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Rosetta spacecraft to give 'final kiss' to comet on crash-landing

TOULOUSE (Reuters) - The European spacecraft Rosetta will crash-land on the surface of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and end its 12-year space odyssey on Sept. 30, France's National Centre for Space...

Feds launch probe over Tesla's auto pilot after driver dies

Shawn PriceWASHINGTON, July 1 (UPI) -- Federal regulators have launched an investigation into the autopilot feature on Tesla Model S car after a person was killed using the system, Tesla...

Climate Change's Effect on Rocky Mountain Plant Is Driven by Sex

For the valerian plant, higher elevations in the Colorado Rocky Mountains are becoming much more co-ed. And the primary reason appears to be climate change.

Telomere length is indicator of blood count recovery in treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

The chemotherapy treatments necessary to treat Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) in children can be grueling on the body, and can cause health-related complications during therapy, as well as long down...

Frigate birds soar without landing for weeks at a time

Brooks HaysPARIS, June 30 (UPI) -- New data has revealed frigate birds as the animal kingdom's most prolific soarers.

Treating autoimmune disease without harming normal immunity

With potentially major implications for the future treatment of autoimmunity and related conditions, scientists have found a way to remove the subset of antibody-making cells that cause an autoimmune disease,...

Harnessing an innate repair mechanism enhances success of retinal transplantation

Cell replacement therapies hold promise for many age-related diseases, but efforts to bring treatments to patients have not been very successful -- in large part because the newly derived cells...

Scientists discover maleness gene in malaria mosquitoes

Scientists, led by Dr Jaroslaw Krzywinski, Head of the Vector Molecular Biology group at The Pirbright Institute have isolated a gene, which determines maleness in the species of mosquito that...

Hundreds of U.S. clinics sell unapproved stem cell 'therapies'

Amy Norton, HealthDay News Hundreds of U.S. clinics are marketing unapproved stem cell treatments for conditions ranging from aging skin to spinal cord injuries, a new study finds.

In hot water: Climate change is affecting North American fish

Climate change is already affecting inland fish across North America—including some fish that are popular with anglers. Scientists are seeing a variety of changes in how inland fish reproduce, grow...

Worked to death: Isolated professions see higher suicide rates

Farmers, lumberjacks and fishermen kill themselves most often among workers in the U.S., according to a large new study that shows enormous differences of suicide rates across jobs. Researchers found...

Ancient tomb may have been used as prehistoric telescope

A team of astronomers may have discovered a surprising double purpose for ancient structure

Thinking 'I can do better' really can improve performance, study finds

Telling yourself 'I can do better,' can make you do better at a given task, a study has found. Over 44,000 people took part in an experiment to discover what...

Risk of blindness from spine surgery down significantly

The risk of blindness caused by spinal fusion, one of the most common surgeries performed in the U.S., has dropped almost three-fold since the late 1990s, according to the largest...

Appeals court overturns Canada pipeline approval

Canada's federal court of appeal has overturned approval of the new Northern Gateway pipeline on grounds that builders failed to adequately consult with affected aboriginals, documents released Thursday revealed.

New technology could improve use of small-scale hydropower in developing nations

Engineers have created a new computer modeling package that people anywhere in the world could use to assess the potential of a stream for small-scale, 'run of river' hydropower, an...

Researchers develop effective strategy for disrupting bacterial biofilms

A new discovery provides strong evidence that an innovative therapeutic approach may be effective in the resolution of bacterial biofilm diseases.

A bewildering form of sand dune discovered on Mars

Some of the wind-sculpted sand ripples on Mars are a type not seen on Earth, and their relationship to the thin Martian atmosphere provides new clues about the atmosphere's history.

The energy spectrum of particles will help make out black holes

Scientists have devised a method of distinguishing black holes from compact massive objects that are externally indistinguishable from one another. The method involves studying the energy spectrum of particles moving...

Regorafenib shows significant survival gains in refractory liver cancer

Oral multikinase inhibitor regorafenib achieves significantly improved survival rates compared to placebo in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, according to data from the phase III RESORCE trial (1), presented at the...

