Popular Science articles about Psychology & Sociology

New evidence of suicide epidemic among India's 'marginalized' farmers

A new study has found that India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with the most debt-ridden farmers who are clinging to tiny smallholdings -- less than one hectare -- and trying to grow 'cash crops', such as...

Creative activities outside work can improve job performance

Employees who pursue creative activities outside of work may find that these activities boost their performance on the job, according to a new study by San Francisco State University organizational...

Brain changes are associated with casual marijuana use in young adults

The size and shape of two brain regions involved in emotion and motivation may differ in young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week, according to a study...

Study provides new insight into how toddlers learn verbs

Parents can help toddlers' language skills by showing them a variety of examples of different actions, according to new research from the University of Liverpool.

Related science articles

The Lancet: Functional brain imaging reliably predicts which vegetative patients have potential to recover consciousness

A functional brain imaging technique known as positron emission tomography (PET) is a promising tool for determining which severely brain damaged individuals in vegetative states have the potential to recover...

When identity marketing backfires: Consumers don't like to be told what they like

When choosy moms choose Jif peanut butter and sports fans who call themselves sports fans subscribe to DirecTV, identity marketing is hard at work. But what happens when this type...

Study gives high marks to NC Pre-K program

FPG's new findings on North Carolina pre-K add to a growing body of evidence about the benefits of quality pre-kindergarten programs.Scientists from UNC's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute have released their new study of NC Pre-K, the state's program to prepare four-year-olds for success in kindergarten. According to FPG's...

See what a child will look like using automated age-progression software

Using one photo of a 3-year-old, the software automatically renders images of his face at multiple ages while keeping his identity (and the milk moustache).It's a guessing game parents like to ponder: What will my child look like when she grows up? A computer could now answer the question in less than a minute.

Location matters when it comes to deal-making, says new study

Christopher Liu is an assistant professor of srategy at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management. His research explores spatial networks: how geography shapes the ability of individuals and firms to enter into some (but not other) relationships and networks. Empirical settings for his work have ranged from scientists working within a biotechnology firm to the US Senate Chamber. He also has a long-standing interest on scientists, innovation and productivity, and continues to actively conduct research in this area.Even six-year-olds know who you sit beside matters, whether you're in first grade or at a high-powered dinner.

Are Southern death-row inmates more polite?

Southern states are known to uphold a culture of honor and adhere to traditional politeness norms, but does this hold true for death-row convicts? A new article published today in...

Twitter use linked to infidelity and divorce, MU study finds

Twitter and other social networking services have revolutionized the way people create and maintain relationships. However, new research shows that Twitter use could actually be damaging to users' romantic relationships....

Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the happy couple. The...

Atypical brain connectivity associated with autism spectrum disorder

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in adolescents appears to be associated with atypical connectivity in the brain involving the systems that help people infer what others are thinking and understand the...

Using video surveillance to measure peoples' hand washing habits

One of the best defenses against infectious disease is one of the most simple -- hand washing.

Neuroscientists: Brain activity may mark the beginning of memories

By tracking brain activity when an animal stops to look around its environment, neuroscientists at the Johns Hopkins University believe they can mark the birth of a memory.

Charitable donation discrepancies: Why are some countries more generous than others?

When it comes to charitable giving, some countries open their collective wallets more than others. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, people who live in...

Lashing out at your spouse? Check your blood sugar

Brad Bushman, professor of communication and psychology at Ohio State University, holds one of the voodoo dolls used in the study.Lower levels of blood sugar may make married people angrier at their spouses and even more likely to lash out aggressively, new research reveals.

Single mothers don't delay marriage just to boost tax credit, study says

When the Earned Income Tax Credit was expanded in 1993, supporters hoped it would reward poor parents for working while critics feared that it might discourage single mothers from marrying...

Can animals really help people in hospitals, aged care?

From left: Delta Therapy Dog handler and University of Adelaide Masters in Health Psychology student Marie Dow, with her dog Nilfisk, who regularly visits the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Adelaide as part of the Delta Therapy Dog program, and the University's Head of the School of Psychology, Professor Anna Chur-Hansen.While many people have an opinion on whether animals can help to improve wellbeing and care for patients in hospitals, does anyone really know whether there are benefits both for...

Stressful environments genetically affect African-American boys

African American boys growing up in disadvantaged environments have shorter telomeres -- DNA sequences related to aging -- than their advantaged peers by age 9, a Wilson School study shows. Telomeres live at the end of chromosomes, which are found in cells. They vary in lengthy by person, shrinking with age. Growing up in disadvantaged environments quicken this process for black boys, causing physiological weathering.Stressful upbringings can leave imprints on the genes of children as young as age 9, according to a study led by Princeton University and Pennsylvania State University researchers. Such chronic...

Rice U. study: Creativity and innovation need to talk more

Creativity and innovation are not sufficiently integrated in either the business world or academic research, according to a new study by Rice University, the University of Edinburgh and Brunel University.

Researchers empower parents to inspire first-generation college-goers

Parents who have not attended college are at a disadvantage when it comes to talking about higher education with their kids -- yet these are the students who most need...

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