Popular Science articles about Psychology & Sociology

Research letter: Viewers ate more while watching Hollywood action flick on TV

Television shows filled with action and sound may be bad for your waistline. TV viewers ate more M&Ms, cookies, carrots and grapes while watching an excerpt from a Hollywood action film than those watching an interview program.

Computer games give a boost to English

This is Liss Kerstin Sylvén, associate professor in Subject Didactics specializing in Languages, University of Gothenburg.If you want to make a mark in the world of computer games you had better have a good English vocabulary. It has now also been scientifically proven that someone...

Neuroscientists reverse memories' emotional associations

Most memories have some kind of emotion associated with them: Recalling the week you just spent at the beach probably makes you feel happy, while reflecting on being bullied provokes...

Self-deceived individuals deceive others better

Over confident people can fool others into believing they are more talented than they actually are, a study has found.

Group identity emphasized more by those who just make the cut

People and institutions who are marginal members of a high-status or well-esteemed group tend to emphasize their group membership more than those who are squarely entrenched members of the group,...

Study finds less domestic violence among married couples who smoke pot

New research findings from a study of 634 couples found that the more often they smoked marijuana, the less likely they were to engage in domestic violence.

Fact or fiction: Which do moviegoers prefer?

Do you feel sadder watching a documentary about war or a drama about a young person dying of cancer? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research,...

No purchase required to win? Devoted customers not so sure

You've probably seen -- or even participated in -- promotional contests offered by retailers in which they say "no purchase required to win."

Latino children make greatest gains in NC Pre-K

A new summary of 12 years of research on North Carolina's pre-kindergarten program for at-risk 4-year-olds shows that "dual-language learners" make the greatest academic progress in the program. According to...

Feeling bad at work can be a good thing (and vice versa)

Research by the University of Liverpool suggests that, contrary to popular opinion, it can be good to feel bad at work, whilst feeling good in the workplace can also lead...

Abusive leadership infects entire team

Bosses who are verbally abusive to individual workers can infect the entire work team with hostility, finds a study led by Crystal Farh from Michigan State University.Supervisors who are abusive to individual employees can actually throw the entire work team into conflict, hurting productivity, finds new research led by a Michigan State University business scholar.

Electric current to brain boosts memory

Stimulating a particular region in the brain via non-invasive delivery of electrical current using magnetic pulses, called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, improves memory, reports a new Northwestern Medicine® study.

IU study: Social class makes a difference in how children tackle classroom problems

This is Jessica McCrory Calarco, Indiana University.An Indiana University study has found that social class can account for differences in how parents coach their children to manage classroom challenges. Such differences can affect a child's education...

Orphaned children can do just as well in institutions

The removal of institutions or group homes will not lead to better child well-being and could even worsen outcomes for some orphaned and separated children, according to new findings from...

Stone-tipped spears lethal, may indicate early cognitive and social skills

Spears were carefully constructed to measure the same for the controlled experiments.Attaching a stone tip on to a wooden spear shaft was a significant innovation for early modern humans living around 500,000 years ago. However, it was also a costly behavior...

In sync and in control?

In the aftermath of the Aug. 9 shooting of an 18-year-old African American man by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, much of the nation's attention has been focused...

How do former churchgoers build a new moral identity?

As their moral perspectives change, disillusioned churchgoers find it increasingly difficult to remain associated with their church, yet many also find it difficult to leave. According to a new study...

Outsourcing parenthood? It takes a village AND the marketplace to raise a child

Ask any parent raising kids in today's fast-paced society and chances are they would agree that there are only so many hours in the day. Recognizing a need for help,...

Sleep drunkenness disorder may affect 1 in 7

A study is shining new light on a sleep disorder called "sleep drunkenness." The disorder may be as prevalent as affecting one in every seven people. The research is published...

In our digital world, are young people losing the ability to read emotions?

This is Yalda Uhls, University of California - Los Angeles. Find more on the study <a target="_blank"href="http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/in-our-digital-world-are-young-people-losing-the-ability-to-read-emotions">here</a>.Children's social skills may be declining as they have less time for face-to-face interaction due to their increased use of digital media, according to a UCLA psychology study.

Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us: New study

Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us -- they are more extroverted, agreeable and open -- attributes that make them successful in the demanding, fast-paced and often stressful...

Love makes sex better for most women

Love and commitment can make sex physically more satisfying for many women, according to a Penn State Abington sociologist.

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