Popular Science articles about Health & Medicine

Dr. Michael Buchert, Dr. Toby Phesse, associate professor Matthias Ernst (L-R) and colleagues found more than 80 percent of bowel cancers could be treated with existing medicines.

'Deadly diarrhea' rates nearly doubled in 10 years: Study

Infections with the intestinal superbug C. difficile nearly doubled from 2001 to 2010 in U.S. hospitals without noticeable improvement in patient mortality rates or hospital lengths of stay, according to...

Brief depression questionnaires could lead to unnecessary antidepressant prescriptions

Short questionnaires used to identify patients at risk for depression are linked with antidepressant medications being prescribed when they may not be needed, according to new research from UC Davis...

Afatinib improves progression-free survival in head and neck cancer

The tyrosine kinase inhibitor afatinib significantly improved progression-free survival compared to methotrexate in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after failure of platinum-based...

Modified vitamin D shows promise as treatment for pancreatic cancer

This image depicts from left to right, Professor Ronald Evans, Mira Sherman, Ruth Yu, Ann Atkins, Tiffany Tseng, and Michael Downes.A synthetic derivative of vitamin D was found by Salk Institute researchers to collapse the barrier of cells shielding pancreatic tumors, making this seemingly impenetrable cancer much more susceptible to...

A single statistic can strengthen public support for traffic safety laws

Public support for effective road safety laws, already solid, can be strengthened by a single number: a statistic that quantifies the traffic-related injury risks associated with a given law, according...

Researchers study vital 'on/off switches' that control when bacteria turn deadly

No matter how many times it's demonstrated, it's still hard to envision bacteria as social, communicating creatures.

In Joslin trial, Asian Americans lower insulin resistance on traditional diet

This is George King, M.D., Chief Scientific Officer at Joslin and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.Why are Asian Americans at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than Caucasian Americans, and prone to develop the disease at lower body weights? One part of this puzzle...

First blood test to diagnose depression in adults

The first blood test to diagnose major depression in adults has been developed by Northwestern Medicine® scientists, a breakthrough approach that provides the first objective, scientific diagnosis for depression. The...

Do wearable lifestyle activity monitors really work?

Wearable electronic activity monitors hold great promise in helping people to reach their fitness and health goals. These increasingly sophisticated devices help the wearers improve their wellness by constantly monitoring...

Improved survival shown in early-stage Hodgkin's Disease patients who receive radiation therapy

Patients with stage I and II Hodgkin's Disease who receive consolidated radiation therapy (RT) have a higher 10-year survival rate of 84 percent, compared to 76 percent for patients who...

Selectively rewiring the brain's circuitry to treat depression

On Star Trek, it is easy to take for granted the incredible ability of futuristic doctors to wave small devices over the heads of both humans and aliens, diagnose their problems through evaluating changes in brain activity or chemistry, and...

Cancer therapy: Driving cancer cells to suicide

Researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich report that a new class of chemical compounds makes cancer cells more sensitive to chemotherapeutic drugs. They have also pinpointed the relevant target enzyme,...

Promising results shown with targeted approaches in subsets of non-small cell lung cancer

The BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib has significant anti-tumour activity in patients with advanced BRAF V600E mutant non-small cell lung cancer whose disease has progressed after chemotherapy, according to phase II data...

UB study: COPD patients breathe easier with Lung Flute

Sethi has worked with Medical Acoustics to conduct multiple studies on using the Lung Flute to treat COPD.Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) report improved symptoms and health status when they use a hand-held respiratory device called the Lung Flute®, according to a new study by...

A way to kill chemo-resistant ovarian cancer cells: Cut down its protector

Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer, claiming the lives of more than 50% of women who are diagnosed with the disease. A study involving Ottawa and Taiwan researchers,...

Actions on climate change bring better health, study says

The number of extremely hot days in Eastern and Midwestern U.S. cities is projected to triple by mid-century, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and...

The 'Angelina Effect' was not only immediate, but also long-lasting

Referrals for genetic counselling and testing for breast cancer risk more than doubled across the UK after actress Angelina Jolie announced in May last year that she tested positive for...

Gut bacteria, artificial sweeteners and glucose intolerance

This image depicts gut microbiota.Artificial sweeteners -- promoted as aids to weight loss and diabetes prevention -- could actually hasten the development of glucose intolerance and metabolic disease, and they do so in a...

Phthalates heighten risk for childhood asthma

Researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health are the first to demonstrate an association between childhood asthma and prenatal exposure to...

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

Human herpesvirus 6, pictured above, is just one of numerous viruses found living in and on the bodies of healthy humans. The virus commonly causes illness in young children but is found in the mouths of some healthy young adults, where its presence indicates an active viral infection despite a lack of symptoms.The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research...

Penn Medicine bioethicists call for greater first-world response to Ebola outbreak

Amid recent discussion about the Ebola crisis in West Africa, Penn Medicine physicians say that high-income countries like the United States have an obligation to help those affected by the...

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