Latest popular science news from other websites

A scourge of rural Africa, the tsetse fly is genetically deciphered

This is an image of tsetse fly. An international team of researchers led by the Yale School of Public Health has successfully sequenced the genetic code of the tsetse fly,...

Cosmic illusion revealed: Gravitational lens magnifies supernova

Astronomers have announced the discovery of a galaxy that magnified a background, Type Ia supernova thirty-fold through gravitational lensing. This first example of strong gravitational lensing of a supernova confirms...

Fossil Unearthed in China Sheds Light on Origin of Flying Reptiles

A Chinese fossil is the earliest and most primitive pterodactyloid, part of a group of flying reptiles that ruled the skies some 163 million years ago, scientists report.

New genetic brain disorder in humans discovered

A newly identified genetic disorder associated with degeneration of the central and peripheral nervous systems in humans, along with the genetic cause, has been reported by researchers. By performing DNA...

Carbon loss from soil accelerating climate change

New research has found that increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere cause soil microbes to produce more carbon dioxide, accelerating climate change. This research challenges our previous understanding...

Genomic diversity and admixture differs for stone-age Scandinavian foragers and farmers

Scientists report a breakthrough on understanding the demographic history of Stone-Age humans. A genomic analysis of eleven Stone-Age human remains from Scandinavia revealed that expanding Stone-age farmers assimilated local hunter-gatherers,...

Some corals adjusting to rising ocean temperatures

Scientists have revealed how some corals can quickly switch on or off certain genes in order to survive in warmer-than-average tidal waters. To most people, 86-degree Fahrenheit water is pleasant...

Top 12 ways the world can eliminate agriculture's climate footprint

Annual carbon emissions from global agriculture can be reduced by as much as 50 to 90 percent by 2030—the equivalent of removing all the cars in the world—according to a...

Lab-grown skin might replace animal testing

They’ve done it before, but this type of lab-grown skin may replace animals in cosmetic and drug testing.

Scientists build new 'off switch' to shut down neural activity

Nearly a decade ago, the era of optogenetics was ushered in with the development of channelrhodopsins, light-activated ion channels that can, with the flick of a switch, instantaneously turn on...

Autism Genome Project delivers genetic discovery

A new study from investigators with the Autism Genome Project, the world's largest research project on identifying genes associated with risk for autism, has found that the comprehensive use...

Couples need just one conversation to decide not to have children

Many couples agree not to have children after only one discussion, and sometimes none at all, the British Sociological Association's annual conference in Leeds heard today.

Genetic legacy of rare dwarf trees is widespread

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have found genetic evidence that one of Britain's native tree species, the dwarf birch found in the Scottish Highlands, was once common in...

U.S. Puzzles Over What to Do about E-Cigarettes

Federal regulators propose new rules to answer long-burning questions about e-cig -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

'Double-duty' electrolyte enables new chemistry for longer-lived batteries

Researchers have developed a new and unconventional battery chemistry aimed at producing batteries that last longer than previously thought possible. Researchers have challenged a long-held assumption that a battery's three...

Blood cells reprogrammed into blood stem cells in mice

Researchers have reprogrammed mature blood cells from mice into blood-forming hematopoietic stem cells, using a cocktail of eight genetic switches called transcription factors. The reprogrammed cells are able to self-renew...

You may have billions and billions of good reasons for being unfit

Although our chromosomes are relatively stable within our lifetimes, the genetic material found in our mitochondria is highly variable across individuals and may impact upon human health, say researchers. Genomes...

The Ancient Maya And Virtual Worlds: Different Perspectives On Material Meanings

If Facebook were around 1,400 years ago, the ancient Maya might have been big fans of the virtual self. The Maya believed that part of your identity could inhabit material objects,...

When things get glassy, molecules go fractal

School children learn the difference between liquids and gases, but centuries of scholarship have failed to produce consensus about how to categorize glass. Now, combining theory and numerical simulations, researchers...

