Astronomers discover Earth's bigger cousin

Today an international team of astronomers from NASA's Kepler mission have announced the discovery of a near-Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star.

Mobile stroke treatment units may greatly improve survival rates, chance of recovery for ischemic stroke patients

Two new studies presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery 12th Annual Meeting in San Francisco, report that Mobile Stroke Treatment Units (MSTUs) can significantly reduce the time it...

Related science articles

Research with bite

<em>Gorgosaurus</em> is shown using its specialized teeth for feeding on a young <em>Corythosaurus</em> in Alberta, 75 million years ago.The Tyrannosaurus rex and its fellow theropod dinosaurs that rampage across the screen in movies like Jurassic World were successful predators partly due to a unique, deeply serrated tooth structure...

Economic slump, not natural gas boom, responsible for drop in CO2 emissions

The 11 percent decrease in climate change-causing carbon dioxide emissions in the U.S. between 2007 and 2013 was caused by the global financial recession - not the reduced use of...

Related science article

First measurements taken of South Africa's Iron Age magnetic field history

Magnetic field strength in the South Atlantic Anomaly is shown.A team of researchers has for the first time recovered a magnetic field record from ancient minerals for Iron Age southern Africa (between 1000 and 1500 AD). The data,...

Trigger found for defense to rice disease

This is Dr Benjamin Schwessinger.Biologists have discovered how the rice plant's immune system is triggered by disease, in a discovery that could boost crop yields and lead to more disease-resistant types of rice.

Related science articles

Small oxygen jump helped enable early animals take first breaths

If oxygen was a driver of the early evolution of animals, only a slight bump in oxygen levels facilitated it, according to a multi-institutional research team that includes a

Atomic view of cellular pump reveals how bacteria send out proteins

The pump, a single-molecule machine, (yellow coils) carries proteins through the cell membrane (pink and dark blue). Within the pump, the researchers found a strikingly large water-filled channel (light blue), a natural environment for hydrophilic proteins.Bacteria have plenty of things to send out into world beyond their own boundaries: coordinating signals to other members of their species, poisons for their enemies, and devious instructions to...

'Carbon sink' detected underneath world's deserts

The world's deserts may be storing some of the climate-changing carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, a new study suggests. Massive aquifers underneath deserts could hold more carbon than all...

Researchers predict material with record-setting melting point

Compounds made from hafnium and carbon have some of the highest known melting points. Using computer simulations, Brown University engineers predict that a material made with hafnium, nitrogen, and carbon will have a higher melting point than any known material.Using powerful computer simulations, researchers from Brown University have identified a material with a higher melting point than any known substance.

Scripps researchers map out trajectory of April 2015 earthquake in Nepal

Researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have accurately mapped out the movement of the devastating 7.8-magnitude Nepal earthquake that killed over 9,000 and injured over 23,000...

Ali Pourmand (left) and Ph.D. candidate Arash Sharifi visually inspect the physical properties of a sediment core collected from NW Iran. This meter-long core recorded the environmental condition of the region for the past 2000 years.
Related science articles

UT Dallas nanotechnology research leads to super-elastic conducting fibers

University of Texas at Dallas scientists have constructed novel fibers by wrapping sheets of tiny carbon nanotubes to form a sheath around a long rubber core. This illustration shows complex two-dimensional buckling, shown in yellow, of the carbon nanotube sheath/rubber-core fiber. The buckling results in a conductive fiber with super elasticity and novel electronic properties.An international research team based at The University of Texas at Dallas has made electrically conducting fibers that can be reversibly stretched to over 14 times their initial length and...

E-cigarettes may be as addictive as traditional ones

Electronic cigarettes or "e-cigs" have been touted as a tool smokers can use to wean themselves off of traditional cigarettes, which many believe are more harmful than their "e" counterparts....

Related science articles

First detection of lithium from an exploding star

This image from the New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory shows Nova Centauri 2013 in July 2015 as the brightest star in the centre of the picture. This was more than eighteen months after the initial explosive outburst. This nova was the first in which evidence of lithium has been found.The chemical element lithium has been found for the first time in material ejected by a nova. Observations of Nova Centauri 2013 made using telescopes at ESO's La Silla Observatory,...

New computer model could explain how simple molecules took first step toward life

Brookhaven researchers Sergei Maslov (left) and Alexi Tkachenko developed a theoretical model to explain molecular self-replication.Nearly four billion years ago, the earliest precursors of life on Earth emerged. First small, simple molecules, or monomers, banded together to form larger, more complex molecules, or polymers. Then...

Related science article

Female stink bugs 'select' the color of their eggs

This image shows a female spined soldier bug (<i>Podisus maculiventris</i>) (top) and the range of egg colors she is capable of laying (bottom).Stink bug mothers will lay darker or lighter eggs depending on how much light is reflecting off of a surface. The newly discovered adaptation is likely related to how some...

Computer security tools for journalists lacking in a post-Snowden world

Edward Snowden's leak of classified documents to journalists around the world about massive government surveillance programs and threats to personal privacy ultimately resulted in a Pulitzer Prize for public service.

Washington, DC sinking fast, adding to threat of sea-level rise

New research led by University of Vermont scientists Paul Bierman (left), and by his former graduate student, Ben DeJong (right), confirms that the land under the Chesapeake Bay is sinking rapidly and projects that Washington, DC, could drop by six or more inches in the next century -- adding to the problems of sea-level rise. The study also shows that this sinking land will continue, unabated, for tens of thousands of years.New research confirms that the land under the Chesapeake Bay is sinking rapidly and projects that Washington, D.C., could drop by six or more inches in the next century--adding to...

A single hair shows researchers what a bear has been eating

Researchers used single hairs from grizzly bears at the Washington State University Bear Research, Education and Conservation Center to develop a new, more precise way to look at a what wild bear eat.U.S. and Canadian researchers have found they can get a good idea of a grizzly bear's diet over several months by looking at a single hair. The technique, which measures...

Sochi Winter Olympics 'cost billions more than estimated'

As the International Olympic Committee prepares to choose between Beijing (China) and Almaty (Kazakhstan) as the host of the 2022 Winter Olympics, a new report shows that the cost of...

Keep Tahoe blue? Less algae, not clarity, key for lake's blueness

UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center postdoctoral scholar Shohei Watanabe collects data from a UC Davis-NASA research buoy to measure Lake Tahoe's blueness.Lake Tahoe's iconic blueness is most strongly related to algae, not clarity, according to research released today from the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center, or TERC. In the "Tahoe:...