Popular Science articles about Psychology & Sociology

Election surprises tend to erode trust in government

When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top. When that doesn't happen, according to a new study from the University of Georgia, these "surprised losers" often have...

Greater odds of adverse childhood experiences in those with military service

Men and women who have served in the military have a higher prevalence of adverse childhood events (ACEs), suggesting that enlistment may be a way to escape adversity...

Dog jealousy: Study suggests primordial origins for the 'green-eyed monster'

This image depicts emotion researcher Christine Harris, professor of psychology at UC San Diego, with Samwise, one of three border collies to inspire the study on dog jealousy.This will not surprise most dog owners: Dogs can act jealous, finds a new study from the University of California, San Diego. Darwin thought so, too. But emotion researchers have...

Missing sleep may hurt your memory

A study co-investigated at the Sleep and Learning Lab at Michigan State University found that lack of sleep may hurt memory.Lack of sleep, already considered a public health epidemic, can also lead to errors in memory, finds a new study by researchers at Michigan State University and the University of...

I'll have what he's having? How consumers make choices about new products

Have you found yourself at a fancy restaurant trying to impress new friends or in a foreign country and unsure of what to order? Not wanting to appear foolish, you...

Danish DNA could be key to happiness

Genetics could be the key to explaining nation's levels of happiness, according to research from the University of Warwick.

People in leadership positions may sacrifice privacy for security

People with higher job status may be more willing to compromise privacy for security reasons and also be more determined to carry out those decisions, according to researchers.

Months before their first words, babies' brains rehearse speech mechanics

A year-old baby sits in a brain scanner, called magnetoencephalography -- a noninvasive approach to measuring brain activity. The baby listens to speech sounds like "da" and "ta" played over headphones while researchers record her brain responses.Infants can tell the difference between sounds of all languages until about 8 months of age when their brains start to focus only on the sounds they hear around them....

Say 'no' to interruptions, 'yes' to better work

Modern office workers are expected to multitask regularly, often juggling multiple projects and priorities over the course of a day. Studies have shown that the typical employee in an office...

3D printed anatomy to mark a new era for medical training

The creators of a unique kit containing anatomical body parts produced by 3D printing say it will revolutionise medical education and training, especially in countries where cadaver use is problematical.The creators of a unique kit containing anatomical body parts produced by 3D printing say it will revolutionize medical education and training, especially in countries where cadaver use is problematical.

Do women perceive other women in red as more sexually receptive?

Previous research has shown that men perceive the color red on a woman to be a signal of sexual receptivity. Women are more likely to wear a red shirt when...

This is a 3-D reconstruction of skull compound fracture and endocranial surface changes.

'Big picture' thinking doesn't always lead people to indulge less, study says

Self-focus plays an important role in how consumers make decisions, says new research from University of Illinois business professor Ravi Mehta.Buy the latest electronic gizmo du jour, or use that money to fix a leaky roof? Go out with friends, or stay home to catch-up on work to meet that...

Try, try again? Study says no

When it comes to learning languages, adults and children have different strengths. Adults excel at absorbing the vocabulary needed to navigate a grocery store or order food in a restaurant,...

Empathy or justice: What makes consumers donate more to charity?

Have you ever received a request for help and wondered how deserving the recipients are of your donation? This way of thinking may seem inconsistent with your moral values, especially...

Large twin study suggests that language delay due more to nature than nurture

University of Kansas Distinguished Professor Mabel Rice directs a longitudinal study of language development in 1,000 sets of Australian twins from birth through adolescence.A study of 473 sets of twins followed since birth found that compared to single-born children, 47 percent of 24-month-old identical twins had language delay compared to 31 percent of...

Do urban casinos increase local crime? Not in this case study

Researchers from Drexel and Temple University found that crime rates in the Fishtown neighborhood of Philadelphia were largely unaffected by the introduction of SugarHouse Casino.Philadelphia's SugarHouse Casino opened its doors in September 2010 after years of protests from community members who feared that the casino would lead to an increase in neighborhood crime. However,...

Marijuana dependence alters the brain's response to drug paraphernalia

Dr. Francesca Filbey, professor at the University of Texas at Dallas, found that drug paraphernalia triggers the reward areas of the brain differently in dependent and non-dependent marijuana users.New research from The University of Texas at Dallas demonstrates that drug paraphernalia triggers the reward areas of the brain differently in dependent and non-dependent marijuana users.

Research: Business should embrace 'boomerang employees'

The phenomenon of "boomerang employees" is not unique to professional athletes, says two studies co-written by T. Brad Harris, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.The return of LeBron James to the Cleveland Cavaliers may have riveted the sports world and social media, but the phenomenon of "going home," whether to a geographic location or...

Study rebuts negative reputation of 'No Child Left Behind'

The public perception that No Child Left Behind has increased burnout and lowered job satisfaction among teachers is unfounded, according to a recent study co-authored by UT Dallas researcher Dr. James R. Harrington.The public perception that No Child Left Behind has increased burnout and lowered job satisfaction among teachers is unfounded, according to a recent study co-authored by UT Dallas researcher Dr....

Brain activity in sex addiction mirrors that of drug addiction

Pornography triggers brain activity in people with compulsive sexual behaviour -- known commonly as sex addiction -- similar to that triggered by drugs in the brains of drug addicts, according...

Your next Angry Birds opponent could be a robot

A robot plays Angry Birds using a tablet. Researchers see their system as a future rehabilitation tool for children with cognitive and motor-skill disabilities.With the help of a smart tablet and Angry Birds, children can now do something typically reserved for engineers and computer scientists: program a robot to learn new skills. The...

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