Mobile stroke treatment units may greatly improve survival rates, chance of recovery for ischemic stroke patients

Two new studies presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery 12th Annual Meeting in San Francisco, report that Mobile Stroke Treatment Units (MSTUs) can significantly reduce the time it takes to diagnose and treat patients for stroke, greatly improving...

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Device innovation is driving improvement in stroke treatment outcomes

In the last decade, Intra-Arterial (IA) stroke therapy (a technique in which thrombolytic agents and devices are passed through the arteries directly to the clot site) has gained notable momentum...

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New study: Consumers don't view GMO labels as negative 'warnings'

Jane Kolodinsky, professor and chair of the Department of Community Development and Applied Economics at the University of Vermont, presented results from a study at annual conference of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association on July 27 in San Francisco showing that GMO labeling would not act as 'warning labels' and scare consumers away from buying products with GMO ingredients.A new study released just days after the U.S. House passed a bill that would prevent states from requiring labels on genetically modified foods reveals that GMO labeling would not...

Sochi Winter Olympics 'cost billions more than estimated'

As the International Olympic Committee prepares to choose between Beijing (China) and Almaty (Kazakhstan) as the host of the 2022 Winter Olympics, a new report shows that the cost of...

Scripps researchers map out trajectory of April 2015 earthquake in Nepal

Researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have accurately mapped out the movement of the devastating 7.8-magnitude Nepal earthquake that killed over 9,000 and injured over 23,000...

Inbreeding not to blame for Colorado's bighorn sheep population decline

A bighorn sheep in Colorado is pictured.The health of Colorado's bighorn sheep population remains as precarious as the steep alpine terrain the animals inhabit, but a new study led by researchers at the University of Colorado...

Unlocking the rice immune system

Rice is a staple for half the world's population and the model plant for grass-type biofuel feedstocks.A bacterial signal that when recognized by rice plants enables the plants to resist a devastating blight disease has been identified by a multi-national team of researchers led by scientists...

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Young scientist discovers magnetic material unnecessary to create spin current

<p>Research at Argonne indicates you don't need a magnetic material to create spin current from insulators -- has important implications for the field of spintronics and the development of high-speed, low-power electronics that use electron spin rather than charge to carry information. 

<p>ABOVE: Typically when referring to electrical current, an image of electrons moving through a metallic wire is conjured. Using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), it is possible to create a current of pure spin (a quantum property of electrons related to its magnetic moment) in magnetic insulators. However, this work demonstrates that the SSE is not limited to magnetic insulators but also occurs in a class of materials known as paramagnets. Since magnetic moments within paramagnets do not interact with each other like in conventional ferromagnets, and thus do not hold their magnetization when an external magnetic field is removed, this discovery is unexpected and challenges current theories for the SSE. New ways of generating spin currents may be important for low-power high-speed spin based computing (spintronics), and is also an area of great fundamental interest. The paramagnetic SSE changes the way we think about thermally driven spintronics, allowing for the creation of new devices and architectures where spin currents are generated without ferromagnetic materials, which have been the centerpiece of all spin-based electronic devices up until this point.It doesn't happen often that a young scientist makes a significant and unexpected discovery, but postdoctoral researcher Stephen Wu of the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory just did...

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Study finds abrupt climate change may have rocked the cradle of civilization

Ali Pourmand (left) and Ph.D. candidate Arash Sharifi visually inspect the physical properties of a sediment core collected from NW Iran. This meter-long core recorded the environmental condition of the region for the past 2000 years.New research reveals that some of the earliest civilizations in the Middle East and the Fertile Crescent may have been affected by abrupt climate change. These findings show that while...

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What killed off the megafauna?

Abseiling into Natural Trap Cave, Wyoming, is shown. Alan Cooper descending the 100ft pitch into NTC to excavate Ice Age megafaunal bones.Rapid phases of warming climate played a greater role in the extinction of megafauna in the Late Pleistocene than did human activity, a new study shows. The study helps to...

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Female stink bugs 'select' the color of their eggs

This image shows a female spined soldier bug (<i>Podisus maculiventris</i>) (top) and the range of egg colors she is capable of laying (bottom).Stink bug mothers will lay darker or lighter eggs depending on how much light is reflecting off of a surface. The newly discovered adaptation is likely related to how some...

Some stroke treatments proven to reduce health care costs

Use of mechanical thrombectomy on qualifying stroke patients could result in major savings to the healthcare economy in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and other western countries with a similar healthcare structure, according to a new study presented at the Society...

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Emergency transport times for stroke patients still in need of improvement

Despite efforts to close the time gap between symptom onset and stroke treatment - including improvements in public education, 911 dispatch operations, pre-hospital detection and triage, hospital stroke system development,...

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Study finds non-genetic cancer mechanism

Cancer can be caused solely by protein imbalances within cells, a study of ovarian cancer has found.

Trigger found for defense to rice disease

This is Dr Benjamin Schwessinger.Biologists have discovered how the rice plant's immune system is triggered by disease, in a discovery that could boost crop yields and lead to more disease-resistant types of rice.

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Bossy cock takes the lead vocal of cock-a-doodle-do

Roosters crow in order of precedence of social ranking.From ancient times, people have been aware of the rooster's "cock-a-doodle-do" that marks the break of dawn, but has anyone wondered who crows first? In a new study published in...

Rice disease-resistance discovery closes the loop for scientific integrity

When disease-resistant rice is invaded by disease-causing bacteria, a small protein produced by the bacteria betrays the invader. Upon recognizing that protein, the rice plants sense that a microbial attack...

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Astronomers discover Earth's bigger cousin

Today an international team of astronomers from NASA's Kepler mission have announced the discovery of a near-Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star.

UT Dallas nanotechnology research leads to super-elastic conducting fibers

University of Texas at Dallas scientists have constructed novel fibers by wrapping sheets of tiny carbon nanotubes to form a sheath around a long rubber core. This illustration shows complex two-dimensional buckling, shown in yellow, of the carbon nanotube sheath/rubber-core fiber. The buckling results in a conductive fiber with super elasticity and novel electronic properties.An international research team based at The University of Texas at Dallas has made electrically conducting fibers that can be reversibly stretched to over 14 times their initial length and...

Mammoths killed by abrupt climate change

This image shows mammoth vertebrae in ice, Yukon Territory, Canada.New research has revealed abrupt warming, that closely resembles the rapid man-made warming occurring today, has repeatedly played a key role in mass extinction events of large animals, the megafauna,...

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Teens with medical marijuana cards much likelier to say they're addicted

A new University of Michigan study finds that teens using marijuana for medical reasons are 10 times more likely to say they are hooked on marijuana than youth who get...

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Simple technology makes CRISPR gene editing cheaper

Some DNA sequences appear multiple times in the genome. Here, an RNA guide probe labels repetitive regions in the nucleus of a <i>Xenopus laevis</i> sperm.University of California, Berkeley, researchers have discovered a much cheaper and easier way to target a hot new gene editing tool, CRISPR-Cas9, to cut or label DNA.

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