Popular Science articles about Health & Medicine

Viral therapy could boost limb-saving cancer treatment

Viruses designed to target and kill cancer cells could boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy to the arms and legs and help avoid amputation, a new study reports.

Anti-tank missile detector joins the fight against malaria

State-of-the-art military hardware could soon fight malaria, one of the most deadly diseases on the planet.

Transplanting gene into injured hearts creates biological pacemakers

Cardiologists at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have developed a minimally invasive gene transplant procedure that changes unspecialized heart cells into "biological pacemaker" cells that keep the heart steadily beating.

Researchers assess emergency radiology response after Boston Marathon bombings

An after-action review of the Brigham and Women's Hospital emergency radiology response to the Boston Marathon bombings highlights the crucial role medical imaging plays in emergency situations and ways in...

Moderate alcohol use associated with increased risk for atrial fibrillation

Even in moderation, consumption of wine and hard liquor may be a risk factor for atrial fibrillation, an abnormally fast heartbeat that can lead to stroke, heart failure and dementia,...

Miriam Hospital study examines smoking prevalence

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have found that people with mobility impairments under age 65 have significantly higher rates of smoking than those without mobility impairments. Additionally, smokers with mobility...

The Lancet: Extra dose of inactivated polio vaccine boosts immunity in children and could speed up global eradication efforts

Giving children under 5 years old an extra dose of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) helps to boost their immunity to the poliovirus and should be added to vaccination programmes in...

'Mississippi Baby' now has detectable HIV, researchers find

The child known as the "Mississippi baby" -- an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in The...

Scientist finds link between antibiotics, bacterial biofilms and chronic infections

The bacteria called non-typeable <i>Haemophilus influenzae</i> are a common cause of infection in the upper respiratory tract. By attaching to surfaces in the body the bacteria form a biofilm. Wu et al. have reported that when the bacteria encounter non-lethal amounts of specific antibiotics they are stimulated to form a bioiflm, a structure that causes chronic infection and which can be highly resistant to antibiotics.Researchers from the University of Southern California and the Oak Crest Institute of Science have discovered the link between antibiotics and bacterial biofilm formation leading to chronic lung, sinus and...

Depressed men with prostate cancer are diagnosed later stage, get less effective therapies

This is Dr. Jim Hu, University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences.Depressed men with localized prostate cancer were more likely to be diagnosed with more aggressive prostate cancer, received less effective treatments and survived for shorter times than prostate cancer patients...

NCI study finds extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years

Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a young age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according...

Researchers simplify process to purify water using seed extracts

Researchers have streamlined and simplified a process that uses extracts from seeds of Moringa oleifa trees to purify water, reducing levels of harmful bacteria by 90% to 99%. The hardy trees that are drought resistant are cultivated widely throughout many...

The Lancet: Causes of death shifting in people with HIV

HIV-positive adults in high income countries face a substantially reduced risk of death from AIDS-related causes, cardiovascular disease, and liver disease compared with a decade ago, according to a large...

Mutation stops worms from getting drunk

This is an image of a sober versus intoxicated worm, accompanied by a cartoon depicting the same states in a human.Neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin have generated mutant worms that do not get intoxicated by alcohol, a result that could lead to new drugs to treat the...

Weighty issue: Stress and high-fat meals combine to slow metabolism in women

Eating high fat comfort foods a day after being stressed out could lead to weight gain in women of up to 11 pounds a year, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.A new study in women suggests that experiencing one or more stressful events the day before eating a single high-fat meal can slow the body's metabolism, potentially contributing to weight...

Study of noninvasive retinal imaging device presented at Alzheimer's conference

A noninvasive optical imaging device developed at Cedars-Sinai can provide early detection of changes that later occur in the brain and are a classic sign of Alzheimer's disease, according to...

The Lancet: World's most advanced dengue vaccine candidate shows promise in phase 3 trial

The first dengue vaccine candidate (CYD-TDV) to reach phase 3 clinical testing has shown moderate protection (56%) against the disease in Asian children, according to new research published in The...

High stress, hostility, depression linked with increased stroke risk

Higher levels of stress, hostility and depressive symptoms are associated with significantly increased risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) in middle-age and older adults, according to new research...

New study shows drinking alcohol provides no heart health benefit

Reducing the amount of alcoholic beverages consumed, even for light-to-moderate drinkers, may improve cardiovascular health, including a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, lower body mass index (BMI) and blood...

Text message medicine: Texts from the ER can reduce binge drinking

Young adults who screened positive for a history of hazardous or binge drinking reduced their binge drinking by more than 50 percent after receiving mobile phone text messages following a...

New drug active against most aggressive type of lung cancer cells

Manchester scientists have shown that a new drug could prove useful in treating small cell lung cancer -- the most aggressive form of lung cancer.

Antibiotics after gall bladder surgery do not appear to reduce risk of infection

Among patients who underwent gall bladder removal for acute calculous cholecystitis, lack of postoperative antibiotic treatment did not result in a greater incidence of infections, according to a study in...

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