Researchers identify calorie-burning pathway in fat cells

Investigators have identified a natural molecular pathway that enables cells to burn off calories as heat rather than store them as fat. This raises the possibility of a new approach...

Israeli-American girl, 13, killed by Palestinian 'terrorist' in her West Bank bedroom

Amy R. Connolly and Doug G. WareJERUSALEM, June 30 (UPI) -- A 13-year-old Israeli-American girl was killed Thursday inside her own bedroom in a Jewish West Bank settlement, in what...

Kyrie Irving responds to critics about "no black girls allowed" party

Alex ButlerCLEVELAND, June 30 (UPI) -- Not even hitting the most important jump shot in Cleveland Cavaliers history can save Kyrie Irving from Internet haters.

Artificial pancreas likely to be available by 2018

The artificial pancreas -- a device which monitors blood glucose in patients with type 1 diabetes and then automatically adjusts levels of insulin entering the body -- is likely to...

State of Emergency Declared Over Algae Blooms in Florida

The release of millions of gallons of water with blue-green algae is shutting down some of the nation's most beautiful beaches.

New study compares transportation energy efficiency of local and conventional food

A marketing specialist has compared the transportation efficiencies of the conventional and local fruit and vegetable transportation networks in the Knoxville-area surrounding the University's flagship campus.

Women with BRCA1 gene mutation at higher risk of deadly uterine cancer

Women who carry the BRCA1 gene mutation that dramatically increases their risk of breast and ovarian cancers are also at higher risk for a lethal form of uterine cancer, according...

New test helps detect drug-resistant bacteria

HealthDay News The diagnostic test for genetic markers associated with drug-resistant bacteria, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Infant bodies were 'prized' by 19th century anatomists, study suggests

A new study of the University of Cambridge anatomy collection suggests that the bodies of foetuses and babies were a "prized source of knowledge" by British scientists of the 18th...

Fukushima and the oceans: What do we know, five years on?

A major international review of the state of the oceans 5 years after the Fukushima disaster shows that radiation levels are decreasing rapidly except in the harbour area close to...

Role played by solvents at extreme pressure

Researchers investigated the behavior of the small molecule TMAO in water from normal conditions up to ten kilobars. Experiment and simulation showed that some bands in the infrared spectrum shift...

Laws encourage alternatives to prison for veterans with PTSD

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) -- Defenders of a former Army sergeant say he truly believed he was fighting the Taliban bomber who blew off...

Need skills? Corporate volunteering programs not always best place to acquire them

Corporate volunteering programs are widely credited by business leaders and volunteers for giving participants valuable work-related skills. A new study suggests there is some truth to these claims, but that...

FDA says 'no' to eating raw cookie dough

HealthDay News It's not just the raw eggs in cookie dough that carry food poisoning risk. Any type of raw dough or batter that contains flour is not safe to...

What does the sperm whale say?

When a team of researchers began listening in on seven sperm whales in the waters off the Azores, they discovered that the whales’ characteristic tapping sounds serve as a form...

Electron scavenging to mimic radiation damage

High energy radiation affects biological tissues, leading to short-term reactions. These generate, as a secondary product, electrons with low energy, referred to as LEEs, which are ultimately involved in radiation...

Netflix releases second trailer for 'Stranger Things' with Winona Ryder

Karen ButlerBEVERLY HILLS, Calif., June 30 (UPI) -- Netflix has released a second trailer for its 1980s-set, supernatural mystery series "Stranger Things."

Incidence of cancer in patients with large colorectal polyps lower than previously thought

For the majority of patients with large or difficult to remove colorectal polyps (growths in the colon), the incidence of cancer is actually lower than previously thought, and using more...

New farming strategies can help prevent soil runoff while maintaining high crop yields

Soil and nutrient loss and runoff from agricultural fields are major problems environmentally and economically in the U.S. and globally. After heavy spring rains, soil and water runoff containing fertilizer...

