Latest science news in Health & Medicine

Researchers pursue single-dose gene therapy to treat cocaine addiction

1 week ago from Science Blog

In a radical new approach to treat cocaine addition, researchers at the Mayo Clinic are seeking approval for first-in-human studies of a single-dose gene therapy. To support the safety and...

Human body temperature has decreased in the United States, Stanford study finds

1 week ago from Science Blog

Since the early 19th century, the average human body temperature in the United States has dropped, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. “Our...

Big 12 fines West Virginia basketball coach Bob Huggins for 'blind mice' ref jab

1 week ago from UPI

The Big 12 has fined Bob Huggins $10,000 after the West Virginia men's basketball coach called referees "blind mice," following a win against Oklahoma State.

Record drop in U.S. cancer deaths helped by progress against lung cancer

1 week ago from UPI

A 29 percent drop in U.S. cancer deaths between 1991 and 2017 was driven by declines in deaths from four major cancers -- lung, colon, breast and prostate, according to...

Gut Microbes May Improve Stroke Recovery

1 week ago from Science Blog

New research shows that the microorganisms in our gut could help protect brain cells from damage caused by inflammation after a stroke. The study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience by researchers...

Discoveries detail role of stem cell in deadly gastric cancer

1 week ago from Science Blog

A Cornell study provides important new insights into a common and deadly type of gastric cancer. Incidence of this cancer, called gastric squamous-columnar junction (SCJ) cancer, also known as gastroesophageal...

Nanoparticles Deliver 'Suicide Gene' Therapy to Pediatric Brain Tumors Growing in Mice

1 week ago from Newswise - Scinews

Johns Hopkins researchers report that a type of biodegradable, lab-engineered nanoparticle they fashioned can successfully deliver a "suicide gene" to pediatric brain tumor cells implanted in the brains of mice....

WHO: 'World's worst measles epidemic' in Congo has killed 6,000

1 week ago from UPI

The death toll from a measles outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has topped 6,000, the United Nations' primary health agency said.

Treatments for touch hypersensitivity explored in new research

1 week ago from Harvard Science

Harvard University and Deerfield Management announced today the selection of a first project for funding under the Lab1636 R&D alliance that aims to advance promising innovations from labs across the University toward the...

Bacterial link in celiac disease

1 week ago from Science Daily

Researchers have discovered bacterial exposure is a potential environmental risk factor in developing celiac disease, a hereditary autoimmune-like condition that affects about one in 70 Australians.

Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer

1 week ago from Science Daily

The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported.

Scientists develop way to track salmonella infection in real time

1 week ago from Physorg

When bacteria like salmonella infect and sicken people, they hijack a person's cell proteins to develop a defense against an immune response. Understanding how that works and developing methods for...

Study finds salt nanoparticles are toxic to cancer cells

1 week ago from Physorg

A new study at the University of Georgia has found a way to attack cancer cells that is potentially less harmful to the patient. Sodium chloride nanoparticles—more commonly known as...

Chlorine could increase antimicrobial resistance

1 week ago from Physorg

Conventional wastewater disinfection using chlorine could facilitate the spread of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria. Treating some types of wastewater with ultraviolet (UV) light instead could be part of the solution,...

Human immune cells produced in a dish in world first

1 week ago from Physorg

One day the advance could lead to a patient's own skin cells being used to produce new cells for cancer immunotherapy or to test autoimmune disease interventions.

New discovery will help fight lethal oilseed rape disease

1 week ago from Physorg

Researchers at the University of Hertfordshire have found a way to improve the resilience of oilseed rape and reduce the estimated £100m annual loss to phoma stem canker, one of...

Consequences of Iranian commander's killing may be disastrous

1 week ago from UPI

No one in the United States will mourn the death of Qassem Soleimani, the late commander of Iran's Quds force, eviscerated by Hellfire missiles last week at Baghdad airport. But...

Male fertility supplements don't boost fertility, study says

1 week ago from UPI

Supplements containing zinc and folic acid don't appear to boost male fertility, a new study finds. Despite marketing claims, they don't improve pregnancy rates, sperm counts or sperm function, researchers...

New Jersey police sergeant arrested in FBI corruption probe

1 week ago from UPI

Agents with the Federal Bureau of Investigation arrested a New Jersey police sergeant accused of participating in a conspiracy to steal thousands of dollars from suspects of drug cases, authorities...

Impeachment: Pelosi says impeachment articles will stay put until McConnell unveils trial guidelines

1 week ago from UPI

House Speak Nancy Pelosi dug her heels into the sand late Tuesday saying she won't send articles of impeachment to the Senate until Democrats know what a trial in the...

Chicago White Sox signing veteran reliever Steve Cishek to one-year contract

1 week ago from UPI

The Chicago White Sox agreed to terms with veteran relief pitcher Steve Cishek on a one-year contract.

Naval Criminal Investigative Sservice takes over search for missing rifles at Camp Lejeune

1 week ago from UPI

The Naval Criminal Investigative Service has taken over a search for two rifles that went missing in December during a training exercise at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, N.C.

'Prozac Nation' author Elizabeth Wurtzel dies at 52

1 week ago from UPI

"Prozac Nation" author Elizabeth Wurtzel died at the age of 52 after being diagnosed with breast cancer which recently metastasized to her brain, her husband said.

Children frequently receive unnecessary medical care regardless of insurance type

1 week ago from Science Daily

Children with public insurance are slightly more likely to receive medical services that they don't need than those with private insurance, a new study finds.

Detroit Pistons' Blake Griffin out indefinitely following knee surgery

1 week ago from UPI

Detroit Pistons star forward Blake Griffin is out indefinitely after he underwent a successful arthroscopic procedure on his injured left knee.

New N.S. Health Authority head wants public's ideas on how to improve health-care system

1 week ago from CBC: Health

Just three weeks into the job as head of the Nova Scotia Health Authority, Dr. Brendan Carr knows he's leading an organization with an image problem, but he's determined to...

Combat birth tourism by changing immigration law, B.C. mayor says

1 week ago from CBC: Health

Babies born to non-residents make up almost a quarter of all births at the Richmond Hospital. The city's mayor says it is time for the federal government to change a...