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Brandon VanderBeek, a doctoral student at the University of Oregon, led a study that investigated interactions of the Earth's mantle and tectonic plates off the coast of Washington state.

Monsoon intensity enhanced by heat captured by desert dust

Monsoon rains fall on the green valleys of Madhya Pradesh, India.Variations in the ability of sand particles kicked into the atmosphere from deserts in the Middle East to absorb heat can change the intensity of the Indian Summer Monsoon, according...

New study reveals where MH370 debris more likely to be found

iagram showing the estimated flight path of MH370 (in red) based on military radar and satellite data analysis, as well as the current underwater search area (smaller rectangle) and the region (in green) where new research indicates the wreckage is most likely to be. The green area in the map marks the location where the five confirmed debris found so far (also marked in the image) are most likely to have originated from.

Modified from Figure 1 of Jansen <i>et al</i>., <i>Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci</i> (2016) by the lead author of the paper.A team of researchers in Italy has used the location of confirmed debris from MH370 to determine where the airliner might have crashed, and where further debris could be found....

Water resilience that flows

Automated data loggers were installed in the challenging conditions of the tropical wet-dry forest, here on private property along the Potrero River, Costa Rica.Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become...

Ancient temples in the Himalaya reveal signs of past earthquakes

This is a damaged and clamped pillar at Lakshi Narayan temple, Chamba, India. Damage likely to have occurred during the 1555 Kashmir earthquake.Tilted pillars, cracked steps, and sliding stone canopies in a number of 7th-century A.D. temples in northwest India are among the telltale signs that seismologists are using to reconstruct the...

Measure of age in soil nitrogen could help precision agriculture

Illinois professor Praveen Kumar and graduate student Dong K. Woo developed a model to tell the age of inorganic nitrogen in soil, which could help farmers more precisely apply fertilizer to croplands.What's good for crops is not always good for the environment. Nitrogen, a key nutrient for plants, can cause problems when it leaches into water supplies. University of Illinois engineers...

Satellite tracks the remnants of Tropical Storm Georgette

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured a visible image of the remnants of former Tropical Storm Georgette.Tropical Storm Georgette faded fast in the Eastern Pacific and NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the remnant clouds.

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Why Americans waste so much food

Even though American consumers throw away about 80 billion pounds of food a year, only about half are aware that food waste is a problem. Even more, researchers have identified...

Can palm oil be sustainable?

This image shows oil palm in Cameroon. Land used for palm oil production could be nearly doubled without expanding into protected or high-biodiversity forests, according to a new study published in the journal <em>Global Environmental Change</em>.Land used for palm oil production could be nearly doubled without expanding into protected or high-biodiversity forests, according to a new study published in the journal Global Environmental Change. The...

Oceans may be large, overlooked source of hydrogen gas

Deposits of serpentinized rock such as this could be a previously overlooked source of free hydrogen gas, a new Duke study finds.Rocks formed beneath the ocean floor by fast-spreading tectonic plates may be a large and previously overlooked source of free hydrogen gas (H2), a new Duke University study suggests.

North American forests unlikely to save us from climate change, study finds

A sub-alpine forest in Colorado. Forests in the southwestern US are expected to be among the hardest-hit, according to the projections resulting from the study.30 percent of human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide -- a strong greenhouse gas -- and are therefore considered to play a crucial role in mitigating the speed and magnitude of...

Keep a lid on it: Utah State University geologists probe geological carbon storage

An outcrop of the Carmel Formation near Interstate-70 in the San Rafael Swell in southeastern Utah, USA. Utah State University geologists, with collaborators from Cambridge University, Shell Global Solutions, Tennessee's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Germany's J&uuml;lich Center for Neutron Science, probed the Carmel caprock to assess the feasibility of effective carbon capture and storage (CCS) in underground reservoirs.Effective carbon capture and storage or "CCS" in underground reservoirs is one possible way to meet ambitious climate change targets demanded by countries and international partnerships around the world. But...

CO2 can be stored underground for 10 times the length needed to avoid climatic impact

Image shows a cold water geyser driven by carbon dioxide erupting from an unplugged oil exploration well drilled in 1936 into a  natural CO2 reservoir in Utah.Study of natural-occurring 100,000 year-old CO2 reservoirs shows no significant corroding of 'cap rock', suggesting the greenhouse gas hasn't leaked back out - one of the main concerns with greenhouse...

Forests, species on 4 continents threatened by palm oil expansion

As palm oil production expands from Southeast Asia into tropical regions of the Americas and Africa, vulnerable forests and species on four continents face increased risk of loss, a new...

High chance that current atmospheric GHGs commit to warmings greater than 1.5C over land

Current levels of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations already commit the planet to air temperatures over many land regions being eventually warmed by greater than 1.5°C, according to new research published...

NASA's IMERG shows Darby's rainfall over the Hawaiian Islands

IMERG calculated that the greatest rainfall total estimates between July 19 and 26 were located north of Oahu where 480 mm (18.9 inches) fell.Most of the Hawaiian Islands were spared serious damage from Tropical Storm Darby. NASA estimated the rainfall left behind from the storm and found more than a foot and half...

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Marine carbon sinking rates confirm importance of polar oceans

Results show that the transfer efficiency of organic carbon from the surface to the deep ocean ranges from just 5 percent in the subtropics to around 25 percent near the poles.About the same amount of atmospheric carbon that goes into creating plants on land goes into the bodies of tiny marine plants known as plankton. When these plants die and...

Can't see the wood for the climbers -- the vines threatening our tropical forests

Instead of taking decades to recover, tropical forests are at risk of taking hundreds of years to re-grow because of lianas, which spread rapidly following extensive tree-felling.

Mines hydrology research provides 'missing link' in water modeling

GOLDEN, Colo., July 21, 2016 ? Groundbreaking research on global water supply co-authored by Colorado School of Mines Hydrology Professor Reed Maxwell and alumna Laura Condon, now assistant professor of...

Super-eruptions may give a year's warning before they blow

One of the 73 quartz crystals used in the study. They averaged about one millimeter in diameter.Super-eruptions -- volcanic events large enough to devastate the entire planet -- give only about a year's warning before they blow.

Birds on top of the world, with nowhere to go

Shorebird, the ruddy turnstone (<i>Arenaria interpres</i>) at snow patch edge on the tundra in Zackenberg, Greenland.Climate change could make much of the Arctic unsuitable for millions of migratory birds that travel north to breed each year, according to a new international study published today in...

2016 climate trends continue to break records

The first six months of 2016 were the warmest six-month period in NASA's modern temperature record, which dates to 1880.Two key climate change indicators -- global surface temperatures and Arctic sea ice extent -- have broken numerous records through the first half of 2016, according to NASA analyses of...

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