irk. B) The paper sensor is simple to use -- add a droplet of test sample and look for the right text to show up. (C) A real sensor designed to detect two biomarkers, ATP ( a small-molecule biomarker for bacteria) and PDGF (a protein biomarker for cancer). 'A' lights up when ATP is present and 'P' lights up when the test sample has PDGF.Consumers are one step closer to benefiting from packaging that could give simple text warnings when food is contaminated with deadly pathogens like E. coli and Salmonella, and patients could...

This is a 3-D image of the left brain hemisphere of a patient with tinnitus (right) and the part of that hemisphere containing primary auditory cortex (left). Black dots indicate all the sites recorded from. Colored circles indicate electrodes at which the strength of ongoing brain activity correlated with the current strength of tinnitus perceived by the patient. Different colors indicate different frequencies of brain activity (blue = low, magenta = middle, orange = high) whose strength changed alongside tinnitus. Green squares indicate sites where the interaction between these different frequencies changed alongside changes in tinnitus.

Flame retardants could contribute to hyperthyroidism in older cats

For years, health advocates have been pushing to ban some flame retardants for their potentially harmful effects, especially on young children and infants. Now scientists report these compounds could play...

Throwing light on how to conduct a personalized pancreas cancer clinical trial

This is one of the leaders of the Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy trial, or IMPaCT trial, medical oncologist Dr. Lorraine Chantrill.After performing thousands of unsuccessful experiments in his attempt to perfect the light bulb, Thomas Edison famously remarked: "I have not failed, not once. I've discovered ten thousand ways that...

Study reveals a cause of poorer outcomes for African-American patients with breast cancer

Poorer outcomes for African-American women with estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, compared with European-American patients, appears to be due, in part, to a strong survival mechanism within the cancer cells,...

NYU researchers find diabetes perceptions vary according to risk factors

Recent research published in The Diabetes Educator by Dr. Shiela Strauss, associate professor of nursing and co-director of the Statistics and Data Management Core for NYU's Colleges of Nursing and...

Genetically engineered Salmonella promising as anti-cancer therapy

A new study has demonstrated that genetically modified Salmonella can be used to kill cancer cells. The study is published in this week's issue of mBio, an American Society for...

The placebome: Where genetics and the placebo effect meet

Placebos have helped to ease symptoms of illness for centuries and have been a fundamental component of clinical research to test new drug therapies for more than 70 years. But...

HPV vaccination of adolescent boys may be cost-effective for preventing oropharyngeal cancer

A new study indicates that vaccinating 12-year-old boys against the humanpapilloma virus (HPV) may be a cost-effective strategy for preventing oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer, a cancer that starts at the...

A third of breast cancer patients concerned about genetic risk

This is Reshma Jagsi, M.D., D.Phil.A new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds that many women diagnosed with breast cancer are concerned about the genetic risk of developing other cancers themselves...

Purging a virus from organ transplants

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an extremely common virus, which as other members of the herpes virus family causes life-long infections in humans. Most individuals are exposed to HCMV during childhood,...

No evidence that low-frequency magnetic fields accelerate development of Alzheimer's, ALS

In the case of animal model Alzheimer's disease, age-related deposits of amyloid-beta protein develop in the brain. This protein can be labeled and thus made visible under a fluorescence microscope.Low-frequency alternating magnetic fields such as those generated by overhead power lines are considered a potential health risk because epidemiological studies indicate that they may aggravate, among other things, neurodegenerative...

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