Popular Science articles about Health & Medicine

Actions on climate change bring better health, study says

The number of extremely hot days in Eastern and Midwestern U.S. cities is projected to triple by mid-century, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Researchers study vital 'on/off switches' that control when bacteria turn deadly

No matter how many times it's demonstrated, it's still hard to envision bacteria as social, communicating creatures.

In Joslin trial, Asian Americans lower insulin resistance on traditional diet

This is George King, M.D., Chief Scientific Officer at Joslin and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.Why are Asian Americans at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than Caucasian Americans, and prone to develop the disease at lower body weights? One part of this puzzle...

First blood test to diagnose depression in adults

The first blood test to diagnose major depression in adults has been developed by Northwestern MedicineĀ® scientists, a breakthrough approach that provides the first objective, scientific diagnosis for depression. The...

Do wearable lifestyle activity monitors really work?

Wearable electronic activity monitors hold great promise in helping people to reach their fitness and health goals. These increasingly sophisticated devices help the wearers improve their wellness by constantly monitoring...

Improved survival shown in early-stage Hodgkin's Disease patients who receive radiation therapy

Patients with stage I and II Hodgkin's Disease who receive consolidated radiation therapy (RT) have a higher 10-year survival rate of 84 percent, compared to 76 percent for patients who...

Scientists show that nicotine withdrawal reduces response to rewards across species

Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable death worldwide and is associated with approximately 440,000 deaths in the United States each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease...

Inflammation may be key to diabetes/heart disease link

Inflammation may be the reason high blood sugar levels damage blood vessels, raising the possibility that anti-inflammatory medications might someday be used to lower the risk of blood vessel disease...

Re-analysis of clinical trial data can change conclusions, say Stanford researchers

As many as one-third of previously published randomized clinical trials could be re-analyzed in ways that modify the conclusions of how many or what types of patients need to be...

New blood test could offer more tailored treatment of ovarian cancer

A new blood test allowing doctors to predict which ovarian cancer patients will respond to particular types of treatment is a step closer following a new study by Manchester scientists.

WHO-commissioned report on e-cigarettes misleading, say experts

World leading tobacco experts argue that a recently published World Health Organization (WHO)-commissioned review of evidence on e-cigarettes contains important errors, misinterpretations and misrepresentations, putting policy-makers and the public in...

Penn Medicine bioethicists call for greater first-world response to Ebola outbreak

Amid recent discussion about the Ebola crisis in West Africa, Penn Medicine physicians say that high-income countries like the United States have an obligation to help those affected by the outbreak and to advance research to fight the deadly disease...

The 'Angelina Effect' was not only immediate, but also long-lasting

Referrals for genetic counselling and testing for breast cancer risk more than doubled across the UK after actress Angelina Jolie announced in May last year that she tested positive for...

Gut bacteria, artificial sweeteners and glucose intolerance

This image depicts gut microbiota.Artificial sweeteners -- promoted as aids to weight loss and diabetes prevention -- could actually hasten the development of glucose intolerance and metabolic disease, and they do so in a...

Phthalates heighten risk for childhood asthma

Researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health are the first to demonstrate an association between childhood asthma and prenatal exposure to...

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

Human herpesvirus 6, pictured above, is just one of numerous viruses found living in and on the bodies of healthy humans. The virus commonly causes illness in young children but is found in the mouths of some healthy young adults, where its presence indicates an active viral infection despite a lack of symptoms.The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research...

Brain inflammation dramatically disrupts memory retrieval networks, UCI study finds

Brain inflammation can rapidly disrupt our ability to retrieve complex memories of similar but distinct experiences, according to UC Irvine neuroscientists Jennifer Czerniawski and John Guzowski.

How bacteria battle fluoride

Researchers have determined key structural differences that allow a subset of CLC transporters to preferentially select fluoride over chloride, which can help bacteria expel toxic fluoride. The binding site of a standard CLC transporter is shown here.He's not a dentist, but Christopher Miller is focused on fluoride. Two studies from his Brandeis University lab provide new insights into the mechanisms that allow bacteria to resist fluoride...

'Electronic skin' could improve early breast cancer detection

For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as MRI. But scientists are now developing an "electronic skin" that "feels" and images small lumps that...

Taking short walking breaks found to reverse negative effects of prolonged sitting

An Indiana University study has found that three easy -- one could even say slow -- 5-minute walks can reverse harm caused to leg arteries during three hours of prolonged...

Soy supplementation adversely effects expression of breast cancer-related genes

Soy supplementation alters expression of genes associated with breast cancer, raising concerns that soy could have adverse effects in breast cancer, according to a new study published September 4 in...

Potassium-rich foods cut stroke, death risks among older women

Postmenopausal women who eat foods higher in potassium are less likely to have strokes and die than women who eat less potassium-rich foods, according to new research in the American...

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