Latest science news in Health & Medicine

Teens Think They Have Asthma Under Control, But Benefit From New Approach To Treatment

9 years ago from Science Daily

Two studies that offer new insights to help adolescents and younger children improve their asthma control were recently conducted. One study found that teens with asthma dramatically overestimate their ability...

Apples, Apple Juice Shown to Prevent Early Atherosclerosis

9 years ago from Newswise - Scinews

Long-term consumption of antioxidant-rich apples and apple juice may prevent atherosclerosis, according to researchers from France.

Treatment Advances For Fibroids, Menopause

9 years ago from Science Daily

Women with fibroids and endometriosis facing the possibility of hysterectomy may now choose less invasive treatment options to preserve fertility, according to a Yale professor presenting at the American College...

Part I: Hunting for a miracle, grasping at a chance

9 years ago from Physorg

(AP) -- It was only a chair, but it had become his purgatory. Each day that John Pou spent in the wheelchair, his spirit seemed to die a little more....

Study identifies rapid obesity increase in Jamaica

9 years ago from SciDev

A study has identified rapid increases in obesity in Jamaica, compared with Nigeria and the United States.

Fixing Up 'This Old House' May Increase Exposure To Lead In Young

9 years ago from Science Daily

Ripping out and tearing down to create a divinely designed home, a la HGTV, is all the rage today -- and the economic downturn may be leading more families to...

Free Radical Link Suggested Between Pollution And Asthma

9 years ago from Science Daily

Free radical pollution in the air could be a cause of asthma. Chemists have discovered that the atmospheric nitrate radical irreversibly damages amino acids, which are the building blocks for...

Uninsured Kids In Middle Class Have Same Unmet Needs As Poor

9 years ago from Science Daily

Nationwide, uninsured children in families earning between $38,000 and $77,000 annually are nearly as likely to forgo health care as uninsured children in poorer families. More than 40 percent of...

New 'OPAL Therapy' Presents Simple, Cost-effective Method Of Treating HIV Infection

9 years ago from Science Daily

Australian researchers have unveiled a new immunotherapy technique to help prevent the progression from HIV infection to AIDS. Th simple cost-effective technique has been effective in primates.

Arch supports may not always protect against knee problems

9 years ago from LA Times - Health

A study tracks runners and walkers and finds that over-the-counter orthotics can place more force on knee joints, contributing to osteoarthritis in that area. ...

No lack of physician treatment guidelines

9 years ago from LA Times - Health

Doctors looking for advice on treating patients can go to such sites as those offered by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Guideline Clearinghouse. ...

Diabetes' effects on pregnancy and babies

9 years ago from LA Times - Health

Women who have diabetes before pregnancy may have problems with their blood-sugar control throughout the pregnancy, says Jean Lawrence, the lead author of the recent study and a research scientist...

Costs of overtreating patients

9 years ago from LA Times - Health

Doctors aiming to be more 'safe than sorry' with unwarranted tests and treatments can increase costs and worry. ...

Evidence that stun guns may stimulate the heart

9 years ago from Biology News Net

On the eve of the British Columbia inquiry into the death of Robert Dziekanski, a review of scientific data in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) finds that in some cases,...

FDA approves HeartMate II mechanical heart pump for heart-failure patients

9 years ago from Biology News Net

Heart failure patients at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center were among the first to be implanted with the HeartMate® II LVAS (Left Ventricular Assist System) -- a miniature mechanical pump...

Competitive eating: Are winners born or made?

9 years ago from LA Times - Health

As the sport grows in popularity, researchers are studying the physiology. Doctors worry that extreme eaters may be endangering their health. ...

High-fat, low-carb diet shown to curb epileptic seizures

9 years ago from LA Times - Science

The diet mimics the effects of starvation and induces chemicals in the brain that appear to reduce seizures. In its first clinical trial, researchers find it helps children. ...

High Blood Pressure Still Sneaking Past Doctors, Stanford Study Shows

9 years ago from Science Daily

Despite the well-known dangers of high blood pressure, major shortfalls still exist in the screening, treatment and control of the disease even when patients are getting a doctor's care, according...

Doctors to reassess antibiotics for 'chronic Lyme' disease

9 years ago from Physorg

(AP) -- Patients who believe they suffer long-term problems from Lyme disease are claiming victory over a national doctors group. The Infectious Diseases Society of America has agreed to...

UPI NewsTrack Health and Science News

9 years ago from UPI

Temporary cooling trend may offset warming... EPA to cut lead emissions... Hand, foot, mouth disease kills 21 kids... EPA official allegedly fired over cleanup... Health/Science news from UPI.

Nortel loss widens

9 years ago from CBC: Technology & Science

Nortel Networks reported a wider first-quarter loss on Friday and reported revenue that was ahead of analysts' projections.

Medical marijuana user who was denied liver transplant dies

9 years ago from Physorg

(AP) -- A man who was denied a liver transplant largely because he used marijuana with medical approval to ease the symptoms of hepatitis C has died.

Scientists share $500,000 prize for biomedical research

9 years ago from Physorg

(AP) -- The nation's richest prize in medicine and biomedical research was awarded Friday to two researchers for work that has improved disease treatments and may lead to new...

The Drug Resurrector

9 years ago from PopSci

With Big Pharma spending upward of $1 billion to bring a single drug to pharmacy shelves, it’s little wonder that unprofitable afflictions like malaria and African sleeping sickness go largely...

Booster seats now mandatory in N.B.

9 years ago from CBC: Health

A new law that makes booster seats in vehicles mandatory for small children came into effect in New Brunswick on Thursday.

UBC medical staff wrote PM to support supervised injection site

9 years ago from CBC: Health

Doctors at the University of British Columbia's Department of Medicine last year unanimously urged Prime Minister Stephen Harper to keep Vancouver's supervised injection site open, a letter leaked to the...

FDA says wider use of Cephalon drug carries risks of misuse

9 years ago from AP Health

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Government regulators on Friday said encouraging wider use of a powerful painkiller made by Cephalon Inc. raises the risk of potentially fatal misuse of the drug....

Attitudes towards children with disabilities need improvement, parents say

9 years ago from CBC: Health

Our communities have come a spectacularly long way over the years when it comes to including kids with disabilities, but barriers persist, say people who deal with such issues daily.