Your T-shirt's ringing: Printable tiny flexible cell phones for clothes?

A new version of 'spaser' technology being investigated could mean that mobile phones become so small, efficient, and flexible they could be printed on clothing. A spaser is effectively a...

New shape discovered using rubber bands

While setting out to fabricate new springs to support a cephalopod-inspired imaging project, a group of researchers stumbled upon a surprising discovery: the hemihelix, a shape rarely seen in nature....

Study Links California Drought to Global Warming

While researchers have sometimes connected weather extremes to man-made global warming, usually it's not done in real time.

Astronomers Solve Mystery of Superbright Supernova

Astronomers have struggled to explain why a distant supernova was way too bright. Now, one team has figured it out.

Two new river turtle species described

The alligator snapping turtle is the largest river turtle in North America, weighing in at up to 200 pounds and living almost a century. Now researchers have discovered that it...

Measles cases hit record levels in U.S.; vaccinations encouraged

Measles cases are at their highest level in the U.S. for this point in the year since 1996, so public health officials are urging parents to vaccinate children and are...

New type of protein action found to regulate development

Researchers report they have figured out how the aptly named protein Botch blocks the signaling protein called Notch, which helps regulate development. In a report on the discovery, the scientists...

New point of attack on HIV for vaccine development

A new vulnerable site on the HIV virus has been found, which may lead researchers closer to developing a vaccine for the illness. "HIV has very few known sites of...

Cell resiliency surprises scientists

Cells are more resilient in taking care of their DNA than scientists originally thought, new research shows. Even when missing critical components, cells can adapt and make copies of their...

Hydrothermal vents: How productive are the ore factories in the deep sea?

Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea, the so-called 'black smokers,' are fascinating geological formations. They are home to unique ecosystems, but are also potential suppliers of raw materials for the...

Using antineutrinos to monitor nuclear reactors

When monitoring nuclear reactors, the International Atomic Energy Agency has to rely on input given by the operators. In the future, antineutrino detectors may provide an additional option for monitoring....

Youth Baseball: Take The Bat, Leave The Candy At Home

Nothing is more antithetical to baseball culture than apple slices and kale chips - fans want crackerjack and beer and hot dogs. For events, that's okay, but it is also a...

Paying Closer Attention To Attention

Ellen's (not her real name) adoptive parents weren't surprised when the school counselor suggested that she might have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Several professionals had made this suggestion...

Three-Banded Panther Worm Debuts as a New Model in the Study of Regeneration

The lab of Whitehead Institute Member Peter Reddien is introducing the scientific community to the three-banded panther worm (Hofstenia miamia), a small organism with the ability to regenerate any missing...

To Mark Territory or Not to Mark Territory: Breaking the Pheromone Code

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has deciphered the surprisingly versatile code by which chemical cues help trigger some of the most basic behaviors in mice.

Active Guatemala Volcanoes Seen From Above (Photo)

Four active volcanoes in Guatemala are seen from a NASA aerial science mission. The mission aimed to measure ground deformation around the volcanoes, which can give advance warning before eruptions.

Controlling Brain Waves To Improve Vision

Have you ever accidently missed a red light or a stop sign? Or have you heard someone mention a visible event that you passed by but totally missed seeing? "When we...

The blood preserved in the preserved relic pumpkin did not belong to Louis XVI

The results of an international study indicate that the DNA recovered from the inside of a pumpkin, attributed so far to the French King Louis XVI, does not actually belong...

Blood in Gourd Didn't Belong to Louis XVI, New DNA Study Finds

New genetic evidence casts further doubt on the authenticity of a grisly French relic: a gourd long believed to be stained with the blood of Louis XVI.

Two Adorable Baby Gorillas Born at Bronx Zoo

Two baby western lowland gorillas have been born at the Wildlife Conservation Society's Bronx Zoo, in New York. A 33-year old gorilla named Julia gave birth on March 10 and...

