Yale physicists have given Schrödinger's cat a second box to play in.

NASA scientist suggests possible link between primordial black holes and dark matter

This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows an infrared view of a sky area in the constellation Ursa Major.Dark matter is a mysterious substance composing most of the material universe, now widely thought to be some form of massive exotic particle. An intriguing alternative view is that dark...

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Supermassive black hole wind can stop new stars from forming

This is an artist's rendition of the galaxies Akira (right) and Tetsuo (left) in action. Akira's gravity pulls Tetsuo's gas into its central supermassive black hole, fueling winds that have the power to heat Akira's gas. Because of the action of the black hole winds, Tetsuo's donated gas is rendered inert, preventing a new cycle of star formation in Akira.Scientists have uncovered a new class of galaxies with supermassive black hole winds that are energetic enough to suppress future star formation.

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Squids on the rise as oceans change

Giant Australian cuttlefish (<i>Sepia apama</i>), Spencer Gulf, South Australia. Numbers are bouncing back.Unlike the declining populations of many fish species, the number of cephalopods (octopus, cuttlefish and squid) has increased in the world's oceans over the past 60 years, a University of...

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The future of sonar in semiheated oceans

Scientists are studying how climate change will affect the speed of sound under water to help prepare the U.S. Navy for operating in progressively warmer oceans.

Scientists capture the elusive structure of essential digestive enzyme

Stylized graphic of SEC-SAXS data (with cyan cross-section showing the elution profile and magenta cross-section showing scattering profile) and the structure of the activated phenylalanine hydroxylaseUsing a powerful combination of techniques from biophysics to mathematics, researchers have revealed new insights into the mechanism of a liver enzyme that is critical for human health. The enzyme,...

Remains of bizarre group of extinct snail-eating Australian marsupials discovered

This is a reconstruction of the 15 million year old Malleodectes from Riversleigh chomping down on what appears to have been its favourite food -- snails. The massive, shell-cracking premolar tooth is clearly visible in the open mouth.Fossil remains of a previously unknown family of carnivorous Australian marsupials that lived 15 million years ago have been discovered at the Riversleigh World Heritage Fossil Site in north-western Queensland...

Deep, old water explains why Antarctic Ocean hasn't warmed

Observed warming over the past 50 years (in degrees Celsius per decade) shows rapid warming in the Arctic, while the Southern Ocean around Antarctica has warmed little, if at all.The waters surrounding Antarctica may be one of the last places to experience human-driven climate change. New research from the University of Washington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology finds...

Fast, stretchy circuits could yield new wave of wearable electronics

Fabricated in interlocking segments like a 3-D puzzle, the new integrated circuits could be used in wearable electronics that adhere to the skin like temporary tattoos. Because the circuits increase wireless speed, these systems could allow health care staff to monitor patients remotely, without the use of cables and cords.The consumer marketplace is flooded with a lively assortment of smart wearable electronics that do everything from monitor vital signs, fitness or sun exposure to play music, charge other electronics...

Engineers discover a new gatekeeper for light

A photograph (left) shows the experimental set-up used to confirm the existence of the Bloch wave resonance, which was first predicted theoretically. An illustration (right) shows the interior of the experimental device, called a hollow periodic waveguide, which consists of two corrugated metallic plates separated by a variable distance of about one inch, and the upper plate can slide with respect to the lower. When researchers shot microwaves between the plates through the air, they were able to control which wavelengths of microwaves were allowed through by varying the position of the upper plate.Imagine a device that is selectively transparent to various wavelengths of light at one moment, and opaque to them the next, following a minute adjustment.

Cuing environmental responses in fungi

Fungi can sense environmental signals and react accordingly, changing their development, direction of growth, and metabolism. Sensory perception lies at the heart of adaptation to changing conditions, and helps fungi...

SwRI scientists discover evidence of ice age at martian north pole

Using radar data collected by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, a Southwest Research Institute-led team found evidence of an ice age recorded in the polar deposits of Mars. Ice ages on Mars are driven by processes similar to those responsible for...

Study documents African monkeys eating bats

<i>Cercopithecus</i> monkeys opportunistically preyed on bats not only in Gombe, but also in the Kakamega Forest in Kenya.Although Cercopithecus monkeys, a widely distributed genus in Africa, usually have a discerning palate for fruits and leaves, they are opportunistic omnivores that sometimes consume lizards, snakes, birds and mice....

ESF lists top 10 new species for 2016

The new species was named in honor of a park ranger known as "Don Fausto," who worked 43 years to conserve the giant tortoises of Galapagos.A hominin in the same genus as humans and an ape nicknamed "Laia" that might provide clues to the origin of humans are among the discoveries identified by the SUNY...

Study: Social media use may help identify students at risk of alcohol problems

Research from North Carolina State University and Ohio University finds that having an "alcohol identity" puts college students at greater risk of having drinking problems - and that posting about...

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Tiny wasp sniffs out, picks up 'good vibrations' to battle ash borer

Spathius galinae has been approved for release to help control the emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle that has devastated ash tree populations across the US.With the emerald ash borer beetle devastating ash tree populations throughout the United States -- from locations as far north as Massachusetts and as far south as Louisiana -- solutions...

Great apes communicate cooperatively

Mother chimp with her infant. Chimpanzees engage in more time-consuming communicative negotiations.Human communication is one of the most sophisticated signalling systems, being highly cooperative and including fast interactions. The first step into this collective endeavour can already be observed in early...

Antarctic fossils reveal creatures weren't safer in the south during dinosaur extinction

A painted reconstruction of typical Cretaceous marine environment in Antarctica, including the paperclip-shaped 'heteromorph' <i>ammonite Diplomoceras</i>.A study of more than 6,000 marine fossils from the Antarctic shows that the mass extinction event that killed the dinosaurs was sudden and just as deadly to life in...

Organism responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning may affect fisheries

Copepod <i>Calanus finmarchicus</i>.The toxic dinoflagellate, Alexandrium fundyense, is a photosynthetic plankton--a microscopic organism floating in the ocean, unable to swim against a current. New research by scientists at the University of Hawai'i...

How a huge landslide shaped Zion National Park

This view of Zion Canyon in Utah's Zion National Park shows the flat valley floor created when part of the peak named the Sentinel collapsed in a gigantic landslide, creating a dam and forming a lake, which eventually filled in with sediment. A new University of Utah study provides the first direct date for the landslide, determining it happened 4,800 years ago and showing it was so large that it would have covered New York City's Central Park with 275 feet of debris. This photo is the cover image for the June issue of the Geological Society America's journal <i>GSA Today</i>, which is publishing the Utah study.A Utah mountainside collapsed 4,800 years ago in a gargantuan landslide known as a "rock avalanche," creating the flat floor of what is now Zion National Park by damming the...

Targeting metals to fight pathogenic bacteria

Felipe Cava, associate professor, at The Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS), Ume&aring; University in Sweden.Researchers at the Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS) at Umeå University in Sweden participated in the discovery of a unique system of acquisition of essential metals in the...

Researchers identify critical factors that determine drought vulnerability of wheat, maize

Researchers led by Lixin Wang, assistant professor of earth sciences in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, have identified critical information about the environmental variables and agronomic...

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