Trilobites: Lacking Brains, Plants Can Still Make Good Judgments About Risks

Researchers examined how pea plants grow in a study of risk assessment theory that could have applications for studies of human behavior.

New technology helps ID aggressive early breast cancer

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — When a woman is diagnosed with the earliest stage of breast cancer, how aggressive should her treatment be? Will the non-invasive cancer become invasive? Or is...

Tiger shark sonogram shows 20 babies baring their teeth

Researchers can now study pregnant tiger sharks in their natural habitat without cutting them open and killing their babies, thanks to ultrasound technology.

Natural metabolite can suppress inflammation

An international group of scientists from US, Canada, Germany and Russia has revealed a substance produced in humans that can suppress the pro-inflammatory activity of macrophages – specific cells of...

UW project highlights liability of internet 'intermediaries' in developing countries

How much liability do website owners and other online service providers have for content posted by other people? If someone posts content on your website that is defamatory, constitutes hate...

All Eyes (and Ears) on Jupiter

NASA released a recording of the Juno spacecraft crossing into Jupiter’s magnetosphere. And telescopes are zooming in to add context to Juno’s data.

The RNA that snips and stitches RNA

RNA is a fundamental molecule that codes for protein and controls gene expression, playing a part in regulating many cell responses and vital processes. The genetic information contained in premature...

Unexpected finding links cell division, glucose, and insulin

DALLAS – June 30, 2016 – Proteins that play key roles in the timing of cell division also moonlight in regulating blood sugar levels, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have...

Asteroid hunters find space rock that orbits Earth

On Asteroid Day, you may be interested to learn that the moon isn't the only space rock orbiting the Earth — a little asteroid is also doing circles around us...

Federal judge blocks Indiana's controversial abortion law

Doug G. WareINDIANAPOLIS, June 30 (UPI) -- A federal judge granted an injunction Thursday that temporarily blocks a new Indiana law that prohibits abortions based on the fetus' gender or...

Smartphone apps no help at preventing, achieving pregnancy, study says

Stephen FellerWASHINGTON, June 30 (UPI) -- Most smartphone apps purporting to help women either get pregnant or prevent pregnancy are not accurate enough to reliably do either, researchers say.

UPI Almanac for Friday, July 1, 2016

By United Press International On July 1, 1908, more than a thousand suffragettes in London attempted to rescue 28 of their fellow protesters who were arrested by police following a...

Studies testing kelp as local fix for acidifying seawater

HOOD CANAL, Wash. (AP) -- Scientist Joth Davis unspooled 150 feet of line holding thousands of tiny spores of kelp into Hood Canal...

NHTSA: Owners of 300K Honda, Acura vehicles face 'grave' risk over airbag defect

Doug G. WareWASHINGTON, June 30 (UPI) -- Federal regulators issued an urgent warning Thursday to owners of 300,000 Honda and Acura vehicles over what regulators say is a "grave" airbag...

See Captivating Photos of Refugees in a Converted School

The abandoned facility is now a place to live, learn, and play for 250 refugees.

Gene mutation 'hotspots' linked to better breast cancer outcomes

In kataegis, multiple mutations cluster in a few hotspots in a cancer genome. Here, cytosine (C) bases are commonly substituted with thymine (T) in the DNA strand. Kataegis is...

Nobel laureates challenge Greenpeace over safety of GMO crops

More than 100 Nobel laureates called on environmental group Greenpeace to end its opposition to genetically modified crops, saying there is a scientific consensus they are safe and can benefit...

Investigators: US lab worker in Colorado faked test results

DENVER (AP) -- A worker at a federal laboratory in Colorado intentionally manipulated test results for years, possibly tainting research that includes toxic...

Gingrich, Christie top Trump's running mate list

Shawn PriceNEW YORK, July 1 (UPI) -- Former House speaker Newt Gingrich and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie lead the list of Donald Trump's possible running mates, according to campaign...

Hershey board rejects takeover bid from rival Mondelez

Andrew V. Pestano and Doug G. WareHERSHEY, Pa., June 30 (UPI) -- The Hershey Company's board of directors unanimously rejected a takeover offer from rival Mondelez International on Thursday.

