Popular Science articles about Earth & Climate

First national study finds trees saving lives, reducing respiratory problems

In the first broad-scale estimate of air pollution removal by trees nationwide, U.S. Forest Service scientists and collaborators calculated that trees are saving more than 850 human lives a year and preventing 670,000 incidents of acute respiratory symptoms.

New research suggests Saharan dust is key to the formation of Bahamas' Great Bank

Distribution of insoluble material in the sediments and collection sites are shown. The insoluble material is derived from atmospheric dust.A new study suggests that Saharan dust played a major role in the formation of the Bahamas islands. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and...

Corn & soy insecticides similar to nicotine found widespread in Midwest rivers -- USGS news

These are locations of sites in Iowa sampled for neonicotinoids in 2013. Watersheds for the Mississippi River and Missouri River sites are shown in the inset.Insecticides similar to nicotine, known as neonicotinoids, were found commonly in streams throughout the Midwest, according to a new USGS study. This is the first broad-scale investigation of neonicotinoid insecticides...

Jeju Island is a live volcano

These are pictures of the sedimentary layer containing charcoal found on a stony mountain developing site in Sangchang-ri, and the carbonized wood sample used for the radiocarbon dating. Thick lava covers the upper gravel layer.In Jeju, Korea, a place emerging as a world-famous vacation spot with natural tourism resources, a recent study revealed a volcanic eruption occurred on the island. The Korea Institute of...

Climate: Meat turns up the heat

Eating meat contributes to climate change, due to greenhouse gasses emitted by livestock. New research finds that livestock emissions are on the rise and that beef cattle are responsible for...

Replacing coal and oil with natural gas will not help fight global warming

Both shale gas and conventional natural gas have a larger greenhouse gas footprint than do coal or oil, especially for the primary uses of residential and commercial heating.

CU, Old Dominion team finds sea level rise in western tropical Pacific anthropogenic

A new study led by Old Dominion University and the University of Colorado Boulder indicates sea levels likely will continue to rise in the tropical Pacific Ocean off the coasts...

UM-led research team contributes to the management of South Florida coastal environments

This is a map of the South Florida coastal ecosystem studied during the MARES project.A Florida-based marine research team has developed a unique formal process and modeling framework to help manage South Florida's economically important coastal marine environments. The MARES project (Marine and Estuarine...

New view of Rainier's volcanic plumbing

This image was made by measuring how the ground conducts or resists electricity in a study co-authored by geophysicist Phil Wannamaker of the University of Utah Energy & Geoscience Institute. It  shows the underground plumbing system that provides molten and partly molten rock to the magma chamber beneath the Mount Rainier volcano in Washington state. The scale at left is miles depth. The scale at bottom is miles from the Pacific Coast. The Juan de Fuca plate of Earth's Pacific seafloor crust and upper mantle is shown in blue on the left half of the image as it dives or 
'subducts' eastward beneath Washington state. The reddish orange and yellow colors represent molten and partly molten rock forming atop the Juan de Fuca plate or 'slab.' The image shows the rock begins to melt about 50 miles beneath Mount Rainier (the red triangle at top). Some is pulled downward and eastward as the slab keeps diving, but other melts move upward to the orange magma chamber shown under but west of Mount Rainier. The line of sensors used to make this image were placed north of the 14,410-foot peak, so the image may be showing a lobe of the magma chamber that extends northwest of the mountain. Red ovals on the left half of the page are the hypocenters of earthquakes.By measuring how fast Earth conducts electricity and seismic waves, a University of Utah researcher and colleagues made a detailed picture of Mount Rainier's deep volcanic plumbing and partly molten...

Dispersant from Deepwater Horizon spill found to persist in the environment

This is Helen White on a Gulf coast beach holding a jetty rock with oil residue on it.The 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill in the Gulf of Mexico was the largest accidental release of oil into the ocean, with approximately 210 million gallons gushing from the blown...

Tracking the breakup of Arctic summer sea ice

A cartoon of sensors now installed in the Arctic Ocean. Weather stations (green) sit on the ice. Ice-tethered buoys (yellow boxes) take measurements under the ice. Wave sensors (red) sit on the ice and in open water. Swimming robots (yellow) can travel in open water and below the ice, where they navigate using sound sources (gray boxes).As sea ice begins to melt back toward its late September minimum, it is being watched as never before. Scientists have put sensors on and under ice in the Beaufort...

Fire ecology manipulation by California native cultures

Before the colonial era, 100,000s of people lived on the land now called California, and many of their cultures manipulated fire to control the availability of plants they used for food, fuel, tools, and ritual. Contemporary tribes continue to use...

NSU researcher part of team studying ways to better predict intensity of hurricanes

They are something we take very seriously in Florida -- hurricanes. The names roll off the tongue like a list of villains -- Andrew, Charlie, Frances and Wilma.

How much magma is hiding beneath our feet?

Molten rock (or magma) has a strong influence on our planet and its inhabitants, causing destructive volcanic eruptions and generating some of the giant mineral deposits. Our understanding of these...

Global warming 'pause' since 1998 reflects natural fluctuation

Statistical analysis of average global temperatures between 1998 and 2013 shows that the slowdown in global warming during this period is consistent with natural variations in temperature, according to research...

NRL reveals new meteorological insight into mid-level clouds

Research meteorologists at the US Naval Research Laboratory Marine Meteorology Division and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, employing the Navy's Mid-Course Doppler Radar at Cape Canaveral, were able to characterize mid-level, mixed phase altocumulus clouds in unprecedented detail. The plot depicts the MCR-derived vertical velocity with the solid red and blue contours bounding upward and downward motion, respectively. The white curves depict the cloud layer position and the dashed blue line the peak cloud top radiative cooling. The black arrows depict cloud circulation features. The radiation-induced subsidence is shown by the horizontally oriented ellipses near cloud-top.Research meteorologists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Marine Meteorology Division (MMD) and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, employing the Navy's Mid-Course Doppler Radar (MCR) at Cape Canaveral, were able...

Examining the causes of a devastating debris flow

Storm-triggered landslides cause loss of life, property damage, and landscape alterations. For instance, the remnants of Hurricane Camille in 1969 caused 109 deaths in central Virginia, after 600 mm of...

Mixing it up: Study provides new insight into Southern Ocean behaviour

This image shows sensors from the DIMES project being used in the Drake Passage.A new study has found that turbulent mixing in the deep waters of the Southern Ocean, which has a profound effect on global ocean circulation and climate, varies with the...

The rate at which groundwater reservoirs are being depleted is increasing

In what parts of the world and to what degree have groundwater reservoirs been depleted over the past 50 years? The Frankfurt hydrologist Prof. Petra Döll has been researching this...

Borneo deforested 30 percent over past 40 years

Forest cover in Borneo may have declined by up to 30% over the past 40 years, according to a study published July 16, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE...

Rainwater discovered at new depths

University of Southampton researchers have found that rainwater can penetrate below the Earth's fractured upper crust, which could have major implications for our understanding of earthquakes and the generation of...

Belize's lobster, conch, and fish populations rebuild in no-take zones

This image depicts fishermen processing conch in Belize's  coastal waters. A new report from the Wildlife Conservation Society reveals that no-take zones can help conch, lobster, and other economically valuable species recover from overfishing.A new report from the Wildlife Conservation Society shows that no-take zones in Belize can not only help economically valuable species such as lobster, conch, and fish recover from overfishing,...

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