Popular Science articles about Health & Medicine

Zombie outbreak? Statistical mechanics reveals the ideal hideout

A team of Cornell University researchers focusing on a fictional zombie outbreak as an approach to disease modeling suggests heading for the hills, in the Rockies, to save your brains from the undead.

The Lancet: Scientists report bionic hand reconstruction in 3 Austrian men

Three Austrian men have become the first in the world to undergo a new technique called "bionic reconstruction," enabling them to use a robotic prosthetic hand controlled by their mind,...

Study finds peanut consumption in infancy prevents peanut allergy

Introduction of peanut products into the diets of infants at high risk of developing peanut allergy was safe and led to an 81 percent reduction in the subsequent development of...

New target for prostate cancer treatment discovered by Keck Medicine of USC researchers

Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) scientists have found a promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer. The findings offer evidence that a newly discovered member of...

New HPV vaccine offers greater protection against cervical cancer than current vaccine

Scientists have developed a new HPV (human papilloma virus) vaccine which protects against nine types of the virus -- seven of which cause most cases of cervical cancer. The new...

Potential new breathalyzer for lung cancer screening

The fluorescent cross-responsive sensor array that consists of 35 chemically responsive spots and three through holes for zero point positioning.Researchers from Chongqing University in China have developed a high sensitive fluorescence-based sensor device that can rapidly identify cancer related volatile organic compounds -- biomarkers found exclusively in the exhaled...

Thames study: Rivers can be a source antibiotic resistance

Rivers and streams could be a major source of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

Tracking parasites with satellites

This is Professor Archie Clements, Director at the ANU Research School of Population Health.Scientists are teaming up to use satellite data to target deadly parasites to help predict patterns of parasitic diseases such as malaria, worms and hydatids.

Energy drinks significantly increase hyperactivity in schoolchildren

Middle-school children who consume heavily sweetened energy drinks are 66% more likely to be at risk for hyperactivity and inattention symptoms, a new study led by the Yale School of...

E-cigarette vapors, flavorings, trigger lung cell stress

Do electronic cigarettes help people quit smoking? As the debate continues on that point, a new University of Rochester study suggests that e-cigarettes are likely a toxic replacement for tobacco...

1 in 3 people would risk shorter life rather than take daily pill to avoid heart disease

One in three people say they would risk living a shorter life instead of taking a daily pill to prevent cardiovascular disease, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality...

Dr. Benoit Chassaing and Dr. Andrew T. Gewirtz, from left to right.

The numbers are in: As many as 2 in 3 smokers will die from their habit

Professor Emily Banks discusses 45 and Up Study findings.A large Australian study of more than 200,000 people has provided independent confirmation that up to two in every three smokers will die from their habit if they continue to...

Reducing energy efficiency boosts calorie burning in muscle

Scientists at the University of Iowa and the Iowa City VA Medical Center have developed a targeted approach that overrides muscles' intrinsic energy efficiency and allows muscle to burn more energy, even during low to moderate exercise. The image shows colorized infrared images of mice after performing low-intensity exercise on a treadmill. The mouse on the right of the image was treated with a targeted vivo-morpholino injection that suppresses the KATP channel. The mouse on the left is a control.What started as an evolutionary protection against starvation has become a biological "bad joke" for people who need to lose weight. The human body doesn't distinguish between dieting and possible...

People with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of key nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have lower levels of important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients, such as folate from food and vitamin E, than healthy people, according to a new...

Anticoagulant linked with lower risk of death following heart attack compared to heparin

Patients who experienced a certain type of heart attack who received the anticoagulant fondaparinux had a lower risk of major bleeding events and death both in the hospital and after...

Women active a few times weekly have lower risk of heart disease, stroke and blood clots

Middle-aged women who are physically active a few times per week have lower risks of heart disease, stroke and blood clots than inactive women, according to research in the American...

The Lancet: Short-term use of hormone replacement therapy associated with increased ovarian cancer risk

Taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for menopause, even for just a few years, is associated with a significantly increased risk of developing the two most common types of ovarian cancer,...

Historic US and UK dietary advice on fats 'should not have been introduced'

National dietary advice on fat consumption issued to millions of US and UK citizens in 1977 and 1983, to cut coronary heart disease incidence, lacked any solid trial evidence to...

What's next in diets: Chili peppers?

Spice up your diet with peppers every day to keep obesity away.Don't go chomping on a handful of chili peppers just yet, but there may be help for hopeful dieters in those fiery little Native American fruits.

Smartphone, finger prick, 15 minutes, diagnosis -- done!

Smartphone dongles performed a point-of-care HIV and syphilis test in Rwanda from finger prick whole blood in 15 minutes, operated by health care workers trained on a software app.A team of researchers, led by Samuel K. Sia, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering, has developed a low-cost smartphone accessory that can perform a point-of-care test that...

Bioengineered miniature structures could prevent heart failure

The delivery of tiny biodegradable microstructures to heart tissue damaged by heart attack may help repair the tissue and prevent future heart failure. A team led by cardiovascular researchers at...

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