Bizarre Mars 'Ripples' Offer Window into Red Planet's Past

Mars harbors a mysterious kind of dune-like structure that's unlike anything seen on Earth, a new study reports. These features could yield insights about how Mars has evolved from a...

New experimental system sheds light on how memory loss may occur

Spatial memory decays when the entorhinal cortex is not functioning properly, a new mouse model shows. The study, say the authors, provides new information about how dysfunction of this circuit...

Ocean circulation implicated in past abrupt climate changes

There was a period during the last ice age when temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere went on a rollercoaster ride, plummeting and then rising again every 1,500 years or so....

Similarities found in bee and mammal social organization

New research shows similarities in the social organisation of bees and mammals, and provides insight into the genetics of social behavior for other animals. These findings, published in PLOS Computational...

New insight into the most common genetic cause of ALS, FTD

Scientists have discovered a novel function of the C9orf72 protein which is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) -- giving a new insight into the most...

Does discrimination increase drinking?

Another negative health outcome linked to discrimination has been uncovered by research: alcohol abuse.

Researchers discover first sleeper goby cavefish in Western Hemisphere

Researchers have described a new genus and species of cavefish from Mexico - the Oaxaca Cave Sleeper. It has not been collected or seen in more than 20 years and...

Inherited cholesterol disorder significantly boosts heart risks

HealthDay News People who inherit a disorder that causes high levels of LDL cholesterol have an increased risk for heart disease and hardened arteries, a new study finds.

Shape-changing 'smart' material: Heat, light stimulate self-assembly

Researchers have developed a unique, multifunctional smart material that can change shape from heat or light and assemble and disassemble itself. This is the first time researchers have been able...

UK Author And Collaborator APC Relief At PeerJ

In light of the "leave" result in the June 23rd United Kingdom EU referendum, PeerJ will be offering a $100 discount to any publication with a UK author.

New material, picked by computers, could boost power of vacuum electronics

Modern tools like microwave ovens and X-ray machines that are powered by intense, focused beams of electrons are ubiquitous, but many of the materials in those devices have remained largely...

Plague: A Scourge From Ancient to Modern Times

Plague is often associated with the Middle Ages, but the infamous disease wreaked havoc before and after that time, and continues to infect people today.

[Report] Direct time-domain observation of attosecond final-state lifetimes in photoemission from solids

Attosecond spectroscopic techniques have made it possible to measure differences in transport times for photoelectrons from localized core levels and delocalized valence bands in solids. We report the application of...

Seniors with undiagnosed hearing loss can become isolated

Senior citizens with undiagnosed or untreated hearing problems are more likely to suffer from social isolation and cognitive impairment, a UBC study has found. UBC Okanagan researchers examined the impact...

MRI technique induces strong, enduring visual association

Volunteers in a brain science experiment learned associations between patterns and color such that when shown the patterns later, they were still biased to perceive the color even if it...

Zebrafish reveal the ups and downs of vision

Researchers have shed light on how we perceive and recognize specific visual stimuli.

Thales, Cisco sign cybersecurity agreement

Geoff ZiezulewiczWASHINGTON, June 30 (UPI) -- Cisco and Thales announced a new cybersecurity partnership Wednesday to develop cyber detection and counter-attack solutions, Thales announced.

Journey to Jupiter: NASA spacecraft nears planet rendezvous

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Jupiter takes center stage with the arrival next week of a NASA spacecraft built to peek through its thick,...

All signs point to health: Arrows on grocery floors increased the proportion of produce spending

Fruit and vegetable availability is often assumed to be a purchase barrier, yet fruit and vegetable availability does not necessarily result in frequent purchases. Rather, in-store marketing of less-healthy foods...

The promise of fluorescent polymer gels

Researchers at MIT are making fluorescent polymer gels that change color when they’re shaken, heated, exposed to acid, or otherwise disrupted. Given such a response, these novel materials could be...

