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Alien Planet Kepler-186f: Complete Coverage of 'Earth Cousin' Discovery

On Thursday (April 17), NASA announced the historic discovery of Kepler-186f, an Earth-size alien planet 490 light-years from our own world that is located inside the habitable zone of its...

NASA's Moon-Orbiting LADEE Probe Crashes Down as Planned

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — NASA's robotic moon explorer, LADEE, is no more.Flight controllers confirmed that the orbiting spacecraft crashed into the back side of the moon Friday as planned, avoiding...

Photographer of Sherpas: Everest Avalanche "Will Be Spoken of for Generations"

Nat Geo photographer Aaron Huey documents Sherpa villages and shares perspective on the April 18 Everest avalanche.

28 Percent Of Morning After Pills In Study Are Counterfeit

Emergency contraceptive pills haven't reduced teen pregnancies or abortions but at least in America those incidents have not risen - in South America, unprotected sex is really taking a pregnancy...

Sun Emits A Mid-level Solar Flare

The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 9:03 a.m. EDT on April 18, 2014, and NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the event. Solar flares are powerful...

Magnitude-7.2 earthquake shakes Mexican capital

A powerful magnitude-7.2 earthquake shook central and southern Mexico on Friday, sending panicked people into the streets. Some walls cracked and fell, but there were no reports of major damage...

Malaria pathogen's cellular skeleton under super-microscope

The tropical disease malaria is caused by the Plasmodium parasite. For its survival and propagation, Plasmodium requires a protein called actin. Scientists used high-resolution structural biology methods to investigate the...

Plants With Dormant Seeds Give Rise To More Species

Durham, NC — Seeds that sprout as soon as they're planted may be good news for a garden. But wild plants need to be more careful. In the wild, a...

U.S. Delays Decision on Keystone XL Pipeline

The State Department will wait to decide whether to allow construction of the pipeline until it has a clearer idea how legal challenges to the route through Nebraska will be...

Gene variant increases risk of colorectal cancer from eating processed meat

A common genetic variant that affects one in three people appears to significantly increase the risk of colorectal cancer from the consumption of processed meat, according to a new study.

'Dressed' laser aimed at clouds may be key to inducing rain, lightning

The adage "Everyone complains about the weather but nobody does anything about it," may one day be obsolete if researchers at the University of Central Florida's College of Optics &...

Stanford researchers rethink 'natural' habitat for wildlife

Protecting wildlife while feeding a world population predicted to reach 9 billion by 2050 will require a holistic approach to conservation that considers human-altered landscapes such as farmland, according to...

Physicists design quantum switches which can be activated by single photons

Harvard researchers have succeeded in creating quantum switches that can be turned on and off using a single photon, a technological achievement that could pave the way for the creation...

Religious Music Brings Benefit to Seniors’ Mental Health

A new article published online in The Gerontologist reports that among older […]

Researchers question published no-till soil organic carbon sequestration rates

For the past 20 years, researchers have published soil organic carbon sequestration rates. Many of the research findings have suggested that soil organic carbon can be sequestered by simply switching...

Impact of childhood bullying still evident after 40 years

The negative social, physical and mental health effects of childhood bullying are still evident nearly 40 years later, according to new research. The study is the first to look at...

Ancient DNA Offers Clues To How Barnyard Chickens Came To Be

Durham, NC — Ancient DNA adds a twist to the story of how barnyard chickens came to be, finds a study to be published April 21 in the journal Proceedings...

New Study Suggests A Better Way To Deal With Bad Memories

What's one of your worst memories? How did it make you feel? According to psychologists, remembering the emotions felt during a negative personal experience, such as how sad you were...

MRI, on a molecular scale: Team develops system that could peer into atomic structure of individual molecules

For decades, scientists have used techniques such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging to gain invaluable insight into the atomic structure of molecules. Such efforts have long...

Quest for extraterrestrial life not over, experts say

The discovery of an Earth-sized planet in the "habitable" zone of a distant star, though exciting, is still a long way from pointing to the existence of extraterrestrial life, experts...

New, more versatile version of Geckskin: Gecko-like adhesives now useful for real world surfaces

(Phys.org) —The ability to stick objects to a wide range of surfaces such as drywall, wood, metal and glass with a single adhesive has been the elusive goal of many...

Gargantuan Iceberg – 8X Manhattan-Size – Has Left Glacier | Time-Lapse Video

“Ice island B31” is 200 feet thick and 21mi X 12mi. It separated from the Antarctic Pine Island Glacier in Nov. 2013. NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites have been imaging...

Changing Earth: 7 Ideas to Geoengineer Our Planet

Take a look at ratings for seven wild geoengineering ideas that could change the Earth's climate for better or for worse.

Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years

(Phys.org) —Bits of plant life encapsulated in molten glass by asteroid and comet impacts millions of years ago give geologists information about climate and life forms on the ancient Earth....

Under some LED bulbs whites aren't 'whiter than white'

For years, companies have been adding whiteners to laundry detergent, paints, plastics, paper and fabrics to make whites look "whiter than white," but now, with a switch away from incandescent...

Over Meal Of Whale Meat, Japan Announces Plan To Restart "Scientific" Whaling In Antarctica

Harpooned whale A whale captured by the Yushin Maru, a Japanese harpoon vessel, in February 2008. Customs and Border Protection Service, Commonwealth of Australia On March 31, Japan was ordered to halt its whaling...

Chronic inflammation linked to ‘high-grade’ prostate cancer

Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate […]

'Exotic' material is like a switch when super thin

(Phys.org) —Ever-shrinking electronic devices could get down to atomic dimensions with the help of transition metal oxides, a class of materials that seems to have it all: superconductivity, magnetoresistance and...

Useful mobile apps for saving energy and money

Tools for conservation can be found in the palm of your hands. We've rounded up some cool apps for going green

Our brains are hardwired for language

People blog, they don't lbog, and they schmooze, not mshooze. But why is this? Why are human languages so constrained? Can such restrictions unveil the basis of the uniquely human...

Mars orbiter snaps photo of Curiosity rover, possible drilling target

As Curiosity rover nears the end of its second year on the Red Planet, NASA is trying to decide what it should do next

California students feel UC admission squeeze

Most campuses take a lesser number of state students even as more get in from elsewhere.California high school seniors faced a tougher time winning a freshman spot at most of...

Church of Facebook? Cyberspace Inspires New Visions of Heaven

Is heaven for real? And if so, which heaven? For some, heaven is the Christian kind of afterlife that was described by a 4-year-old boy in the book and movie...

Innovative strategy to facilitate organ repair

A significant breakthrough could revolutionize surgical practice and regenerative medicine. A team led by Ludwik Leibler from the Laboratoire Matière Molle et Chimie (CNRS/ESPCI Paris Tech) and Didier Letourneur from...

Impurity size affects performance of emerging superconductive material

Research from North Carolina State University finds that impurities can hurt performance – or possibly provide benefits – in a key superconductive material that is expected to find use in...

SpaceX Claims Milestone With Bold Reusable Rocket Test

SpaceX's audacious plan to land part of a rocket in the ocean after launching it to space may not have gone perfectly, but the private spaceflight company's founder still considers...

Despite strong "Titanfall" sales, PS4 outsells Xbox One

An exclusive blockbuster game may not be enough for Microsoft to pull ahead of its competitor Sony

Genetic study tackles mystery of slow plant domestications

(Phys.org) —"The Modern View of Domestication," a special feature of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) published April 29, raises a number of startling questions about a...

World Briefing | Africa: Congo: Park Director Survives Shooting

Emmanuel de Merode, an internationally recognized Belgian conservationist who has been working to protect rare mountain gorillas in the Democratic Republic of Congo, was attacked Tuesday by unknown assailants.

Bright points in sun's atmosphere mark patterns deep in its interior

Like a balloon bobbing along in the air while tied to a child's hand, a tracer has been found in the sun's atmosphere to help track the flow of material...

Sherpas Take Steep Risks for Life-Changing Pay

Sherpas see climbing dangerous peaks as a path to prosperity.

The people’s toll

Though their sound is quite clear, the origin of the Lowell House bells is quite convoluted. Charles U. Lowe ’42 extensively researched the Lowell House bells’ history here, but the...

Insulating sheath on nerve cells isn't an even coat

Myelin doesn't evenly coat axons, a finding that runs counter to what scientists suspected.

Space-tested fluid flow concept advances infectious disease diagnoses

A new medical-testing device is being prepped to enter the battle against infectious disease. This instrument could improve diagnosis of certain diseases in remote areas, thanks in part to knowledge...

Going nuts? Turkey looks to pistachios to heat new eco-city

Pistachios are already a key ingredient in Turkish baklava, but the country may now have found a new way to exploit the nuts known as "green gold"—by using their shells...

APNewsBreak: Medicaid paid $12M for Illinois dead

CHICAGO (AP) -- An internal state government memo says auditors have found the Illinois Medicaid program has paid an estimated $12 million for medical services for...

Holistic Conservation: Forget 20th Century Claims About People And Species Extinction

The USA alone has more wilderness than the entire continent of Africa does, but the natural world is not the same as it was 20, 50 or 100 years ago.  And the...

