Popular Science articles about Health & Medicine

Stefan Duma, head of Virginia Tech's Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanic and the Harry Wyatt Professor in Engineering, has spearheaded research in injury biomechanics within athletics, military combat, and vehicular crashes for more than a decade.

Scientists link unexplained childhood paralysis to enterovirus D68

This is a three-dimensional image of enterovirus D68 (center) reconstructed from cryo-electron micrographs (background).A research team led by UC San Francisco scientists has found the genetic signature of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in half of California and Colorado children diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis...

Short bouts of high-intensity exercise before a fatty meal best for vascular health

A short burst of intensive exercise before eating a high fat meal is better for blood vessel function in young people than the currently recommended moderate-intensity exercise, according to a...

Ebola whole virus vaccine shown effective, safe in primates

An Ebola whole virus vaccine, constructed using a novel experimental platform, has been shown to effectively protect monkeys exposed to the often fatal virus.

Recipe for antibacterial plastic: Plastic plus egg whites

Alex Jones, a doctoral student in the department of textiles, merchandising and interiors at the University of Georgia, is studying the antibacterial properties of bioplastics. He's found that albumin, a protein found in egg whites, looks the most promising.Bioplastics made from protein sources such as albumin and whey have shown significant antibacterial properties, findings that could eventually lead to their use in plastics used in medical applications such...

Wearable device helps vision-impaired avoid collision

Gang Luo, Ph.D., Associate Scientist at Mass. Eye and Ear/Schepens, and Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School, adjusts the wearable device that his team created to help those who are visually impaired avoid collision while walking.People who have lost some of their peripheral vision, such as those with retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, or brain injury that causes half visual field loss, often face mobility challenges and...

Drinking raw milk dramatically increases risk for foodborne illness, analysis finds

An analysis conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) found that the risks of drinking raw (unpasteurized) cow's milk are significant. Consumers are nearly...

A call for more research on brain damage in American football

More research is needed to identify how athletes sustain brain injury from American football, and also to develop strategies to protect them, write experts in The BMJ today.

Insuring undocumented residents could help solve multiple US health care challenges

Latinos are the largest ethnic minority group in the United States, and it's expected that by 2050 they will comprise almost 30 percent of the U.S. population. Yet they are...

New molecular tool assesses vaginal microbiome health, diagnoses infections -- fast

A new microarray-based tool, called VaginArray, offers the potential to provide a fast, reliable and low-cost assessment of vaginal health and diagnoses of infections. The research is published ahead of...

Low vaccination rates fuel the 2015 measles outbreak

Inadequate vaccine coverage is likely a driving force behind the ongoing Disneyland measles outbreak, according to calculations by a research team at Boston Children's Hospital. Their report, based on epidemiological...

Pesticides in fruit and vegetables linked to semen quality

The first study to investigate the relationship between eating fruit and vegetables containing pesticide residues and the quality of men's semen has shown a link with lower sperm counts and percentages of normally-formed sperm.

Prototype 'nanoneedles' generate new blood vessels in mice

The image shows human cells (green) on the nanoneedles (orange), which has DNA injected into the cells' nuclei (Blue). The image was taken by the researchers using optical microscopy.Scientists have developed tiny 'nanoneedles' that have successfully prompted parts of the body to generate new blood vessels, in a trial in mice.

Fecal transplants successful for treating C. difficile infection

Distasteful though it sounds, the transplantation of fecal matter is more successful for treating Clostridium difficile infections than previously thought.

Notre Dame researchers develop computational model to simulate bacterial behavior

University of Notre Dame applied mathematician Mark Alber and environmental biotechnologist Robert Nerenberg have developed a new computational model that effectively simulates the mechanical behavior of biofilms. Their model may...

Common bacteria on verge of becoming antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Bacteria that cause many hospital-associated infections are ready to quickly share genes that allow them to resist powerful antibiotics. The illustration, based on electron micrographs and created by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shows one of these antibiotic-resistant bacteria.Antibiotic resistance is poised to spread globally among bacteria frequently implicated in respiratory and urinary infections in hospital settings, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in...

Antibiotic effectiveness imperiled as use in livestock expected to increase

Princeton University-led research found that antibiotic consumption in livestock worldwide could rise by 67 percent between 2010 and 2030, and possibly endanger the effectiveness of antimicrobials in humans. Pigs outpace chickens and cattle in estimates of antimicrobial consumption in countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, which is a consortium of 34 nations that includes the United States and most of the European Union countries. The graph measures antibiotic consumption in milligrams (bottom bar) in cattle, chickens and pork per population correction unit, or PCU, which corresponds to 1 kilogram of the respective animal. The average amount of antibiotics increases from left to right. The researchers found that pigs could consume an average 172 mg of antibiotics per kilogram of animal compared to 148 mg for chickens and 45 mg for cattle.Antibiotic consumption in livestock worldwide could rise by 67 percent between 2010 and 2030, and possibly endanger the effectiveness of antimicrobials in humans, according to researchers from Princeton University, the...

Bariatric surgery before joint replacement can improve outcomes in obese patients

This is Emily Dodwell, MD.Obesity is not only a risk factor for developing knee and hip arthritis. It is also linked to less favorable outcomes after joint replacement surgery. Two new studies at Hospital...

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Brain tumor cells decimated by mitochondrial 'smart bomb'

The new drug MP-MUS (yellow) attacks cancer cell mitochondria by infiltrating both inner and outer membranes (green) after being converted from an inactive, non-toxic form to an active, toxic form by the enzyme MAO-B (purple). Once inside, the drug damages mitochondrial DNA, which cannot be repaired.An experimental drug that attacks brain tumor tissue by crippling the cells' energy source called the mitochondria has passed early tests in animal models and human tissue cultures, say Houston...

Scientists grow 'mini-lungs' to aid the study of cystic fibrosis

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have successfully created 'mini-lungs' using stem cells derived from skin cells of patients with cystic fibrosis, and have shown that these can be used...

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Frequency of blood tests in heart surgery patients may lead to anemia, transfusions

Laboratory testing among patients undergoing cardiac surgery can lead to excessive bloodletting, which can increase the risk of developing hospital-acquired anemia and the need for blood transfusion, according to an...

Oncologists reveal reasons for high cost of cancer drugs in the US, recommend solutions

Increasingly high prices for cancer drugs are affecting patient care in the U.S. and the American health care system overall, say the authors of a special article published online in...

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