Empathy or justice: What makes consumers donate more to charity?

Have you ever received a request for help and wondered how deserving the recipients are of your donation? This way of thinking may seem inconsistent with your moral values, especially if you consider yourself an otherwise compassionate and empathic person....

Why do challenging tasks make consumers believe drugs wear off faster?

Imagine that you have a cup of coffee and sit down to read People magazine. How long do you think the energy boost will last before you reach for another...

Viral therapy could boost limb-saving cancer treatment

Viruses designed to target and kill cancer cells could boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy to the arms and legs and help avoid amputation, a new study reports.

Bats use polarized light to navigate

Scientists have discovered that greater mouse-eared bats use polarisation patterns in the sky to navigate -- the first mammal that's known to do this.

Jeju Island is a live volcano

These are pictures of the sedimentary layer containing charcoal found on a stony mountain developing site in Sangchang-ri, and the carbonized wood sample used for the radiocarbon dating. Thick lava covers the upper gravel layer.In Jeju, Korea, a place emerging as a world-famous vacation spot with natural tourism resources, a recent study revealed a volcanic eruption occurred on the island. The Korea Institute of...

Creating optical cables out of thin air

This is an illustration of an air waveguide. The filaments leave 'holes' in the air (red rods) that reflect light. Light (arrows) passing between these holes stays focused and intense.Imagine being able to instantaneously run an optical cable or fiber to any point on Earth, or even into space. That's what Howard Milchberg, professor of physics and electrical and...

Global warming 'pause' since 1998 reflects natural fluctuation

Statistical analysis of average global temperatures between 1998 and 2013 shows that the slowdown in global warming during this period is consistent with natural variations in temperature, according to research...

Seals forage at offshore wind farms

This is an aerial view of Sheringham Shoal wind farm.By using sophisticated GPS tracking to monitor seals' every movement, researchers have shown for the first time that some individuals are repeatedly drawn to offshore wind farms and pipelines. Those...

Researchers simplify process to purify water using seed extracts

Researchers have streamlined and simplified a process that uses extracts from seeds of Moringa oleifa trees to purify water, reducing levels of harmful bacteria by 90% to 99%. The hardy...

Climate: Meat turns up the heat

Eating meat contributes to climate change, due to greenhouse gasses emitted by livestock. New research finds that livestock emissions are on the rise and that beef cattle are responsible for...

Study provides insights into birds' migration routes

This is a songbird.By tracking hybrids between songbird species, investigators have found that migration routes are under genetic control and could be preventing interbreeding. The research, which is published in Ecology Letters, was...

I'll have what he's having? How consumers make choices about new products

Have you found yourself at a fancy restaurant trying to impress new friends or in a foreign country and unsure of what to order? Not wanting to appear foolish, you just go along with everyone else. According to a new...

Alaska frogs reach record lows in extreme temperature survival

An Alaska wood frog creates a hibernacula from duff and leaf litter in a spruce forest on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus in preparation for the long winter freeze.Freezing and thawing might not be good for the average steak, but it seems to help wood frogs each fall as they prepare to survive Alaska's winter cold.

Law of physics governs airplane evolution

This graph shows how -- as the years have passed -- bigger and bigger airplanes have joined the ranks of their behemoth brothers.Researchers believe they now know why the supersonic trans-Atlantic Concorde aircraft went the way of the dodo -- it hit an evolutionary cul-de-sac.

'Comb on a chip' powers new NIST/Caltech atomic clock design

This image depicts NIST physicists Scott Diddams (left) and Scott Papp with a prototype atomic clock based on a chip-scale frequency comb. Diddams is holding the silicon chip, which fits into the clock apparatus on the table. With performance improvements and further reductions in size, the technology might eventually be used to make portable tools for measuring time and frequency.Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have demonstrated a new design for an atomic clock that is based on a...

Self-cooling solar cells boost power, last longer

This drawing demonstrates how solar cells cool themselves by shepherding away unwanted thermal radiation. The pyramid structures made of silica glass provide maximal radiative cooling capability.Scientists may have overcome one of the major hurdles in developing high-efficiency, long-lasting solar cells -- keeping them cool, even in the blistering heat of the noonday sun.

Mammoth and mastodon behavior was less roam, more stay at home

Research led by the University of Cincinnati's Brooke Crowley, posing with this mammoth mandible, has uncovered some interesting ideas about mammoth and mastodon behavior.Their scruffy beards weren't ironic, but there are reasons mammoths and mastodons could have been the hipsters of the Ice Age.

Oregon chemists eye improved thin films with metal substitution

Maisha K. Kamunde-Devonish, a doctoral student at the University of Oregon, led a study that led to a low-energy, solution-based mineral substitution process for making a precursor to transparent thin films. The paper was featured on the cover of the ACS journal Inorganic Chemistry.The yield so far is small, but chemists at the University of Oregon have developed a low-energy, solution-based mineral substitution process to make a precursor to transparent thin films that...

NRL reveals new meteorological insight into mid-level clouds

Research meteorologists at the US Naval Research Laboratory Marine Meteorology Division and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, employing the Navy's Mid-Course Doppler Radar at Cape Canaveral, were able to characterize mid-level, mixed phase altocumulus clouds in unprecedented detail. The plot depicts the MCR-derived vertical velocity with the solid red and blue contours bounding upward and downward motion, respectively. The white curves depict the cloud layer position and the dashed blue line the peak cloud top radiative cooling. The black arrows depict cloud circulation features. The radiation-induced subsidence is shown by the horizontally oriented ellipses near cloud-top.Research meteorologists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Marine Meteorology Division (MMD) and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, employing the Navy's Mid-Course Doppler Radar (MCR) at Cape Canaveral, were able...

Replacing coal and oil with natural gas will not help fight global warming

Both shale gas and conventional natural gas have a larger greenhouse gas footprint than do coal or oil, especially for the primary uses of residential and commercial heating.

Examining the causes of a devastating debris flow

Storm-triggered landslides cause loss of life, property damage, and landscape alterations. For instance, the remnants of Hurricane Camille in 1969 caused 109 deaths in central Virginia, after 600 mm of...

Mysterious dance of dwarfs may force a cosmic rethink

This is an artist's impression of the coherent orbit of dwarf galaxies about a large galaxy.The discovery that many small galaxies throughout the universe do not 'swarm' around larger ones like bees do but 'dance' in orderly disc-shaped orbits is a challenge to our understanding...