It's a bubble, but not as we know it

Multi-sensory technology that creates soap bubbles, which can have images projected onto them or when the bubbles are burst release a scent, is being unveiled at an international conference. The...

Bake your own droplet lens: Cheap, high-quality lenses made from droplets of transparent silicone

Researchers have created a new type of lens that costs less than a penny to make, and can be used in a 3-D printed attachment that turns a Smartphone into...

Protecting Olive Oil From Counterfeiters

Just a few grams of the new substance are enough to tag the entire olive oil production of Italy. If counterfeiting were suspected, the particles added at the place of...

Computer program could help solve arson cases

Sifting through the chemical clues left behind by arson is delicate, time-consuming work, but University of Alberta researchers teaming with RCMP scientists in Canada, have found a way to speed...

Reprieve for men: Y chromosome is not vanishing

The sex chromosome has been shrinking throughout mammalian evolution, but many of its remaining genes play crucial roles beyond sex determination.Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2014.15103

Fixing computers in space requires more than IT

Two American astronauts hustled in a planned spacewalk to fix a faulty external computer aboard the International Space Station

New U.S. internet rules would let companies pay for priority

U.S. regulators are expected to vote on May 15 on a new set of so-called "net neutrality" rules that will allow internet providers to negotiate deals with content providers to...

Facebook woos journalists with 'FB Newswire'

Facebook launched Thursday FB Newswire, billed as an online trove of real-time information for journalists and newsrooms to mine while reporting on events or crafting stories.

Yurok Tribe to release condors in California

The Yurok Tribe has signed agreements with state and federal agencies that will lead to the first release of captive-bred condors into Northern California's Redwood Coast.

Netflix joining line-up of three US cable-TV services

Netflix's Internet video service is about to join the programming line-up of three small cable-TV providers in the U.S.

Why Captain America’s Shield Is Basically a Star-Spangled Supercapacitor (Op-Ed)

How does Captain America's shield manage to absorb the energy of bullets?

Fruitfly study identifies brain circuit that drives daily cycles of rest, activity

Researchers describe a circuit in the brain of fruit flies that controls their daily, rhythmic behavior of rest and activity. They also found that the fly version of the human...

Oxygen diminishes heart's ability to regenerate, researchers discover

Scientific research previously discovered that the newborn animal heart can heal itself completely, whereas the adult heart lacks this ability. New research by the same team today has revealed why...

NASA Hubble Exhibit at National Air and Space Museum

Two instruments that played critical roles in NASA's Hubble Space Telescope discoveries now are on display at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington.

Pilot study suggests ways to widen access to fecal transplants for C. diff infections

Using frozen stool from healthy, unrelated donors was safe and effective in treating patients with serious, relapsing diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile, according to a new pilot study published in...

On-hold hell: why automated phone systems are infuriating

Anyone whos used an automated phone service rarely has anything good to say about it. It turns out, there are many interesting scientific reasons for this Continue reading...

Ginseng Could Be An Effective Way to Prevent the Flu (Op-Ed)

Although it has been used by humans for thousands of years, more recent research has begun to investigate therapeutic and pharmacological uses including anti-allergy and anti-inflammatory properties.

Food Additives 'Generally Recognized As Safe" Could Be Anything But (Op-Ed)

Chemical additives in food are a poorly regulated health risk in the U.S. food supply, says NRDC executive director Peter Lehner.

Greased lightning: the nanotechnology in engine oil

Nanotech additives act like minuscule ball bearings to lubricate moving metal surfaces that come into contact inside engines, improving fuel efficiency and reducing wear and tear Continue reading...

Life on Us: A Close-Up Look at the Bugs That Call Us Home (Op-Ed)

Many microscopic bugs and bacteria live on our skin and within our various nooks and crannies. Almost anywhere on (or even within) the human body can be home to these...

PhDs in Focus: South Africa’s pan-African academic appeal

South Africa attracts academics from across Africa. In this podcast, a Ghanaian postdoc explains why.