Quantum computer simulates fundamental particle interactions for the first time

Trapped ions model the creation and annihilation of electron–positron pairs

Wildfire in Northern California threatening 2,600 buildings

Shawn PriceSACRAMENTO, June 30 (UPI) -- A Northern California wildfire has grown to more than 1,500 acres, threatening about 2,600 structures north east of Sacramento, the U.S. Forest Service said.

Falls in months before surgery are common in adults of all ages

Falling up to six months before an elective surgery was common and caused injuries among adults of all ages, according to researchers. Surprisingly, the frequency of falls among middle-aged patients...

New effort uses implementation science to reduce mother-to-child HIV transmission

An emerging field, known as implementation science, may help reduce the nearly 150,000 instances of mother-to-child HIV transmissions that occur annually around the world, mostly in developing countries. A team...

How will genomics enter day-to-day medicine?

A quiet transformation has been brewing in medicine, as large-scale DNA results become increasingly available to patients and healthcare providers. Amid a cascade of data, physicians, counselors and families are...

New research may help to develop effective pain killers

If you have ever chopped chilies and then accidentally touched your eyes you will be familiar with the burning sensation that this causes. However, the substance responsible for this sensation...

Weight-loss technologies train the brain to resist temptation

Can a computer game train your brain to resist sweets? The game is designed to improve a person's "inhibitory control," the part of the brain that stops you from giving...

Erasing unpleasant memories with a genetic switch

Dementia, accidents, or traumatic events can make us lose the memories formed before the injury or the onset of the disease. Researchers have now shown that some memories can also...

Chemoradiotherapy after surgery for gastric cancer shows similar outcomes to post-operative chemotherapy

A phase III trial finds no significant difference in overall survival of having chemoradiotherapy after surgery for gastric cancer compared to post-operative chemotherapy.

New method tells growers more about citrus decay

With citrus growers trying to save their groves in the wake of the deadly greening disease, a researcher has found a new technique that could help growers answer a vexing...

Bioinformatics software developed to predict effect of cancer-associated mutations

A new piece of software has been developed that analyses mutations in proteins. These mutations are potential inducers of diseases, such as cancer. The development is free, easy, versatile and,...

Scientist's math formula offers improved yield for flour milling

Research by a University of Huddersfield scientist could aid the development of new strains of wheat that yield higher quantities of extra-nutritious flour.

Antidiabetic effects discovered in the appetite hormone CART

The appetite hormone CART is regulated by glucose and is found in greater quantity in people with type 2 diabetes, researchers have discovered.

Chaotic orbit of Comet Halley explained

Astronomers have found an explanation for the chaotic behavior of the orbit of Halley's Comet.

The irony of awkward: Study shows the effects of problematic media on social withdrawal for young millennials

Not all withdrawn individuals are the same, but for emerging adults who do everything they can to avoid social interaction, combining that with things like violent video games or pornography...

Brilliant hard drive quality with magnetic field sensors made of diamond

Quantum mechanics is not only of high interest in fundamental research. The current progress in quantum technologies promises numerous innovations of industrial relevance, which will be transferred into the economy...

Report points to racial disparities in most forms of political participation in California

Latinos and Asian Americans are the least likely to have a say in California's politics, during election cycles and year round. That is one of the key findings of a...

A little spark for sharper sight

Stimulating the brain with a mild electrical current can temporarily sharpen vision without glasses or contacts, researchers have found.

Scientists develop computer models to unravel the complexities of TB infection

Scientists used computers to model the formation of tuberculosis granulomas in the lung -- the non-active (latent) form of infection found in 2 billion individuals worldwide (11 million in the...

Tracking brain atrophy in MS could become routine, thanks to new software

The loss of brain tissue, called brain atrophy, is a normal part of aging, but multiple sclerosis (MS) accelerates the process. Such atrophy is a critical indicator of physical and...

3 treatments seem to help combat binge-eating disorder

Dennis Thompson, HealthDay News New research finds that people struggling with binge-eating disorder may have at least three treatment options to help them curtail their eating.