Popular Science articles about Health & Medicine

This image depicts from lef to right Dr Martha Clokie, Professor Andy Ellis and Professor Paul Monks from the University of Leicester with the mass spectrometer

Junk food makes rats lose appetite for balanced diet

A diet of junk food not only makes rats fat, but also reduces their appetite for novel foods, a preference that normally drives them to seek a balanced diet, reports...

Potential therapy for the Sudan strain of Ebola could help contain some future outbreaks

Ebola is a rare, but deadly disease that exists as five strains, none of which have approved therapies. One of the most lethal strains is the Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV). Although...

Fighting prostate cancer with a tomato-rich diet

Men who eat over 10 portions a week of tomatoes have an 18 per cent lower risk of developing prostate cancer, new research suggests.

Wii Balance Board induces changes in the brains of MS patients

This flowchart shows the study protocol.A balance board accessory for a popular video game console can help people with multiple sclerosis (MS) reduce their risk of accidental falls, according to new research published online in...

Study shows 25 percent fewer opioid-related deaths in states allowing medical marijuana

On average, states allowing the medical use of marijuana have lower rates of deaths resulting from opioid analgesic overdoses than states without such laws. Opioid analgesics, such as OxyContin, Percocet...

A prescription for better stroke care

'The good news is that Ontarians are receiving very good stroke care overall,' said Dr. Gustavo Saposnik, lead author of the study and director of the Stroke Research Unit of St. Michael's Hospital. 'But there are still things we can do to help patients receive better quality, long-term care after a stroke. And the first thing on that list is giving each patient a prescription before he or she leaves as part of discharge planning.'Stroke patients are 70 per cent more likely to continue taking their stroke prevention medications one year later if they have a prescription in hand when discharged -- according to...

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules

Anyone who has suffered an injury can probably remember the after-effects, including pain, swelling or redness. These are signs that the body is fighting back against the injury. When tissue...

Polio: Mutated virus breaches vaccine protection

Thanks to effective vaccination, polio is considered nearly eradicated. Each year only a few hundred people are stricken worldwide. However, scientists of the University of Bonn, together with colleagues from...

Treating pain by blocking the 'chili-pepper receptor'

As anyone who has bitten into a chili pepper knows, its burning spiciness -- though irresistible to some -- is intolerable to others. Scientists exploring the chili pepper's effect are...

Hospitalizations, deaths from heart disease, stroke drop in last decade

U.S. hospitalizations and deaths from heart disease and stroke dropped significantly in the last decade, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Factor in naked mole rat's cells enhances protein integrity

The naked mole rat, a long-lived rodent, is being studied for the secrets its biology can reveal about healthy aging.  Investigators at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found a factor in the rodent's cells that protects and alters function of the proteasome, a garbage disposer for damaged and obsolete proteins.Scientists at the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, part of the School of Medicine at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, have found another secret of...

From nose to knee: Engineered cartilage regenerates joints

This figure shows an MRI of a defect tissue site before (left) and four months after (right) transplantation.Human articular cartilage defects can be treated with nasal septum cells. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel report that cells taken from the nasal septum are...

Leading scientists call for a stop to non-essential use of fluorochemicals

Fluorochemicals are synthetically produced chemicals, which repel water and oil and are persistent towards aggressive physical and chemical conditions in industrial processing. These characteristics have made the fluorochemicals useful in...

Poll finds many in US lack knowledge about Ebola and its transmission

Although the Centers for Disease and Prevention (CDC) reports no known cases of Ebola transmission in the United States, a Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH)/SSRS poll released shows that...

Eye implant developed at Stanford could lead to better glaucoma treatments

For the 2.2 million Americans battling glaucoma, the main course of action for staving off blindness involves weekly visits to eye specialists who monitor -- and control -- increasing pressure...

Black carbon -- a major climate pollutant -- also linked to cardiovascular health

Black carbon pollutants from wood smoke are known to trap heat near the earth’s surface and warm the climate. A new study led by McGill Professor Jill Baumgartner suggests that...

American Heart Association issues e-cigarette recommendations

The American Heart Association issued new policy recommendations today on the use of e-cigarettes and their impact on tobacco-control efforts. The guidance was published in the association's journal, Circulation.

Insulin offers new hope for the treatment of acute pancreatitis

This is Dr. Jason Bruce from The University of Manchester.Acute pancreatitis involves the pancreas digesting itself resulting in severe abdominal pain, vomiting and systemic inflammation. Every year in the UK around 20,000 patients are diagnosed with the disease resulting...

Experts denounce clinical trials of unscientific, 'alternative' medicines

Experts writing in the Cell Press journal Trends in Molecular Medicine on August 20th call for an end to clinical trials of "highly implausible treatments" such as homeopathy and reiki....

Diabetes calculator helps identify A&E patients at risk of disease

A new online tool will help doctors predict which patients are most likely to develop diabetes.

Injected bacteria shrink tumors in rats, dogs and humans

This is a gram stain of <I>C. novyi</I>-NT germination in a dog tumor. The darker rod-shaped bacteria are visible throughout the image.A modified version of the Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) bacterium can produce a strong and precisely targeted anti-tumor response in rats, dogs and now humans, according to a new report...

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