Untangling Brazil's controversial new forest code

Approved in 2012, Brazil's new Forest Code has few admirers. Agricultural interests argue that it threatens the livelihoods of farmers. Environmentalists counter that it imperils millions of hectares of forest,...

Centenarian blood provides could help find ‘fountain of youth’

Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper died at the ripe age of 115, but she did something for us all – she bequeathed her body to science.

UK science to get £200m polar ship

UK scientists are to get a £200m icebreaker, which will be one of the biggest, most capable polar research vessels in the world.

Walking May Spark Creative Thinking

From artists to office workers, people in all walks of life claim that going for a stroll helps them work out ideas or overcome creative blocks, and now new research...

Engineered E. coli produces high levels of D-ribose

D-ribose is a commercially important sugar used as a sweetener, a nutritional supplement, and as a starting compound for synthesizing riboflavin and several antiviral drugs. Genetic engineering of Escherichia coli...

Improve the Food, Not Just the Food Label (Op-Ed)

A recent proposal aims to change the information we see on food labels. But what's really needed is an improvement to the quality of the food, not just the food...

Finished your bottle of water? Now eat it!

An edible bottle of water could rid our world of excess plastic waste.

Surprising New Insights Into PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene

Ever since it was first identified more than 15 years ago, the PTEN gene has been known to play a key role in preventing the onset and progression of numerous...

Researchers Pinpoint Protein Crucial for Development of Biological Rhythms in Mice

Johns Hopkins researchers report that they have identified a protein essential to the formation of the tiny brain region in mice that coordinates sleep-wake cycles and other so-called circadian rhythms.

'Tis the season: Be on the lookout for brown recluse spiders

Warmer, spring weather has many of us getting out and becoming more active, and the brown recluse spider is no exception. Scientists shared 10 facts about the somewhat small, shy...

Take notes by hand for better long-term comprehension

Dust off those Bic ballpoints and college-ruled notebooks: research shows that taking notes by hand is better than taking notes on a laptop for remembering conceptual information over the long...

Sonar imaging finds 19th century shipwreck in San Francisco Bay

More than 100 shipwrecks lay beneath the rushing surf of San Francisco Bay, where the Golden Gate Bridge meets the Pacific Ocean. KPIX's Andria Borba reports sonar surveying has given...

Boring cells could hold the key to heart disease

Fibroblasts, cells long thought to be boring and irrelevant, could offer an alternative to heart transplants for patients with heart disease. "Heart disease is still one of the major killers...

Palliation is rarely a topic in studies on advanced cancer

Randomized controlled trials only rarely consider end-of-life aspects and often fail to name superordinate patient-relevant treatment goals. Instead of quality of life, survival is in the foreground, research shows.

Motor skill deficiencies linked to autism severity, reseearch says

A relationship between motor skill deficiencies and the severity of the symptoms of autism spectrum disorder has been found in very young children. The findings indicate that development of motor...

How do liquid foams completely block sound?

Liquid foams have a remarkable property: they completely block the transmission of sound over a wide range of frequencies. Physicists have studied how sound is attenuated in liquid foams. Their...

Microbes provide insights into evolution of human language

Research into Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a type of bacteria common in water and soil, shows that they can communicate in a way that was previously thought to be unique to humans...

FEATURE: The most dangerous vaccination myths

When it comes to vaccinations, misinformation can be deadly. Here's what you really need to know about autism links and mercury fears.

Zombie-ant parasitic fungus castrated by hyperparasitic fungus

Ant colonies are protected against brain-manipulating parasitic fungi by another fungus Continue reading...

Powerful X-Flare Erupts On Sun's Western Limb | Video

An X1-class flare was recorded in multiple wavelengths by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory on April 24th, 2014 EDT (April 25th at 0032 UT).

Asteroids made easy: 'Patch of asteroid' being built inside a satellite

A dozen astronauts have walked on the moon, and several rovers have been piloted on Mars, giving us a good understanding of these off-world environments. But when it comes to...

