Popular Science articles about Psychology & Sociology

Most north Seattle caregivers spent a small fraction of their playground time on a cell phone, and interactions were most often brief.

Bragging: Researchers find self-promotion often backfires

Bragging to coworkers about a recent promotion, or posting a photo of your brand new car on Facebook, may seem like harmless ways to share good news.

College readiness declines when school's focus is improving test scores, study finds

University of Illinois education professor Anjale D. Welton is the co-author of a study that explored efforts to maintain a college-going culture at one Texas high school. Illinois alumna Montrischa M. Williams of the American Institutes for Research co-wrote the paper.Education reform policies that penalize struggling schools for poor standardized test scores may hinder -- not improve -- students' college readiness, if a school's instructional focus becomes improving its test...

When the baby comes, working couples no longer share housework equally

When highly educated, dual-career couples have their first child, both spouses think the baby increases their workloads by equal amounts -- but a new study suggests that's not true.

Popular electric brain stimulation method detrimental to IQ scores

This is Flavio Frohlich, PhD of the UNC School of Medicine.Using a weak electric current in an attempt to boost brainpower or treat conditions has become popular among scientists and do-it-yourselfers, but a new University of North Carolina School of...

Real stereotypes continue to exist in virtual worlds

This image shows three levels of attractiveness in avatars from World of Warcraft.Stereotypes related to gender and appearance that burden women in the real world could follow them into virtual ones, according to researchers.

Wild bearded capuchin monkeys really know how to crack a nut

This image shows the male capuchin monkey, Jatobá, cracking a tucum nut.When it comes to cracking nuts, wild bearded capuchin monkeys are more skilled than anyone had given them credit for, according to researchers who report new findings in the Cell...

Can cheap wine taste great? Brain imaging and marketing placebo effects

When consumers taste cheap wine and rate it highly because they believe it is expensive, is it because prejudice has blinded them to the actual taste, or has prejudice actually...

High-pitched sounds cause seizures in old cats

Kuching Mahal (which means 'cat expensive' in Indonesian), a 16-year-old Birman that experiences feline audiogenic reflex seizures.When the charity International Cat Care asked veterinary neurologists at Davies Veterinary Specialists, UK, for help with several enquiries it had received regarding cats having seizures, seemingly in response to...

Expert panels successfully rate medical research proposals

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is easily the world's largest funder of medical research, and outside scientists perform most of the research. Panels of these investigators also select the...

Better social media techniques increase fan interest, engagement

Due to the ever-increasing number of people using social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, businesses and organizations, such as professional sports teams, are expanding their marketing and communication...

NYU researchers ID part of the brain for processing speech

A team of New York University neuroscientists has identified a part of the brain exclusively devoted to processing speech. Its findings point to the superior temporal sulcus (STS), located in the temporal lobe, and help settle a long-standing debate about...

Related science articles

New insights into the male bias of autism

Male toddlers with autism have significant structural differences in their brains compared to females with the condition, according to research published in the open access journal Molecular Autism.

Long-term study on ticks reveals shifting migration patterns, disease risks

This is a tick infographic.Over nearly 15 years spent studying ticks, Indiana University's Keith Clay has found southern Indiana to be an oasis free from Lyme disease, the condition most associated with these arachnids...

How climate science denial affects the scientific community

Climate change denial in public discourse may encourage climate scientists to over-emphasise scientific uncertainty and is also affecting how they themselves speak -- and perhaps even think -- about their...

America's best teachers get creative

A study by Michigan State University scholars Danah Henriksen, right, and Punya Mishra finds that America's best teachers use their own creative interests to help students learn, such as the San Diego instructor who raps his algebra lessons.While U.S. educational policy emphasizes high-stakes testing and scripted lessons, the best teachers in the business are taking creative risks -- often drawing from their own interests and hobbies --...

Rumors have it

Bad news, fans of rational political discourse: A study by an MIT researcher shows that attempts to debunk political rumors may only reinforce their strength.

The science behind spite

Psychology, biology, and mathematics have come together to show that the occurrence of altruism and spite -- helping or harming others at a cost to oneself -- depends on similarity...

Locusts provide insight into brain response to stimuli, senses

Baranidharan Raman, Ph.D., and his team trained locusts to recognize odors to learn more about how the brain processes stimuli.By training a type of grasshopper to recognize odors, a team of biomedical engineers at Washington University in St. Louis is learning more about the brain and how it processes...

Texas A&M study finds we think better on our feet, literally

Preliminary results show 12 percent greater on-task engagement in classrooms with standing desks, which equates to an extra seven minutes per hour of engaged instruction time.A study from the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts. In fact, preliminary results show...

Scientists create the sensation of invisibility

Ph.D. student Zakaryah Abdulkarim, M.D.,  shows how to create the illusion of invisibility in the lab (photomontage).The power of invisibility has long fascinated man and inspired the works of many great authors and philosophers. In a study from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet, a team of neuroscientists now...

Iowa State researchers test brain activity to identify cybersecurity threats

Iowa State researchers measured brain activity to better understand cybersecurity threats and identify what motivates employees to violate company policy.The old adage that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link certainly applies to the risk organizations face in defending against cybersecurity threats. Employees pose a danger...

More news about Psychology & Sociology

Breaking science news from the newsfeed about Psychology & Sociology