This graphic shows the intensity of lightning flashes averaged over the year in the lower 48 states during 2011.

Scientists generate first human stomach tissue in lab with stem cells

Scientists used pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, three-dimensional human stomach tissue in a laboratory -- creating an unprecedented tool for researching the development and diseases of an organ central...

Boosts in productivity of corn and other crops modify Northern Hemisphere carbon dioxide cycle

Each year in the Northern Hemisphere, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide drop in the summer as plants "inhale," then climb again as they exhale after the growing season.

Putting batteries in a kidsafe coat of armor

A Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) led team has developed a simple "coat of armor" to encase small batteries, rendering them harmless if they are ever swallowed. Children, particularly infants...

Hubble sees 'ghost light' from dead galaxies

Massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744, nicknamed Pandora's Cluster, takes on a ghostly look where total starlight has been artificially colored blue in this Hubble view.NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has picked up the faint, ghostly glow of stars ejected from ancient galaxies that were gravitationally ripped apart several billion years ago. The mayhem happened 4...

Archaeologists discover remains of Ice Age infants in Alaska

University of Alaska Fairbanks professors Ben Potter and Josh Reuther excavate the burial pit at the Upward Sun River site.The remains of two Ice Age infants, buried more than 11,000 years ago at a site in Alaska, represent the youngest human remains ever found in northern North America, according...

Where did all the oil go?

This image shows hydrocarbon contamination from Deepwater Horizon overlaid on sea floor bathymetry, highlighting the 1,250 square mile area identified in the study.Due to the environmental disaster's unprecedented scope, assessing the damage caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico has been a challenge. One unsolved puzzle is...

NUS researchers discover for the first time that a rare bush frog breeds in bamboo

Researchers from the National University of Singapore have discovered a new reproductive mode in frogs and toads -- breeding and laying direct developing eggs in live bamboo with narrow openings -- which was observed in the white spotted bush frog (<i>Raorchestes chalazodes</i>).Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have discovered a new reproductive mode in frogs and toads -- breeding and laying direct developing eggs in live bamboo with narrow...

Ancient auditory illusions reflected in prehistoric art?

Here are prehistoric paintings of hoofed animals in a cave with thunderous reverberations located in Bhimbetka, India.Some of humankind's earliest and most mysterious artistic achievements -- including prehistoric cave paintings, canyon petroglyphs and megalithic structures such as Stonehenge -- may have been inspired by the behaviors...

Disorder + disorder = more disorder?

Chaos is not necessarily bad for us if we know how to counteract it with a little properly applied disorder of our own.If you took the junk from the back of your closet and combined it with the dirty laundry already on your floor, you would have an even bigger mess. While...

Study shows marijuana's long-term effects on the brain

The effects of chronic marijuana use on the brain may depend on age of first use and duration of use, according to researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at The...

Emerging disease could wipe out American, European salamanders

Mortality was 100 percent among Eastern red-spotted newts (<i>Nothophthalmus viridescens</i>) exposed to a fungus from Asia that recently reached Europe, probably carried by salamanders in the pet shop trade. This newt, shown in its juvenile stage, is a North American native and a popular aquarium pet.A deadly disease that is wiping out salamanders in parts of Europe will inevitably reach the U.S. through the international wildlife trade unless steps are taken to halt its spread,...

Calming the plasma edge: The tail that wags the dog

This is a comparison of visible light from a reference no-Li discharge and one with Li injection in DIII-D. Li-II visible emission is primarily green in this image from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak that General Atomics operates for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have demonstrated the ability of lithium injections to transiently double the temperature and pressure...

Intimidating chimpanzee males are more likely to become fathers

Chimpanzee males that treat females aggressively father more offspring over time. The findings, in the Cell Press journal <i>Current Biology</i> on Nov. 13, are based on genetic evidence of paternity and suggest that sexual coercion via long-term intimidation is an adaptive strategy for males in chimpanzee society.Chimpanzee males that treat females aggressively father more offspring over time. The findings, in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on November 13, are based on genetic evidence of paternity...

Complete 9,000-year-old frozen bison mummy found in Siberia

Many large charismatic mammals went extinct at the end of the Ice Age (approx 11,000 years ago), including the Steppe bison, Bison priscus. A recent find in Eastern Siberia has...

Magnetic fields frozen into meteorite grains tell a shocking tale of solar system birth

Magnetic field lines (green) weave through the cloud of dusty gas surrounding the newborn Sun. In the foreground are asteroids and chondrules, the building blocks of chondritic meteorites. While solar magnetic fields dominate the region near the Sun, out where the asteroids orbit, chondrules preserve a record of varying local magnetic fields.The most accurate laboratory measurements yet made of magnetic fields trapped in grains within a primitive meteorite are providing important clues to how the early solar system evolved. The measurements...

Scientific collaborative publishes landmark study on the evolution of insects

Dr. Michelle Trautwein, Assistant Curator of Dipterology at the California Academy of Sciences, added fly expertise to a first-ever evolutionary roadmap of insects. Study results suggest insects first developed wings before any other animal, over 400 million years ago.An international team of more than 100 researchers--including Dr. Michelle Trautwein of the California Academy of Sciences--has published the first modern roadmap of insect evolution. Understanding how insects are related...

Study finds laundry detergent pods, serious poisoning risk for children

Laundry detergent pods began appearing on U.S. store shelves in early 2012, and people have used them in growing numbers ever since. The small packets can be tossed into a...

New insights into an old bird

The dodo is among the most famous extinct creatures, and a poster child for human-caused extinction events. Despite its notoriety, and the fact that the species was alive during recorded...

Climate change impacts countered by stricter fisheries management

This is a basket full of paddle-tail snappers. A newly published 17-year study by the Wildlife Conservation Society has found that implementing stricter fisheries management overcame the expected detrimental effects of climate change disturbances in coral reef fisheries badly impacted by the 1997/98 El Nino.A new study has found that implementing stricter fisheries management overcame the expected detrimental effects of climate change disturbances in coral reef fisheries badly impacted by the 1997/98 El Niño,...

NASA computer model provides a new portrait of carbon dioxide

An ultra-high-resolution NASA computer model has given scientists a stunning new look at how carbon dioxide in the atmosphere travels around the globe.

First amphibious ichthyosaur discovered, filling evolutionary gap

The first fossil of an amphibious ichthyosaur has been discovered in China by a team led by researchers at the University of California, Davis. The discovery is the first to...