Shor’s code-breaking algorithm inspired reflections on quantum information

Twenty years ago, physicists met in Santa Fe to explore the ramifications of quantum information.

5 Unanswered Questions About Jesus

As Christians worldwide gather for Easter to celebrate their belief in the death and rebirth of Jesus, researchers continue to delve into the mysteries that surround the man.

Huge Antarctic Iceberg Drifts Out to Sea (Time-Lapse Video)

A massive chunk of ice broke loose and is now drifting away from Antarctica.

Ancient Puppy Paw Prints Found on Roman Tiles

The paw prints and hoof prints of a few meddlesome animals have been preserved for posterity on ancient Roman tiles recently discovered by archaeologists in England.

Birthplace of the domesticated chili pepper identified in Mexico

Central-east Mexico gave birth to the domesticated chili pepper—now the world's most widely grown spice crop—reports an international team of researchers, led by a plant scientist at the University of...

An Invisible Barn And Other Amazing Images From This Week

Invisible Barn What do you get when you wrap a barn in mylar? You get nothing. ...

Katherine Tallmadge: Responding to Rush Limbaugh Attacks on Obesity (Op-Ed)

Why is nutritionist Katherine Tallmadge being attacked by conservatives?

5 Pot Facts for 4/20

For the international day of celebrating all things weed, April 20, here are some quick facts about this controversial, mind-altering plant.

Pot of Gold: Innovation Helps Cannabis Industry Flourish

A former NASA scientist hired to consult on marijuana growing light technologies is just one example of the innovation spurred by the legalization of the drug in Colorado.

Russia Ships The World's First Load of Offshore Arctic Oil

Oil Be There The Prirazlomnoye offshore drilling platform, in the Pechora Sea above the Arctic circle, began extracting oil in December 2013, and loaded its first shipment in April 2014 -- about a...

Patented research remotely detects nitrogen-rich explosives

A patented technique that improves military security and remotely detects improvised explosive devices has been developed by an engineer. The same technique could help police during drug searches. The majority...

A Q&A forum with the president

Harvard President Drew Faust addressed an open meeting Wednesday hosted by the Harvard Undergraduate Council (UC), saying that the twin concerns of sexual assault policies and campus inclusion “have forced us and urged...

Disabled Pets Get 'Bionic' - PBS Show Trailer

PBS's show Nature is featuring animals who have been treated with latest state-of-the-art prosthetics. It premiered April 9th, 2014.

How the Bluefin-21 Searches For Flight 370 Wreckage on the Ocean Floor (Infographic)

Unmanned submersible uses sonar to scan the ocean floor and return a 3D map to the surface.

'Carnivorous Ballet' Helps Cheetahs Coexist With Lions

But wild dogs in Africa's Serengeti suffer when lions surge

Is Global Warming a Giant Natural Fluctuation? (Op-Ed)

Natural fluctuations have driven Earth's climate for millennia, but they are not the cause of modern warming.

Calculus Is Fun! Math Exhibit Demos Principles of Motion

Most people probably don't think of learning calculus as fun. But a new interactive exhibit here at the Museum of Math (MoMath) lets visitors learn about the principles of motion...

Android gains in US, basic phones almost extinct

The Google Android platform grabbed the majority of mobile phones in the US market in early 2014, as consumers all but abandoned non-smartphone handsets, a survey showed Friday.

First Success Witnessed In World's Longest-Running Experiment

Here comes the pitch...  ... ... In baseball, that phrase would quickly be followed by an outcome, like strike three! But in the world's longest-running scientific experiment, waiting is the game. And so far, humans have struck out. ...

White dwarf boosts light of stellar companion

A gravitational lens in a binary star lets astronomers weigh the core of a dead star.

Downside To LED Bulbs - Like HDTV, It Makes Some Things Look Worse

If you have ever seen set pieces from a science-fiction show, you have probably been amazed at how cheap and silly the whole things looks. That was the initial concern...

New tools reveal new truths about fungi, flies, antibiotics

In the newsroom, any story about a new scientific method faces an uphill battle. In this issue are a number of stories that feature how science is done.

Animated movies made by computer

A 17-minute animated movie made with a computer in 1964 took 2,000 hours of film processing and cost $600 per minute. The 2013 animated film Frozen cost about $1.5 million...

Study: Half of jailed NYC youths have brain injury

NEW YORK (AP) -- About half of all 16- to 18-year-olds coming into New York City's jails say they had a traumatic brain injury before being...

Ah-CHOO! 7 Tickling Facts About Sneezing

Everyone knows the feeling: it begins with that insidious tickle in the back of your nose, then comes the gasping intake of breath and the final, cathartic blast: a sneeze.

