Popular Science articles about Earth & Climate

How cracking explains underwater volcanoes and the Hawaiian bend

University of Sydney geoscientists have helped prove that some of the ocean's underwater volcanoes did not erupt from hot spots in Earth's mantle but instead formed from cracks or fractures in the oceanic crust.

'Dead zones' found in Atlantic open waters

<p>The dead-zone eddies found in the <i>Biogeosciences</i> study are somewhat similar to the one seen in this picture, which was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on NASA's Terra satellite in late 2011.

<p>More images, a video, and the pre-print version of the paper are available at: <a target="_blank"href="http://www.egu.eu/news/165/dead-zones-found-in-atlantic-open-waters/">http://www.egu.eu/news/165/dead-zones-found-in-atlantic-open-waters/</a>.A team of German and Canadian researchers have discovered areas with extremely low levels of oxygen in the tropical North Atlantic, several hundred kilometres off the coast of West Africa....

Closing the case on an ancient archeological mystery

Barley cultivation in Jiuzhaigou National Park hasn't changed much in nearly 2,000 years. The park is located in the Min Shan mountain range, Northern Sichuan in South Western China.Climate change may be responsible for the abrupt collapse of civilization on the fringes of the Tibetan Plateau around 2000 B.C.

Research seeks alternatives for reducing bacteria in fresh produce using nanoengineering

Nearly half of foodborne illnesses in the U.S. from 1998 through 2008 have been attributed to contaminated fresh produce. Prevention and control of bacterial contamination on fresh produce is critical...

Megacity metabolism: Is your city consuming a balanced diet?

Megacities such as Seoul, Korea (pictured) are home to 6.7 per cent of the world's population, yet they consume 9.3 per cent of global electricity and produce 12.6 per cent of global wasteNew York is an energy hog, London and Paris use relatively fewer resources and Tokyo conserves water like a pro. These are just a few of the findings from a...

Bigger bang for your buck: Restoring fish habitat by removing barriers

Breeding migrations of native Great Lakes fishes, like the suckers shown here, are often blocked by impassable road crossings and dams.A few years ago, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Limnology created the first map of all the road crossings and dams blocking the tributary rivers that feed...

Tidal tugs on Teflon faults drive slow-slipping earthquakes

The study includes slow-slip events of about magnitude 6.6 generated on the Cascadia fault from 2007 to 2012. Along the bottom axis is the time in days, up to six weeks. The vertical axis is the distance in kilometers along the fault. Calculations looked at slipping for locations between the two dashed green lines, which spans roughly Olympia, Wash., to southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia.Unknown to most people, the Pacific Northwest experiences a magnitude-6.6 earthquake about once a year. The reason nobody notices is that the movement happens slowly and deep underground, in a...

Thawing permafrost feeds climate change

Assistant Professor of Oceanography Robert Spencer led a team that spent more than three months in Siberia between 2012 and 2014 to study thawing permafrost.Carbon, held in frozen permafrost soils for tens of thousands of years, is being released as Arctic regions of the Earth warm and is further fueling global climate change, according...

Earthquake potential where there is no earthquake history

It may seem unlikely that a large earthquake would take place hundreds of kilometers away from a tectonic plate boundary, in areas with low levels of strain on the crust...

Hurdles to US climate change action are in economics and politics, not divided science

The U.S. Congress successfully hears the "supermajority" consensus on the reality and causes of climate change, according to scientists from Texas A&M University, Idaho State University, and University of Oklahoma....

Global warming progressing at moderate rate, empirical data suggest

A new study based on 1,000 years of temperature records suggests global warming is not progressing as fast as it would under the most severe emissions scenarios outlined by the...

Princeton University researchers "weighed" Antarctica's ice sheet using gravitational satellite data and found that from 2003 to 2014, the ice sheet lost 92 billion tons of ice per year.

Researchers find 200-year lag between climate events in Greenland, Antarctica

Donald Voigt examines an ice core at WAIS Divide, Antarctica.A new study using evidence from a highly detailed ice core from West Antarctica shows a consistent link between abrupt temperature changes on Greenland and Antarctica during the last ice...

Whitening the Arctic Ocean: May restore sea ice, but not climate

This graph depicts high-latitude (60&deg;-90&deg;N) surface air temperatures under different conditions simulated in the study over a 50 year period. The solid black line indicates current carbon dioxide levels, the solid red line depicts four times preindustrial carbon dioxide levels, the blue dashed line represents alterations imposed to increase reflection of sunlight energy back into space north of 70&deg;N, the brown dashed line represents alterations imposed to increase reflection of sunlight energy back into space north of 80&deg;N, the purple dashed line represents alterations imposed to increase reflection of sunlight energy back into space between 70 and 80&deg;N.  Boxes on the right show the mean (with two standard errors) while whiskers indicate min/max range over the last 30 years.Some scientists have suggested that global warming could melt frozen ground in the Arctic, releasing vast amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere, greatly amplifying global warming....

Dust from the Sahara Desert cools the Iberian Peninsula

This image shows dust intrusion from the Sahara Desert.Spanish and Portuguese researchers have analysed the composition and radiative effect of desert aerosols during two episodes which simultaneously affected Badajoz (Spain) and Évora (Portugal) in August 2012. Results show...

UT research uncovers lakes, signs of life under Antarctica's dry valleys

A helicopter begins a survey with an airborne electromagnetic sensor at Bull Pass in the Wright Valley, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.Many view Antarctica as a frozen wasteland. Turns out there are hidden interconnected lakes underneath its dry valleys that could sustain life and shed light on ancient climate change.

Claims about the decline of the West are 'exaggerated'

A new paper by Oxford researchers argues that some countries in Western Europe, and the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand now have birth rates that are now relatively close...

Scientists see deeper Yellowstone magma

A new University of Utah study in the journal <i>Science</i> provides the first complete view of the plumbing system that supplies hot and partly molten rock from the Yellowstone hotspot to the Yellowstone supervolcano. The study revealed a gigantic magma reservoir beneath the previously known magma chamber. This cross-section illustration cutting southwest-northeast under Yelowstone depicts the view revealed by seismic imaging. Seismologists say new techniques have provided a better view of Yellowstone's plumbing system, and that it hasn't grown larger or closer to erupting. They estimate the annual chance of a Yellowstone supervolcano eruption is 1 in 700,000.University of Utah seismologists discovered and made images of a reservoir of hot, partly molten rock 12 to 28 miles beneath the Yellowstone supervolcano, and it is 4.4 times larger...

High mountains warming faster than expected

Elevation-dependent warming is a poorly observed phenomenon that requires urgent attention to ensure that potentially important changes in high mountain environments are adequately monitored by the global observational network," say members of the Mountain Research Initiative Working Group.High elevation environments around the world may be warming much faster than previously thought, according to members of an international research team including Raymond Bradley, director of the Climate System...

Arctic beetles may be ideal marker of climate change

McGill researchers believe that Arctic beetles may prove to be ideal markers of climate change, since any changes in climate that affect the soil, plants and animals on which the beetles depend are likely to be quickly reflected in changes in the beetle communities.Wanna know about climate change? Ask a beetle.

Fishing impacts on the Great Barrier Reef

Shown are reef fish on the Great Barrier Reef.New research shows that fishing is having a significant impact on the make-up of fish populations of the Great Barrier Reef.

Study: Soil nutrients may limit ability of plants to slow climate change

Many scientists assume that the growing level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will accelerate plant growth. However, a new study co-written by University of Montana researchers suggests much of...

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