Popular Science articles about Psychology & Sociology

Personality test finds Britain's most extroverted, agreeable and emotionally stable regions

A survey of almost 400,000 British residents has highlighted significant differences in personalities between regions. Amongst its finding, it shows Scots to be amongst the friendliest and most co-operative residents, Londoners the most open and Welsh people the least emotionally...

Moral decisions can be influenced by eye tracking

Our opinions are affected by what our eyes are focusing on in the same instant we make moral decisions. Researchers at Lund University and other institutions have managed to influence...

How Millennials get their news

Millennials are anything but "newsless," passive, or uninterested in civic issues, according to a new comprehensive study of the information habits of people age 18-34. The research looks closely at...

'Sharenting' trends: Do parents share too much about kids on social media?

Do 'sharents' go too far in creating a digital identity for kids before they're even old enough to have a Facebook account themselves?Some of social media's greatest stars aren't even old enough to tweet: Pictures of kids playing dress up, having meltdowns and even in the bathtub adorn Facebook walls. Diaper-donning toddlers...

Nearly 70 percent of evangelicals do not view religion, science as being in conflict

Media and popular culture might portray religion and science as being at odds, but new research from Rice University suggests just the opposite.

Brain waves predict our risk for insomnia

There may not yet be a cure for insomnia, but Concordia University researchers are a step closer to predicting who is most likely to suffer from it -- just in...

March Madness brackets: Flipping a coin is your best bet

Each year, millions of people lose billions of dollars in NCAA March Madness basketball pools. Still, most return the following year for another pummeling.

Study simulates changes to admissions criteria for NYC's specialized high schools

New York City's eighth graders are anxiously waiting to find out which high school they'll be attending in the fall. Six percent of students will end up at one of...

Marriage more likely to end in divorce when wives get sick, according to ISU study

Amelia Karraker studies how different factors can impact well-being later in life. Her latest study looks at illness and divorce.Countless couples have recited the words, 'in sickness and in health' on their wedding day with the intention of honoring those vows. But as it turns out, that may be...

Social circles

If you live in a city, you know that a fair amount of your movement around town is social in nature. But how much, exactly? A new study co-authored by...

Teacher prejudices put girls off math, science

It's a fact: Women are vastly underrepresented in the fields of computer science, engineering, and mathematics. But less clear are the trajectories -- academic and otherwise -- that lead young...

How much math, science homework is too much?

When it comes to adolescents with math and science homework, more isn't necessarily better -- an hour a day is optimal -- but doing it alone and regularly produces the biggest knowledge gain, according to research published by the American...

Teens' approach to social media risk is different from adults'

For every parent who ever wondered what the heck their teens were thinking when they posted risky information or pictures on social media, a team of Penn State researchers suggests...

A more tolerant America?

As the nation's headlines turn more and more to issues of tolerance -- race, religion, free speech, same sex marriage -- research by San Diego State University Psychology Professor Jean...

Ben-Gurion U. Researchers Develop Groundbreaking Approach to Evaluate Sleep Disorders

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have developed a groundbreaking approach to determine sleep quality using their new breath sound analysis (BSA). This is less expensive and invasive than...

Political liberals display greater happiness, UCI study finds

What does it mean to be happy? Is it how happy you say you are, or is it how happy you act? Previous research has found that political conservatives report...

Look, something shiny! How color images can influence consumers

Which radio would you choose? A study at The Ohio State University found that the answer depends on whether you see the images in color or black and white.When it comes to buying things, our brains can't see the big, black-and-white forest for all the tiny, colorful trees.

Move over Mozart: Study shows cats prefer their own beat

As more animal shelters, primate centers and zoos start to play music for their charges, it's still not clear whether and how human music affects animals.

Study: Men tend to be more narcissistic than women

A study by Emily Grijalva, Ph.D., assistant professor of organization and human resources in the UB School of Management, has shown that men, on average, are more narcissistic than women.With three decades of data from more than 475,000 participants, a new study on narcissism from the University at Buffalo School of Management reveals that men, on average, are more...

People use handshakes to sniff each other out

Scientists find that people use the touch of a handshake to sample and sniff signaling molecules. A sterile glove was used to identify signaling molecules transmitted via a handshake.Limp or firm, your handshake conveys subliminal social cues. Now, research reveals it also transmits chemical signals that could explain why the greeting evolved in the first place.

Bumblebees make false memories too

New evidence suggests bumblebees may experience 'confusion' between flower patterns.It's well known that our human memory can fail us. People can be forgetful, and they can sometimes also "remember" things incorrectly, with devastating consequences in the classroom, courtroom, and...

Workplace negativity can hurt productivity

Russell Johnson is an associate professor of management in Michigan State University's Broad College of Business.Employees who point out problems in the office may help the company improve, but could be hurting themselves in the process.

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