All-in-One Media Keyboard offers navigation from the couch

(Phys.org) —Microsoft this week announced its All-in-One Media Keyboard. This is a peripheral that is targeted for users who want a comfortable, useful keyboard to use whether sitting on the living room couch...

Five features an Amazon phone might offer

Rumors of an Amazon smartphone reached a fever pitch this week, with The Wall Street Journal reporting that the device could be due out this year.

US newspaper industry revenue fell 2.6 pct in 2013

U.S. newspaper industry revenue continued to fall last year, as increases in circulation revenue failed to offset shrinking demand for print advertising.

Scientists Report Advance in ‘Therapeutic Cloning’

Scientists have moved a step closer to the goal of creating stem cells perfectly matched to a patient’s DNA in order to treat diseases, they announced on Thursday, creating patient-specific...

Time Is Short for High-Risk Rescue Effort

Experts said that even if passengers aboard the capsized South Korean ferry found air pockets, time was short and the risk of hypothermia was high.

Mountainous Fib: Andes Lie About Their Age

New research into the height of a very remote Andean plateau reveals just the latest surprise from the Earth's second-greatest mountain belt.

Easter Skies Feature Big Dipper and Southern Cross

As soon as darkness falls this Easter weekend, step outside and look skyward. What is the most prominent and easiest star pattern to recognize? If you live in the Northern...

Proteomics discovers link between muscle damage and cerebral malaria

Malaria-related complications remain a major cause of death for children in many parts of the world. Why some children develop these complications while others don't is still not understood. Scientists...

Novel stapled peptide nanoparticle combination prevents RSV infection, study finds

A combination of advanced technologies may lead to a therapy to prevent or treat respiratory syncytial virus, a potentially lethal respiratory infection affecting infants, young children and the elderly, new...

Target for treating dengue fever discovered

New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for dengue fever, West Nile virus, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. More than 40 percent of people around...

Multitarget TB drug could treat other diseases, evade resistance

A drug under clinical trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for a class of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance,...

Researchers uncover likely creator of Bitcoin

The primary author of the celebrated Bitcoin paper, and therefore probable creator of Bitcoin, is most likely Nick Szabo, a blogger and former George Washington University law professor, according to...

NASA Celebrates Earth Day with Public Events and Online Activities

NASA will celebrate the 44th anniversary of Earth Day with a variety of live and online activities April 21-27 to engage the public in the agency's mission to better understand...

Proteins Conspire to Make Breast Cancer Cells Resistant to Drug Treatment

Sanford-Burnham researchers discover that the interaction between two proteins called BCAR1 and BCAR3 is responsible for resistance to antiestrogen drugs, paving the way for improved diagnostic and treatment strategies.

LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

The career-focused social network LinkedIn announced Friday it has 300 million members, with more than half the total outside the United States.

Space History Photo: Standing on the Edge of the Bay

An astronaut evaluates the Portable Foot Restraint in space.

Artificial Intelligence Programs Go Head To Head

Most academics don't like competition but in the field of artificial intelligence, everyone wants to square off against the best in their discipline.In June, the International Planning Competition held every two...

The name of the fungus

A rebellion has broken out against the traditional way of naming species in the peculiar, shape-shifting world of fungi.

Building 'smart' cell-based therapies

A technology for engineering human cells as therapies has been developed by scientists. The the technology becomes activated only in diseased tissues. It sits on the surface of a cell...

Clock ticking for states to adopt health exchanges

CHICAGO (AP) -- For the more than 30 states that defaulted to the federal government under President Barack Obama's health care law, time may be running...

NSF pulls support for quake observatory

Troubled project sought to observe tremors from deep within the San Andreas fault.Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2014.15076

Why You Forget: 5 Strange Facts About Memory

Although forgetting is normal and vital to how the brain works, it sometimes happens in strange or unexplained ways.

Drug Development Deal Sours For University, Biotech Firm

UCLA and Medivation, once happy partners, now confront each other in court

Inhibited children become anxious adults: Examining the causes and effects of early shyness

Three little girls sit together in a room, playing with the toys surrounding them. One of the girls -- "Emma" -- has clearly taken charge of the group, and the...

Gene variant raises risk for aortic tear, rupture

The significance of a genetic variant that substantially increases the risk of a frequently fatal thoracic aortic dissection or full rupture has been confirmed by researchers. Thoracic aortic aneurysms, or...

Egypt's Population Boom Threatens Cultural Treasures

Soaring population growth in Egypt threatens historical buildings, monuments, and artifacts.

X-ray method could improve nuclear screening

Rapid imaging technique adapted from medical applications shows promise in detection of nuclear materials.Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2014.15071