Two killer whales are spyhopping.

People use handshakes to sniff each other out

Scientists find that people use the touch of a handshake to sample and sniff signaling molecules. A sterile glove was used to identify signaling molecules transmitted via a handshake.Limp or firm, your handshake conveys subliminal social cues. Now, research reveals it also transmits chemical signals that could explain why the greeting evolved in the first place.

Gorilla origins of the last two AIDS virus lineages confirmed

Two of the four known groups of human AIDS viruses (HIV-1 groups O and P) have originated in western lowland gorillas, according to an international team of scientists from the...

Characterizing permafrost microbes in a changing climate

In the effort to curb climate change by reducing global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, thawing permafrost poses a critical challenge. These reservoirs of frozen organic matter embedded in Arctic soils...

Study: Men tend to be more narcissistic than women

A study by Emily Grijalva, Ph.D., assistant professor of organization and human resources in the UB School of Management, has shown that men, on average, are more narcissistic than women.With three decades of data from more than 475,000 participants, a new study on narcissism from the University at Buffalo School of Management reveals that men, on average, are more...

Genetically speaking, mammals are more like their fathers

You might resemble or act more like your mother, but a novel research study from UNC School of Medicine researchers reveals that mammals are genetically more like their dads. Specifically,...

Pediatricians face increasing pressure to delay vaccinations

Pediatricians are facing increasing pressure from some parents who want to spread out the recommended vaccine schedule for their children by postponing vaccines, pointing to a need for improved programs...

Munching bugs thwart eager trees, reducing the carbon sink

A forest tent caterpillar rests on an aspen leaf. These caterpillars are found in hardwood forests throughout the United States, where they feed on the leaves of trees like aspen and birch.In a high carbon dioxide world, the trees would come out ahead. Except for the munching bugs.

Activating genes on demand

When it comes to gene expression -- the process by which our DNA provides the recipe used to direct the synthesis of proteins and other molecules that we need for...

Space technology investigates large-scale changes to Africa's climate

This figure (1) shows a trend in rainfall over 10 years. Blue = wetter conditions, red = drier conditions.An international research team led by the University of Leicester has mapped the entire African continent south of the Sahara for geographical changes -- and has discovered that many areas...

Strength in numbers

This is a photograph of the nine qubit device. The device conists of nine superconducting 'Xmon' transmon in a row. Qubits interact with their nearest neighbors to detect and correct errors.When scientists develop a full quantum computer, the world of computing will undergo a revolution of sophistication, speed and energy efficiency that will make even our beefiest conventional machines seem...

Phthalates potentially alter levels of a pregnancy hormone that influences sex development

<p>This is an image of a healthy baby. <p>Exposure to hormone-altering chemicals called phthalates -- which are found in many plastics, foods  and personal care products -- early in pregnancy is associated with a disruption in an essential pregnancy hormone and adversely affects the masculinization of male genitals in the baby, according to research led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.Exposure to hormone-altering chemicals called phthalates -- which are found in many plastics, foods and personal care products -- early in pregnancy is associated with a disruption in an essential...

A high-salt diet could protect against invading microbes

Most people consume more salt than they need and therefore have a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, which are the two leading causes of death worldwide. But a...

Core work: Iron vapor gives clues to formation of Earth and moon

The Z machine is in Albuquerque, N.M., and is part of the Pulsed Power Program, which started at Sandia National Laboratories in the 1960s. Pulsed power concentrates electrical energy and turns it into short pulses of enormous power, which are then used to generate X-rays and gamma rays.Recreating the violent conditions of Earth's formation, scientists are learning more about how iron vaporizes and how this iron rain affected the formation of Earth and Moon. The study is...

New detector sniffs out origins of methane

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, second only to carbon dioxide in its capacity to trap heat in Earth's atmosphere for a long time. The gas can originate from lakes...

Astronomers find dust in the early universe

This image, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, shows a part of the galaxy cluster, Abell 1689, whose gravitational field amplifies the distant galaxy behind it. The distant dust-filled galaxy in zoom in the box.Dust plays an extremely important role in the universe -- both in the formation of planets and new stars. But dust was not there from the beginning and the earliest...

First detailed microscopy evidence of bacteria at the lower size limit of life

This cryo-electron tomography image reveals the internal structure of an ultra-small bacteria cell like never before. The cell has a very dense interior compartment and a complex cell wall. The darker spots at each end of the cell are most likely ribosomes. The image was obtained from a 3-D reconstruction. The scale bar is 100 nanometers.Scientists have captured the first detailed microscopy images of ultra-small bacteria that are believed to be about as small as life can get. The research was led by scientists from...

Scientists question rush to build Nicaragua canal

This is the path of the Nicaragua Interoceanic Grand Canal.A consortium of environmental scientists has expressed strong concern about the impact of a controversial Central American canal across Nicaragua.

New filter could advance terahertz data transmission

University of Utah electrical and computer engineering professor Ajay Nahata, left, and U graduate student Andrew Paulsen hold up a terahertz frequency filter made through a process they developed with an inkjet printer. They have discovered a new approach for designing filters capable of separating different frequencies in the terahertz spectrum, the next generation of communications bandwidth that could allow cell-phone users and Internet surfers to download data a thousand times faster than today.University of Utah engineers have discovered a new approach for designing filters capable of separating different frequencies in the terahertz spectrum, the next generation of communications bandwidth that could allow...

Big box stores could ditch the grid, use natural gas fuel cells instead

Natural gas powered solid oxide fuel cells, located at the point of use to produce electricity for facilities the size of big box stores, could provide economic and environmental benefits, with additional research, according to new study.Large facilities like big box stores or hospitals could keep the lights on by using a fuel cell that runs off the natural gas that already flows in pipelines below...

VTT: New flavors for lager beer -- successful generation of hybrid yeasts

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd has been the first to publish a scientific study on the successful generation of hybrid lager yeasts. For centuries the same few yeast...

New study reveals widespread risk of infectious diseases to wild bees

Researchers have discovered a network of viruses, which were previously associated with managed honeybees, may now pose a widespread risk to bumblebees in the wild, according to a new study...