A red-belted bumblebee visiting a lupine. This bee is covered in pollen, demonstrating the incredibly effective pollination service that such species perform. Yet, bumblebee species are responding very badly to climate changes across continents, and many species have simply retreated from hot areas entirely.
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Special issue: Philae results shed light on the nature of comets

Landing points (SONC) on a NAVCAM image are shown. Note that a second TD2, here taken at 17:24
(observed time: 17:25:26) is not modeled by RMOC and here only an example is given, since it
is not well constrained. We expect that the last hop was only a few meters.During the first ever landing of a probe on a comet, the world held its breath as Philae survived a bouncy landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on November 12, 2014. This...

Kennewick Man closely related to Native Americans, geneticists say

DNA from the 8,500-year-old skeleton of an adult man found in 1996, in Washington, is more closely related to Native American populations than to any other population in the world,...

Monster black hole discovered at cosmic dawn

This is an artist's impression of a quasar with a supermassive black hole in the distant universe.Scientists have discovered the brightest quasar in the early universe, powered by the most massive black hole yet known at that time. The international team led by astronomers from Peking...

Young, Jupiter-like planet discovered

This is an image of the Jupiter-like planet discovered by the Gemini Planet Imager.A team of researchers has discovered a Jupiter-like planet within a young system that could provide a new understanding of how planets formed around our sun.

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Epigenomics of Alzheimer's disease progression

Our susceptibility to disease depends both on the genes that we inherit from our parents and on our lifetime experiences. These two components -- nature and nurture -- seem to...

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Mystery of polar bear Knut's disease finally solved

Knut, the famous polar bear of the Berlin Zoological Garden (Germany) died of encephalitis, as diagnosed soon after his death. However, the cause of his disease has remained elusive until...

UTSA-led team finds black hole affecting galactic climate

Spiral galaxy NGC 5195 and the X-ray arcs Schlegel's team identified.A team of researchers led by Eric Schlegel, Vaughn Family Endowed Professor in Physics at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has discovered a powerful galactic blast produced...

Study finds peanut consumption in infancy prevents peanut allergy

Introduction of peanut products into the diets of infants at high risk of developing peanut allergy was safe and led to an 81 percent reduction in the subsequent development of...

Polar bears experience limited energy savings in summer, new study finds

A young polar bear on pack ice over deep waters in the Arctic Ocean, October 2009.Polar bears are unlikely to physiologically compensate for extended food deprivation associated with the ongoing loss of sea ice, according to one-of-its-kind research conducted by University of Wyoming scientists and...

New human ancestor species from Ethiopia lived alongside Lucy's species

Cleveland . . . A new relative joins "Lucy" on the human family tree. An international team of scientists, led by Dr. Yohannes Haile-Selassie of The Cleveland Museum of Natural...

Astronomers discover Earth's bigger cousin

Today an international team of astronomers from NASA's Kepler mission have announced the discovery of a near-Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star.

New Science paper calculates magnitude of plastic waste going into the ocean

The 192 countries with a coast bordering the Atlanta, Pacific and Indian oceans, Mediterranean and Black seas produced a total of 2.5 billion metric tons of solid waste. Of that, 275 million metric tons was plastic, and an estimated 8 million metric tons of mismanaged plastic waste entered the ocean in 2010.A plastic grocery bag cartwheels down the beach until a gust of wind spins it into the ocean. In 192 coastal countries, this scenario plays out over and over again...

Scientists discover world's oldest stone tools

Sammy Lokorodi, a resident of Kenya's northwestern desert who works as a fossil and artifact hunter, led the way to a trove of 3.3 million-year-old tools.Scientists working in the desert badlands of northwestern Kenya have found stone tools dating back 3.3 million years, long before the advent of modern humans, and by far the oldest...

Warming pushes Western US toward driest period in 1,000 years

A representation of the summer moisture in the US Central Plains and Southwest is shown. The brown line represents the variation in dryness since the year 1000; the lower the line on the graph, the drier the conditions. Colored lines to the right side of the graph represent what climate models see ahead: a trend toward dryness not seen in the previous millennium. As the authors describe it: Regional average time series of the summer season moisture balance metrics from the NADA and CMIP5models.The observational NADA PDSI series (brown) is smoothed using a 50-year loess spline to emphasize the low-frequency variability in the paleo-record. Model time series (PDSI, SM-30cm, and SM-2m) are the multimodel means averaged across the 17 CMIP5models, and the gray shaded area is the multimodel interquartile range for model PDSI.During the second half of the 21st century, the U.S. Southwest and Great Plains will face persistent drought worse than anything seen in times ancient or modern, with the drying...

NASA's Hubble observations suggest underground ocean on Jupiter's largest moon

In this artist's concept, the moon Ganymede orbits the giant planet Jupiter. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope observed aurorae on the moon generated by Ganymede's magnetic fields. A saline ocean under the moon's icy crust best explains shifting in the auroral belts measured by Hubble.NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has the best evidence yet for an underground saltwater ocean on Ganymede, Jupiter's largest moon. The subterranean ocean is thought to have more water than all...

Evolution of the Darwin's finches and their beaks

This is the large ground finch (<i>Geospiza magnirostris</i>) on Daphne Major Island. Reproduced with the permission of Princeton University Press.Darwin's finches, inhabiting the Galápagos archipelago and Cocos island, constitute an iconic model for studies of speciation and adaptive evolution. A team of scientists from Uppsala University and Princeton University...

Some endangered sawfishes are having babies, no sex required

These are juvenile smalltooth sawfish in the Charlotte Harbor estuarine system, Florida.Some female members of a critically endangered species of sawfish are reproducing in the wild without sex. The discovery, reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on June 1,...

Wandering Jupiter accounts for our unusual solar system

Jupiter may have swept through the early solar system like a wrecking ball, destroying a first generation of inner planets before retreating into its current orbit, according to a new...

Brontosaurus is back!

This is <I>Brontosaurus</I> as researchers see it today -- with a <I>Diplodocus</I>-like head.Although well known as one of the most iconic dinosaurs, Brontosaurus (the 'thunder lizard') has long been considered misclassified. Since 1903, the scientific community has believed that the genus Brontosaurus...

Menopausal whales are influential and informative leaders

Two killer whales are spyhopping.Menopause is a downright bizarre trait among animals. It's also rare. Outside of the human species, only the female members of two whale species outlive their reproductive lives in such...

Big dinosaurs steered clear of the tropics

Some 212 million years ago, landscapes weren't all dinosaur-friendly: dry, hot, with wildfires.For more than 30 million years after dinosaurs first appeared, they remained inexplicably rare near the equator, where only a few small-bodied meat-eating dinosaurs made a living.

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