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This shows UTHealth researchers reporting on a superbug in Brazil are (from left to right) Barbara E. Murray, M.D.; Truc T. Tran, Pham.D; Jose M. Munita, M.D.; Diana Panesso, Ph.D; and Cesar Arias, M.D., Ph.D.

Re-emergence of Ebola focuses need for global surveillance strategies

EcoHealth Alliance, a nonprofit organization that focuses on conservation and global public health issues, published a comprehensive review today examining the current state of knowledge of the deadly Ebola and...

New technique detects microscopic diabetes-related eye damage

This is a retinal capillary with multiple loops. The blood cannot travel directly to nourish the retinal cells.Indiana University researchers have detected new early-warning signs of the potential loss of sight associated with diabetes. This discovery could have far-reaching implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic...

Hide and seek: Revealing camouflaged bacteria

GTPases (green) attack <i>Salmonella typhimurium</i> (red).A research team at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has discovered an protein family that plays a central role in the fight against the bacterial pathogen Salmonella within...

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First metritis vaccine protects dairy cows

Cornell scientists have created the first vaccines that can prevent metritis, one of the most common cattle diseases. The infection not only harms animals and farmers' profits, but also drives...

Breaking bad mitochondria

Mitochondria in hepatitis C-infected cells (bottom row) are self-destructing. The self-annihilation process explains the persistance and virulence of the virus in human liver cells.Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a mechanism that explains why people with the hepatitis C virus get liver disease and why the...

Penicillin redux: Rearming proven warriors for the 21st century

Conjugates of a beta-lactam antibiotic with the team's metallopolymer had enhanced antimicrobial properties compared with the antibiotic alone. The effect was particularly striking with hospital-associated MRSA (left).Penicillin, one of the scientific marvels of the 20th century, is currently losing a lot of battles it once won against bacterial infections. But scientists at the University of South...

Tamiflu & Relenza: How effective are they?

Tamiflu (the antiviral drug oseltamivir) shortens symptoms of influenza by half a day, but there is no good evidence to support claims that it reduces admissions to hospital or complications...

Laboratory-grown vaginas implanted in patients, scientists report

Scientists reported today the first human recipients of laboratory-grown vaginal organs. A research team led by Anthony Atala, M.D., director of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine,...

Breastfeeding and infant sleep

In a new article published online today in the journal Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health, Professor David Haig argues that infants that wake frequently at night to breastfeed are delaying...

Physical activity associated with lower rates of hospital readmission in patients with COPD

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who participated in any level of moderate to vigorous physical activity had a lower risk of hospital readmission within 30 days compared to...

Some immune cells defend only 1 organ

Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system may fight cancers and viral infections. The finding could aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness.

Study IDs new cause of brain bleeding immediately after stroke

By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers at UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the door to new...

More research called for into HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children

Researchers from LSTM have called for more research to be carried out into HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in children in sub-Saharan Africa. In a paper in The Lancet Infectious Diseases...

HIV+ women respond well to HPV vaccine

HIV-positive women respond well to a vaccine against the human papillomavirus (HPV), even when their immune system is struggling, according to newly published results of an international clinical trial. The...

Women who gain too much or too little weight during pregnancy at risk for having an overweight child

Gaining both too much or too little weight during pregnancy appears to increase the risk of having an overweight or obese child, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today...

Osteoporosis risk heightened among sleep apnea patients

A diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea may raise the risk of osteoporosis, particularly among women or older individuals, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of...

Hepatitis C treatment cures over 90 percent of patients with cirrhosis

Twelve weeks of an investigational oral therapy cured hepatitis C infection in more than 90 percent of patients with liver cirrhosis and was well tolerated by these patients, according to...

Common virus may cause anemia in patients with kidney disease

A virus that is present in most people in a latent state may induce or exacerbate anemia in patients with kidney disease, according to a study appearing in an upcoming...

New data reveals positive outcomes for hepatitis C transplant patients

New research announced at the International Liver CongressTM 2014 today provides new hope for the notoriously difficult-to-treat population of liver transplant patients with recurring hepatitis C (HCV).

Rabbits kept indoors could be vitamin D deficient

Regular exposure to artificial ultraviolet B light for two weeks doubled rabbits' serum vitamin D levels, the researchers found.Rabbits that remain indoors may suffer from a lack of vitamin D, researchers report in a new study. In rabbits kept as pets or used in laboratory studies, the deficiency...

3-D printing cancer cells to mimic tumors

A group of researchers in China and the US have successfully created a 3D model of a cancerous tumor using a 3D printer.

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