Popular Science articles about Health & Medicine

The complete structure allows researchers to understand how the polymerase uses host cell RNA (red) to kick-start the production of viral messenger RNA.

The dirty side of soap

Triclosan is an antimicrobial additive found in many liquid hand soaps and other household products.Triclosan is an antimicrobial commonly found in soaps, shampoos, toothpastes and many other household items. Despite its widespread use, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report...

Bio-inspired bleeding control

This is an artist's rendering of synthetic platelets.Stanching the free flow of blood from an injury remains a holy grail of clinical medicine. Controlling blood flow is a primary concern and first line of defense for patients...

Study finds laundry detergent pods, serious poisoning risk for children

Laundry detergent pods began appearing on U.S. store shelves in early 2012, and people have used them in growing numbers ever since. The small packets can be tossed into a...

Researchers develop new model to study epidemics

For decades, scientists have been perfecting models of how contagions spread, but newly published research takes the first steps into building a model that includes the loop linking individual human...

Antibiotics: On-the-spot tests reduce unnecessary prescriptions

Fast, on-the-spot tests for bacterial infections may help to reduce excessive antibiotic use. A systematic review published in The Cochrane Library, found that when doctors tested for the presence of...

PNAS: From HIV to cancer, IL-37 regulates immune system

Mayumi Fujita, M.D., Ph.D., investigator at the University of Colorado Cancer Center shows that IL-37 regulates immune sensitivity across disease types.A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in a recent issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences describes the activity of a recently discovered communication molecule of...

Nasal spray vaccine has potential for long-lasting protection from Ebola virus

A nasal vaccine in development by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin has been shown to provide long-term protection for non-human primates against the deadly Ebola virus. Results...

Increased prevalence in autism diagnoses linked to reporting in Denmark

About 60 percent of the increase in the observed prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in Danish children appears to be largely due to changes in reporting practices, according to...

Viewing cancer on the move: New device yields close-up look at metastasis

This dish houses a lab chip that Johns Hopkins engineers built to gain an unprecedented close-up view of how cancer cells enter the bloodstream to spread the disease.Johns Hopkins engineers have invented a lab device to give cancer researchers an unprecedented microscopic look at metastasis, the complex way that tumor cells spread through the body, causing more...

Genetic factors behind surviving or dying from Ebola shown in mouse study

Angela Rasmussen and Michael Katze in their University of Washington microbiology and systems biology lab where they study host/virus interactions. Behind them is robotic equipment  used to perform standard lab procedures.A newly developed mouse model suggests that genetic factors are behind the mild-to-deadly range of reactions to the Ebola virus.

Trans fat consumption is linked to diminished memory in working-aged adults

High trans fat consumption is linked to worse memory among working-age men, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014.

Cutting-edge computer software helps pinpoint aggressiveness of breast cancer tumors

Researchers at Western University are using cutting-edge genetic mutation-analysis software developed in their lab to interpret mutations in tumour genome that may provide insight into determining which breast cancer tumours...

Overall risk of birth defects appears low for women taking antiretrovirals during early pregnancy

Among pregnant women infected with HIV, the use of antiretroviral (ARV) medications early in pregnancy to treat their HIV or to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV does not appear to...

Transplant of stem-cell-derived dopamine neurons shows promise for Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease is an incurable movement disorder that affects millions of people around the world, but current treatment options can cause severe side effects and lose effectiveness over time. In...

High-fat diet postponing brain aging

New Danish-led research suggests that signs of brain aging can be postponed in mice if placed on a high-fat diet. In the long term, this opens the possibility of treatment...

Study finds Google glasses may partially obstruct peripheral vision

Testing of study participants who wore head-mounted display systems (Google glasses) found that the glasses created a partial peripheral vision obstruction, according to a study in the November 5 issue...

Combination treatment for metastatic melanoma results in longer overall survival

Among patients with metastatic melanoma, treatment with a combination of the drugs sargramostim plus ipilimumab, compared with ipilimumab alone, resulted in longer overall survival and lower toxicity, but no difference...

Hot flushes are going unrecognized, leaving women vulnerable

Hot flashes are one of the most distressing conditions faced by women who have been treated for breast cancer, but they are not being adequately addressed by healthcare professionals and...

Thirdhand smoke: Toxic airborne pollutants linger long after the smoke clears

Berkeley Lab researchers Lara Gundel and Hugo Destaillats found that thirdhand smoke continues to be harmful for hours after a cigarette has been extinguished.Ever walked into a hotel room and smelled old cigarette smoke? While the last smoker may have left the room hours or even days ago, the lingering odors -- resulting...

Cancer cell fingerprints in the blood may speed up childhood cancer diagnosis

Newly-identified cancer cell fingerprints in the blood could one day help doctors diagnose a range of children's cancers faster and more accurately, according to research presented at the National Cancer...

Why scratching makes you itch more

In the vicious cycle of itching and scratching, we scratch an itch to cause minor pain in the skin, and then the brain releases serotonin in response to that pain. However, in addition to tamping down pain, serotonin also reacts with receptors on neurons that carry itch signals to the brain, making itching worse.Turns out your mom was right: Scratching an itch only makes it worse. New research from scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that scratching causes...

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