Latest science news in Paleontology & Archaeology

Mars: The box seeking to answer the biggest question

27 weeks ago from

Europe prepares to send technology to Mars to look for evidence that there is life on the planet.

'Unique' Iron Age shield discovered in Leicestershire

27 weeks ago from

The British Museum, which will store the shield, described it as a "absolutely phenomenal object".

Climate change: Answers to your most asked questions

27 weeks ago from

You sent us thousands of questions about climate change. Here are some answers to the most common.

Everest: Three more die amid overcrowding near summit

27 weeks ago from

Seven have died climbing the world's highest peak in a week - more than for the whole of last year.

Millions 'lack access' to parks and green spaces

27 weeks ago from

Millions of people in Great Britain live more than a 10-minute walk away from their nearest park or green space, a study calculates.

Researchers wonder if ancient supernovae prompted human ancestors to walk upright

27 weeks ago from

Did ancient supernovae induce proto-humans to walk on two legs, eventually resulting in homo sapiens with hands free to build cathedrals, design rockets and snap iPhone selfies?

Research Proves Midwestern Fish Species Lives Beyond 100 Years

27 weeks ago from

Recent research from NDSU shows that the Bigmouth Buffalo (Ictiobus cyprinellus), a fish native to North America, lives more than eight decades longer than previously thought. The study documents several...

New species of pterosaur discovered in Patagonia

27 weeks ago from

This is a paleoartist's reconstruction of a ptesosaur. Scientists today announced the discovery of a new species of pterosaur from the Patagonia region of South America. The cranial remains...

Ancient fungi may have laid the groundwork for complex life

27 weeks ago from

Science Enjoy being alive? Thank these fossilized shrooms. The newly discovered billion-year-old fossilized fungal spores and hyphae suggest that fungi may have occupied land...

Bat-winged dinosaur was intriguing detour in evolution of flight

27 weeks ago from

A fossil unearthed in northeastern China of a feathered dinosaur a bit bigger than a blue jay that possessed bat-like wings represents a remarkable but short-lived detour in the evolution...

Old mold: Fossil of world's earliest fungus unearthed in Canada

27 weeks ago from

Microfossils of a globular spore connected to a T-shaped filament excavated in an Arctic region of northwestern Canada represent the oldest-known fungus, a discovery that sheds light on the origins...

Jawbone found in a Tibetan cave expands the known territory of ancient Denisovans

27 weeks ago from

Nearly 40 years after it was found by a monk in a Chinese cave, a fossilized chunk of jawbone has been revealed as coming from a mysterious relative of the...

Nature is in the worst shape in human history, U.N. report says

27 weeks ago from

Nature is in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday. It's all...

Meet the T. rex cousin that you could look down on

27 weeks ago from

History's most frightening dinosaur, the Tyrannosaurus rex, came from a long line of pipsqueaks. Scientists have identified a new cousin of the T. rex that reached only the 3-foot height...

Harvard’s Digital Giza Project allows scholars to explore Egypt — without leaving the country

27 weeks ago from

Four thousand years ago, a member of Egypt’s elite was buried on the Giza Plateau in an elaborate stone tomb, complete with several rooms and underground chambers. Then, in 1912, a team...

Harvard grad hopes to build bridges between museums and communities

27 weeks ago from

This is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.  Brittany N. Ellis ’19 can remember the moment she began loving museums. “I was in ninth grade, and...

Jane Pickering named director of Harvard’s Peabody Museum

27 weeks ago from

Jane Pickering has been named the William and Muriel Seabury Howells Director of Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) Claudine Gay...

Harvard researcher connects the dots in fin-to-limb evolution

27 weeks ago from

About 400 million years ago, vertebrates first began to crawl from the primordial seas onto land. Last week, thanks to a cutting-edge mathematical-analysis technique, a global research team uncovered how a crucial stage...

Talking to the new director of Harvard’s Peabody Museum

27 weeks ago from

When Jane Pickering assumes her new role as William and Muriel Seabury Howells Director of Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology July 1, she will have an eye on both the...

Egyptian village revives Papyrus as tourism returns

27 weeks ago from

Residents of El-Karamous in the Nile Delta have revived the ancient art of papermaking.

Analysis reveals why some yellow paint in Picasso's Femme has faded to brown

27 weeks ago from

Differences in the paints' cadmium sulfide particles affect the rate of degradation

A química brasileira Joana D'Arc Félix de Sousa em sua trajetória da pobreza até inventora e professora

27 weeks ago from

Filha de um profissional de curtume e de uma empregada doméstica, ela agora defende a juventude desprivilegiada

Drones edge toward the research lab

27 weeks ago from

An NIH-backed partnership looks to use drones to replace robotic arms in sample delivery

La espectroscopía Raman, ahora con resolución de Angstroms

27 weeks ago from

Un estudio logra imágenes de vibraciones moleculares con resolución atómica

Solving the chrome-plating mystery of the terra-cotta army

27 weeks ago from

Coating on 2,200-year-old bronze weapons comes from lacquer

Corante alimentício amarelo ajuda os pesquisadores a imprimir estruturas semelhantes a órgãos

27 weeks ago from

A visão química permite que pesquisadores imitem estruturas complexas de órgãos e redes de vasos sanguíneos

Ancient proteins tell tales of our ancestors

27 weeks ago from

With the help of mass spec, archaeologists are turning to proteins, which degrade less quickly than DNA, to learn about the past