New endoscope allows for easier use in diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic diseases

Published: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 10:53 in Health & Medicine

A research article to be published on March 21, 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology reports their experience of this new endoscope that can directly visualize the biliary and pancreatic ducts. The research team led by Dr. Raijman of Digestive Associates of Houston, used the Spyglass Spyscope® (Boston Scientific; Natick, MA). This multi-center study was performed at hospitals in Houston, Dallas and San Antonio, Texas. They evaluated the Spyglass Spyscope® to assess its performance, feasibility and safety. The new intraductal endoscope was used successfully in 128 patients with disorders of the bile duct, liver and pancreas. The primary therapeutic use was biliary and pancreatic stone therapy using electrohydraulic or holmium laser lithotripsy. Clearance of stones was achieved in 37 pts after one procedure and 4 pts after two procedures. The most important diagnostic use was that in patients with biliary strictures thought to be malignant, the diagnosis was modified in 20/29 and confirmed malignant in 10/23 using the Spyglass system. There was no morbidity associated with the use of the Spyglass.

"This new technology will likely revolutionize the way that we take care of patients with biliary and pancreatic diseases. In an era of minimally invasive surgery, Spyglass offers our physicians the ability to accurately directly assess and treat disease and our patients to receive high-level endoscopic care. " – Douglas S. Fishman, author

The Spyglass technology offers patients an improvement over standard therapies for disease in the liver and pancreas, as the newer system can directly visualize and sample the areas they are treating. With an easier way of approaching these organs, more accurate diagnoses are possible, as well as definitive treatment of certain conditions such as large obstructing bile duct stones.

Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology

Share

Latest Science Newsletter

Get the latest and most popular science news articles of the week in your Inbox! It's free!

Check out our next project, Biology.Net