Popular Science articles about Earth & Climate

This golden-winged warbler spends the breeding season in the Cumberland Mountains of Tennessee.

Pilot plant for the removal of extreme gas charges from deep waters installed

This is the pit Lake Guadiana in the former mining area Herrerias in Andalusia, Spain.Being part of the mining area Herrerias in Andalusia, deep waters of Pit Lake Guadiana show extremely high concentration of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2). In the case of a spontaneous...

Colorado River Delta greener after engineered pulse of water

Water being released from Morelos Dam in the first environmental release of water to the Colorado River Delta. The Minute 319 pulse flow of water started March 23, 2014 and ended May 18, 2014.The engineered spring flood that brought water to previously dry reaches of the lower Colorado River and its delta resulted in greener vegetation, the germination of new vegetation along the...

Improving forecasts for rain-on-snow flooding

Many of the worst West Coast winter floods pack a double punch. Heavy rains and melting snow wash down the mountains together to breach riverbanks, wash out roads and flood...

Ancient, hydrogen-rich waters discovered deep underground at locations around the world

Energy-rich waters discharge kilometers below the surface in a South African mine.A team of scientists, led by the University of Toronto's Barbara Sherwood Lollar, has mapped the location of hydrogen-rich waters found trapped kilometres beneath Earth's surface in rock fractures in...

Guelph researchers recipe: Cook farm waste into energy

It takes some cooking, but turning farm waste into biofuels is now possible and makes economic sense, according to preliminary research from the University of Guelph.

Policy action urgently needed to protect Hawaii's dolphins

The best way to protect wild spinner dolphins in Hawaii while also maintaining the local tourism industry that depends on them is through a combination of federal regulations and community-based...

Even in restored forests, extreme weather strongly influences wildfire's impacts

The 2013 Rim Fire, the largest wildland fire ever recorded in the Sierra Nevada region, is still fresh in the minds of Californians, as is the urgent need to bring...

Study reveals abundance of microplastics in the world's deep seas

The deep sea is becoming a collecting ground for plastic waste, according to research led by scientists from Plymouth University and Natural History Museum.

Migrating 'supraglacial' lakes could trigger future Greenland ice loss

Supraglacial lakes on the Greenland ice sheet can be seen as dark blue specks in the center and to the right of this satellite image.Predictions of Greenland ice loss and its impact on rising sea levels may have been greatly underestimated, according to scientists at the University of Leeds.

Damming beavers are slowly changing the world

There are consequences of the successful efforts worldwide to save beavers from extinction. Along with the strong increase in their population over the past 100 years, these furry aquatic rodents...

How will climate change transform agriculture?

Climate change impacts will require major but very uncertain transformations of global agriculture systems by mid-century, according to new research from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.

Report: Clearing rainforests distorts wind and water, packs climate wallop beyond carbon

A new study released today presents powerful evidence that clearing trees not only spews carbon into the atmosphere, but also triggers major shifts in rainfall and increased temperatures worldwide that...

NOAA/NASA satellite sees holiday lights brighten cities

City lights shine brighter during the holidays in the US when compared with the rest of the year, as shown using a new analysis of daily data from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite. Dark green pixels are areas where lights are 50 percent brighter, or more, during December.Even from space, holidays shine bright.

Massive study provides first detailed look at how Greenland's ice is vanishing

The surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet. A new study uses NASA data to provide the first detailed reconstruction of how the ice sheet and its many glaciers are changing. The research was led by University at Buffalo geologist Beata Csatho.The Greenland Ice Sheet is the second-largest body of ice on Earth. It covers an area about five times the size of New York State and Kansas combined, and if...

NASA satellites measure increase of Sun's energy absorbed in the Arctic

NASA satellite instruments have observed a marked increase in solar radiation absorbed in the Arctic since the year 2000 -- a trend that aligns with the steady decrease in Arctic...

Global carbon dioxide emissions increase to new all-time record, but growth is slowing down

2013 saw global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use and cement production reach a new all-time high. This was mainly due to the continuing steady increase in energy use in...

Australia's coastal observation network may aid in understanding of extreme ocean events

A network of nine reference sites off the Australian coast is providing the latest physical, chemical, and biological information to help scientists better understand Australia's coastal seas, according to a...

North Atlantic signalled Ice Age thaw 1,000 years before it happened, reveals new research

The Atlantic Ocean at mid-depths may have given out early warning signals -- 1,000 years in advance -- that the last Ice Age was going to end, scientists report today...

Glacier beds can get slipperier at higher sliding speeds

Neal Iverson developed the Iowa State University Sliding Simulator to test how glaciers slide over their beds.As a glacier's sliding speed increases, the bed beneath the glacier can grow slipperier, according to laboratory experiments conducted by Iowa State University glaciologists.

Climate change could leave cities more in the dark

This is a list of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal region cities whose power grids are most vulnerable to increased hurricane damage because of climate change.Cities like Miami are all too familiar with hurricane-related power outages. But a Johns Hopkins University analysis finds climate change will give other major metro areas a lot to worry...

Past global warming similar to today's

Sediment cores that were drilled from Wyoming's Bighorn Basin and then sectioned for study are shown at a repository at the University of Bremen, Germany. A study of the cores led by University of Utah geochemist Gabe Bowen found that carbon emissions to the atmosphere during a global warming period almost 56 million years ago were more similar to today's human-caused climate change than previously was believed.The rate at which carbon emissions warmed Earth's climate almost 56 million years ago resembles modern, human-caused global warming much more than previously believed, but involved two pulses of carbon...

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