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In this image, a juvenile male Zed eats clay.

First measurements taken of South Africa's Iron Age magnetic field history

Magnetic field strength in the South Atlantic Anomaly is shown.A team of researchers has for the first time recovered a magnetic field record from ancient minerals for Iron Age southern Africa (between 1000 and 1500 AD). The data,...

Scripps researchers map out trajectory of April 2015 earthquake in Nepal

Researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have accurately mapped out the movement of the devastating 7.8-magnitude Nepal earthquake that killed over 9,000 and injured over 23,000...

Small oxygen jump helped enable early animals take first breaths

If oxygen was a driver of the early evolution of animals, only a slight bump in oxygen levels facilitated it, according to a multi-institutional research team that includes a

Hair ice mystery solved

Hair ice was found in a forest near Moosseedorf, Switzerland.You may have never seen or heard of it, but hair ice - a type of ice that has the shape of fine, silky hairs and resembles white candy floss...

Economic slump, not natural gas boom, responsible for drop in CO2 emissions

The 11 percent decrease in climate change-causing carbon dioxide emissions in the U.S. between 2007 and 2013 was caused by the global financial recession - not the reduced use of...

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Ocean acidification may cause dramatic changes to phytoplankton

Oceans have absorbed up to 30 percent of human-made carbon dioxide around the world, storing dissolved carbon for hundreds of years. As the uptake of carbon dioxide has increased in...

Warming slow-down not the end of climate change, study shows

A slow-down in global warming is not a sign that climate change is ending, but a natural blip in an otherwise long-term upwards trend, research shows.

Marine plankton brighten clouds over Southern Ocean

Tiny ocean life contribute to clouds directly, by being lofted up with sea spray, and indirectly, by producing sulfurous gas.Nobody knows what our skies looked like before fossil fuel burning began; today, about half the cloud droplets in Northern Hemisphere skies formed around particles of pollution. Cloudy skies help...

Study finds surprisingly high geothermal heating beneath West Antarctic Ice Sheet

UCSC researchers lowered a geothermal probe through a borehole in the West Antarctic ice sheet to measure temperatures in the sediments beneath half a mile of ice.The amount of heat flowing toward the base of the West Antarctic ice sheet from geothermal sources deep within the Earth is surprisingly high, according to a new study led...

Washington, DC sinking fast, adding to threat of sea-level rise

New research led by University of Vermont scientists Paul Bierman (left), and by his former graduate student, Ben DeJong (right), confirms that the land under the Chesapeake Bay is sinking rapidly and projects that Washington, DC, could drop by six or more inches in the next century -- adding to the problems of sea-level rise. The study also shows that this sinking land will continue, unabated, for tens of thousands of years.New research confirms that the land under the Chesapeake Bay is sinking rapidly and projects that Washington, D.C., could drop by six or more inches in the next century--adding to...

'Carbon sink' detected underneath world's deserts

The world's deserts may be storing some of the climate-changing carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, a new study suggests. Massive aquifers underneath deserts could hold more carbon than all...

Study finds abrupt climate change may have rocked the cradle of civilization

Ali Pourmand (left) and Ph.D. candidate Arash Sharifi visually inspect the physical properties of a sediment core collected from NW Iran. This meter-long core recorded the environmental condition of the region for the past 2000 years.New research reveals that some of the earliest civilizations in the Middle East and the Fertile Crescent may have been affected by abrupt climate change. These findings show that while...

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Keep Tahoe blue? Less algae, not clarity, key for lake's blueness

UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center postdoctoral scholar Shohei Watanabe collects data from a UC Davis-NASA research buoy to measure Lake Tahoe's blueness.Lake Tahoe's iconic blueness is most strongly related to algae, not clarity, according to research released today from the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center, or TERC. In the "Tahoe:...

Shallow fracking raises questions for water, new Stanford research shows

The United States now produces about as much crude oil as Saudi Arabia does, and enough natural gas to export in large quantities. That's thanks to hydraulic fracturing, a mining...

Satellites peer into rock 50 miles beneath Tibetan Plateau

Topography (left) and a shaded relief map (right) of the rock deep beneath the Tibetan Plateau are shown. Color indicates kilometers below Earth's surface.Gravity data captured by satellite has allowed researchers to take a closer look at the geology deep beneath the Tibetan Plateau.

Cool summer of 2013 boosted Arctic sea ice

The volume of Arctic sea ice increased by a third after the summer of 2013 as the unusually cool air temperatures prevented the ice from melting, according to UCL and...

As the oceans warm, wide-ranging species will have an edge

This is a yellowtail amberjack (<em>Seriola lalandi</em>), one of several Pacific coastal species that has extended its range.Marine species that already have large ranges are extending their territories fastest in response to climate change, according to new research from University of British Columbia biodiversity experts.

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Polar bears experience limited energy savings in summer, new study finds

A young polar bear on pack ice over deep waters in the Arctic Ocean, October 2009.Polar bears are unlikely to physiologically compensate for extended food deprivation associated with the ongoing loss of sea ice, according to one-of-its-kind research conducted by University of Wyoming scientists and...

Submerged volcano cluster discovered off coast of Sydney

Australia's new ocean-going research vessel Investigator has discovered extinct volcanoes likely to be 50 million years old about 250 kilometres off the coast of Sydney. The largest is 1.5 kilometres across the rim and rises 700 metres from the sea floor.Australia's new ocean-going research vessel Investigator has discovered extinct volcanoes likely to be 50 million years old about 250 kilometres off the coast of Sydney.

NOAA, partners predict severe harmful algal bloom for Lake Erie

NOAA and its research partners, using an ensemble modeling approach, predict that the 2015 western Lake Erie harmful algal bloom season will be among the most severe in recent years...

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