Oil firm accused of hazardous South L.A. emissions agrees to upgrades

The agreement settles a probe by the EPA, launched after residents of the South L.A. neighborhood complained of health problems.An oil operation that sent noxious fumes into a South Los...

Odds of NYC Flooding During a Storm Up 20-Fold

New study documents rising storm surges since the mid-19th century.

Well: Aspirin Benefits Some at Risk for Colon Cancer

Many studies have found that regular aspirin use reduces the risk for colon cancer. Now scientists have found that aspirin may benefit some people far more than others.

Condensed Matter Physics Pitches In To Help Quantum Gravity

Relativity says that spacetime is smooth, and only big things can warp it, in ways that are exactly known. Quantum theory says that the smallest parts of the universe are...

The New Old Age Blog: The Documents You Need, When You Need Them

The American Bar Association has developed a smartphone app intended to make health care directives quickly and easily accessible.

Living With Cancer: Practicing Loss

People with cancer experience varying types of loss — of their health, of body parts, of freedom. Is there a way to practice for the losses that really matter? Susan...

Doctor and Patient: Are Med School Grads Prepared to Practice Medicine?

Each July at teaching hospitals across the country, freshly minted M.D.s take their place as interns at the bottom of the ladder. Are they ready to practice medicine?

Manitoba to crack down on misleading TV, phone and internet service promotions

The Manitoba government wants to crack down on misleading and confusing promotions for wireless, TV and internet service by forcing providers to be clear about how much their offers really...

'Godzilla' the Hockey Goalie? Rare Mineral Specimen Up for Sale

Common minerals came together in a bubble of a lava flow to form a one-of-a-kind specimen, dubbed 'Godzilla as a Hockey Goalie.' This and other mineral specimens go up for...

Moon Glows with Earthshine Over Italian Citadel (Photos)

Night sky photographer Giuseppe Petricca of Pisa, Italy, took these gorgeous images on March 3 of the crescent moon illuminated with earthshine over an Italian citadel. See how he did...

Ancient flying reptile from China fills evolutionary gap

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - It was the start of something big - really big.

Utah sperm swap 'unacceptable' but still unexplained -university docs

(Reuters) - A University of Utah committee investigating reports that a Salt Lake City fertility clinic worker artificially inseminated a patient with his own sperm called the action "unacceptable" on...

Asteroids as Seen From Mars; A Curiosity Rover First

A new image from NASA's Curiosity Mars rover is the first ever from the surface of Mars to show an asteroid, and it shows two: Ceres and Vesta.

Bitcoins in Space: Private Deep-Space Venture Aims to Launch 'BitSats'

Bitcoins soon may go off the grid and into space. One private venture is aiming to launch a cluster of tiny satellites that would broadcast the latest bitcoin transactions from...

Can Iconic 'Earthrise' Photo Help Protect Earth from Asteroid Impacts?

The NASA astronaut who snapped the 20th century's most famous photograph of Earth from space hopes the image can continue helping to protect the planet — not just from the...

Why does breast cancer often spread to the lung? Experts explain

New research shows why breast cancer often spreads or metastasizes to the lung. The breast cancer stem cell (CSC) has been shown to be responsible for metastasis in animal models,...

Raw Milk Is Not A Libertarian Issue - And Republicans Should Not Make It A GOP One

In American politics there is a comfortable détente about which science craziness to allow under the big tents - Republicans are okay if their members won't accept evidence of climate...

Critical vulnerabilities in TLS implementation for Java

In January and April 2014, Oracle has released critical Java software security updates. They resolve vulnerabilities that affected the "Java Secure Socket Extension" (JSSE), a software library implementing the "Transport...

Preserving endangered Middle East cultures, including early Christian

The cultural heritage of Syriac, an important language in the spread of early Christianity in the Middle East, is being preserved through the international collaboration.